Cognitive

Jr. VIP
Jr. VIP
Joined
Mar 11, 2015
Messages
407
Reaction score
224
We're experimenting with a new AI system (multiple AI models working together) that is able to not only paraphrase but also enhance the content. The goal here is to make the AI "understand" the main ideas of each paragraph in an article and write a new paragraph with a different structure and different words. Furthermore, it is also trained to add new and relevant content where it "feels" it's needed.
The end result is usually a 100% unique article when checked with any plagiarism tool, that looks different and is actually different mainly due to the new content the AI is adding.

Here it is an example of paraphrasing, rewriting & enhancing content:

Original Paragraph:
Create Complex Passwords
We know you’ve heard it before, but creating strong, unique passwords for all your critical accounts really is the best way to keep your personal and financial information safe. This is especially true in the era of widespread corporate hacks, where one data breach can reveal tens of thousands of user passwords. If you reuse your passwords, a hacker can take the leaked data from one attack and use it to log in to your other accounts. Our best advice: use a password manager to help you store and create strong passwords for all of your accounts.

The a/m paragraph, paraphrased and enhanced by our AI:
Use Strong Password Creation Techniques
You've probably heard it before, but using strong, unique passwords for all your important accounts really is the best way to safeguard your sensitive info. That goes double now that hackers are targeting major companies like Target, Home Depot, and Equifax. And if you're reusing those same weak passwords across multiple sites, a cyberthief could steal your login credentials and gain access to everything from banking records to credit card numbers. So instead of relying on memory alone, why don't you try something new? Password managers let you easily generate random, complex passwords that'll never repeat themselves -- no matter how many times you enter them into forms. They also allow you to save each site's username/password combo in just one place, so they won't ever accidentally leak again. Plus, they offer features like autofill functions that automatically fill in usernames and passwords for you -- saving time and effort. Best of all, these programs aren't limited to computers; they work on smartphones too. Now that's convenience at its finest.

And here it is an example of a full article paraphrasing & enhancing:

Original Source:
With hacks, scams, cybercriminals, malware and more, the internet can feel like a dangerous place these days. And, the recent proliferation of devices, from smartphones and tablets to internet-connected appliances, has opened us up to even greater risks.

But the good news is that by taking just a small handful of security measures we can greatly reduce our exposure to all these threats.

Here are 10 internet safety tips to help you get started:

Create Complex Passwords
We know you’ve heard it before, but creating strong, unique passwords for all your critical accounts really is the best way to keep your personal and financial information safe. This is especially true in the era of widespread corporate hacks, where one data breach can reveal tens of thousands of user passwords. If you reuse your passwords, a hacker can take the leaked data from one attack and use it to log in to your other accounts. Our best advice: use a password manager to help you store and create strong passwords for all of your accounts.

Then, check to see if your online accounts offer multi-factor authentication. This is when multiple pieces of information are required to verify your identity. So, to log into an account you may need to enter a code that is sent to your cell phone, as well as your password or passphrase.

Boost Your Network Security
Now that your logins are safer, make sure that your connections are secure. When at home or work, you probably use a password-protected router that encrypts your data. But, when you’re on the road, you might be tempted to use free, public Wi-Fi. The problem with public Wi-Fi is that it is often unsecured. This means it’s relatively easy for a hacker to access your device or information. That’s why you should consider investing in a virtual private network (VPN). A VPN is a piece of software that creates a secure connection over the internet, so you can safely connect from anywhere.

Use a Firewall
Even if your network is secure, you should still use a firewall. This an electronic barrier that blocks unauthorized access to your computers and devices and is often included with comprehensive security software. Using a firewall ensures that all of the devices connected to your network are secured, including Internet of Things (IoT) devices like smart thermostats and webcams. This is important since many IoT devices aren’t equipped with security measures, giving hackers a vulnerable point of entry to your entire network.

Click Smart
Now that you’ve put smart tech measures into place, make sure that you don’t invite danger with careless clicking. Many of today’s online threats are based on phishing or social engineering. This is when you are tricked into revealing personal or sensitive information for fraudulent purposes. Spam emails, phony “free” offers, click bait, online quizzes and more all use these tactics to entice you to click on dangerous links or give up your personal information. Always be wary of offers that sound too good to be true or ask for too much information. Never give away your Social Security number!

Be a Selective Sharer
These days, there are a lot of opportunities to share our personal information online and on social media. Just be cautious about what you share, particularly when it comes to your identity information. This can potentially be used to impersonate you or guess your passwords, security questions, and logins.

Protect Your Mobile Life
Our mobile devices can be just as vulnerable to online threats as our laptops. In fact, tablets and cell phones face new risks, such as dangerous apps and links sent by text message. Be careful where you click, don’t respond to messages from strangers, and only download apps from official app stores after reading other users’ reviews first. Make sure that your security software is enabled on your all your devices.

Practice Safe Surfing & Shopping
When shopping online, inputting your credit card or financial information, or visiting websites for online banking or other sensitive transactions, check the site’s address. The address should always start with “https,” instead of just “http,” and have a padlock icon in the URL field. This indicates that the website is secure and uses encryption to scramble your data so it can’t be intercepted by an identity thief. Also, be on the lookout for websites that have misspellings or bad grammar in their addresses. They could be copycats of legitimate websites. Use a safe search tool such as McAfee WebAdvisor to steer clear of risky sites.

Keep Up to Date
Keep all of your software updated so you have the latest security patches. Turn on automatic updates on your computer, tablet, and cell phone so you don’t have to think about it, and make sure that your security software is set to run regular scans.

Look Out for the Latest Scams
Online threats are evolving all the time, so make sure you know what to look out for. Currently, “ransomware” is on the rise. This is when a hacker threatens to lock you out of all of your files unless you agree to pay a ransom. Stay on top of this and other threats by staying informed.

Keep Your Guard Up
Always be cautious about your online activity, which sites you visit, and what you share on social networking websites. Use comprehensive security software, and make sure to back up your data on a regular basis in case something goes wrong. By taking preventive measures and following just a few basic internet safety rules, you can protect yourself from identity theft and malware and keep your personal and financial information secure.

Paraphrased and Enhanced article with our AI:
These days, many hackers target smart TVs, routers, and other Internet-enabled gadgets. They're looking for ways into your home networks, stealing personal info, and installing malicious software that could lead to identity theft or worse. Here's everything you should know before buying any new device.

Luckily, we can take steps to minimize risk and stay safer both at work and at home.

These ten Internet Safety Tips will help you stay safe online:

Use Strong Password Creation Techniques
You've probably heard it before, but using strong, unique passwords for all your important accounts really is the best way to safeguard your sensitive info. That goes double now that hackers are targeting major companies like Target, Home Depot, and Equifax. And if you're reusing those same weak passwords across multiple sites, a cyberthief could steal your login credentials and gain access to everything from banking records to credit card numbers. So instead of relying on memory alone, why don't you try something new? Password managers let you easily generate random, complex passwords that'll never repeat themselves -- no matter how many times you enter them into forms. They also allow you to save each site's username/password combo in just one place, so they won't ever accidentally leak again. Plus, they offer features like autofill functions that automatically fill in usernames and passwords for you -- saving time and effort. Best of all, these programs aren't limited to computers; they work on smartphones too. Now that's convenience at its finest.

If your bank offers 2FA, take advantage of it. Multi-Factor Authentication requires several steps before someone can access your account. For example, they would send you a text message containing a special code. Then, you'd input that code along with your username and password at login time.

Increase network security
When using a public hotspot, there are risks involved. Your personal information could potentially be accessed by hackers. To avoid these problems, you should invest in a Virtual Private Network (VPN), which allows you to securely connect from any location.

Consider using a firewall
Firewalls are essential tools to prevent intruders from accessing sensitive data stored on your device or system. They work by blocking incoming connections unless they match specific criteria. For example, a firewall could allow only authorized IP addresses to connect to your router. Firewall rules are set using a configuration file called iptables.

Select Smart
Make sure that you do not allow yourself to become vulnerable through careless clicks. Phishing scams and spam email campaigns often rely on tricking users into giving over private information. Stay vigilant at all times and never share any personal details like credit card numbers, bank account info, passwords, etc., no matter how tempting they seem. Be careful before clicking on anything that looks suspicious. Don't let your guard down just because something seems harmless enough.

Share selectively
Social networking sites like Facebook allow users to post pictures, videos, status updates, links, comments, text messages, notes, and private messages. While these services offer many benefits, they also pose risks, including exposing sensitive information, allowing hackers access into accounts, and giving malicious actors control over user content. Users should exercise caution before sharing any personally identifiable information via social networks.

Keep Your Cell Phone Safe
Be cautious whenever clicking on unknown URLs or downloading apps from untrusted sources. Don't open attachments unless they're really important; instead, save them to your device's cloud storage like Google Drive or Dropbox. Also, enable anti-malware protection on your laptop and tablet computers. And remember to turn off Wi-Fi access points at night before going to bed.

Be Aware Of The Following Safety Tips While Online Shopping Or Using Social Media Sites Like Facebook And Twitter
Checking the web address before entering personal information is important. Websites that don't begin with https:// indicate they aren't encrypted, which means someone else has access to view your transaction history. To avoid giving thieves free rein over your finances, only enter your account number into secured pages. Be wary of poorly spelled URLs; these often signify a scammer trying to look like another company. Look for spelling errors and poor grammar. These telltale signs mean scammers are copying legitimate companies' names and logos. Check your bank statements carefully after any suspicious activity occurs. Scam artists sometimes try to steal money from your accounts through fraudulent charges.

Stay Current
Make sure you update your operating system regularly. Keep your antivirus program up to date and running frequent virus checks. Make sure your firewall settings allow only approved connections through your router. And check any apps you download before installing them.

Be Aware Of The Latest Scams
Ransomware has become increasingly prevalent over recent years. Hackers now threaten to delete your personal files unless you agree to pay a ransom. Be aware of these types of attacks and stay vigilant. Learn more here.

Be Aware Of The Danger Zone
Be careful about what you do online. Always take precautions against viruses and spyware; don't click links in emails unless they're coming from someone you know well; and never open attachments sent by strangers. Also, remember to log off after using public computers, like at libraries. And finally, delete old cookies regularly. These simple tips will help ensure your privacy and prevent cybercrime.

Quetext plagiarism score: 97% unique and the 3% difference to a score of 100% are some common expressions that can be found in many online articles (eg.: "Your personal information could be"). So, in reality, this is a 100% unique article.


But we have some things we're worried about:

1. Is the creation of such a tool (that not only paraphrases content but also enhances it) a good idea?
2. After checking the a/m sample, do you feel that the content is too "enhanced" and it goes too far from the original source? Or should it be even more enhanced and go even further from the original source?

Thanks
 
1. Definitely yes.
2. If it keeps sense of original input and meets search intent + answers main topic it's fine.
 
Add this to sensit NOW!!! Btw, what about copyscape?
 
100% yes on this one buddy, have full faith in your ability to get her done too.

Folks just need to remember, even if paraphrased and enhanced, content should always be proof-read and worked on.
 
100% yes on this one buddy, have full faith in your ability to get her done too.

Folks just need to remember, even if paraphrased and enhanced, content should always be proof-read and worked on.
Thanks, mate!
Tool is a good idea and has decent output.
Thanks for your feedback
The tool is working good in my opinion. Please go ahead.
Thanks for your feedback
Give credit where it is due. You took this idea from @Sartre 's journey.
Didn't read the entire journey but afaik he uses Pegasus (or something similar) for paraphrasing the content. While Pegasus is an interesting solution, we use Transformers for this job. Furthermore, the models are trained by us for evaluating the content, paraphrasing & rewording it and adding new related content and improve its readability.
 
Didn't read the entire journey but afaik he uses Pegasus (or something similar) for paraphrasing the content. While Pegasus is an interesting solution, we use Transformers for this job. Furthermore, the models are trained by us for evaluating the content, paraphrasing & rewording it and adding new related content and improve its readability.
Pegasus is a transformer :p
 
Give credit where it is due. You took this idea from @Sartre 's journey.
So @Sartre took idea from Quillbot or what? This is nonsense. Sartre does tons of other things and paraphrasing is just one of X steps from his journey.
While I really appreciate him as a person as well as what he does (his journey), your comment makes no sense.
 
So @Sartre took idea from Quillbot or what? This is nonsense. Sartre does tons of other things and paraphrasing is just one of X steps from his journey.
While I really appreciate him as a person as well as what he does (his journey), your comment makes no sense.
He has copyright claims to this and should sue immediately. I will be his legal representative.
 

Quetext plagiarism score: 97% unique and the 3% difference to a score of 100% are some common expressions that can be found in many online articles (eg.: "Your personal information could be"). So, in reality, this is a 100% unique article.



But we have some things we're worried about:

1. Is the creation of such a tool (that not only paraphrases content but also enhances it) a good idea?
2. After checking the a/m sample, do you feel that the content is too "enhanced" and it goes too far from the original source? Or should it be even more enhanced and go even further from the original source?

Thanks

Fucking great to see someone who uses Quetext and understands it.


Paraphrased and Enhanced article with our AI: this article was pretty damn good and readable @Cognitive
 
Looks impressive, how can we get to test the tool?
 
He has copyright claims to this and should sue immediately. I will be his legal representative.
Sorry, I've already hired Johnny Depp's lawyer

Guys. Does anyone of you have experience with direct ad arbitrage, like Taboola, US traffic to a Mediavine site?
 
Sorry, I've already hired Johnny Depp's lawyer

Guys. Does anyone of you have experience with direct ad arbitrage, like Taboola, US traffic to a Mediavine site?
Isn't it better to just hire Johnny himself?
 
So @Sartre took idea from Quillbot or what? This is nonsense. Sartre does tons of other things and paraphrasing is just one of X steps from his journey.
While I really appreciate him as a person as well as what he does (his journey), your comment makes no sense.
Also I stand against copyright or intellectual rights in any shape and form so I don't give a damn. People should chill
 
We're experimenting with a new AI system (multiple AI models working together) that is able to not only paraphrase but also enhance the content. The goal here is to make the AI "understand" the main ideas of each paragraph in an article and write a new paragraph with a different structure and different words. Furthermore, it is also trained to add new and relevant content where it "feels" it's needed.
The end result is usually a 100% unique article when checked with any plagiarism tool, that looks different and is actually different mainly due to the new content the AI is adding.

Here it is an example of paraphrasing, rewriting & enhancing content:

Original Paragraph:


The a/m paragraph, paraphrased and enhanced by our AI:


And here it is an example of a full article paraphrasing & enhancing:

Original Source:


Paraphrased and Enhanced article with our AI:


Quetext plagiarism score: 97% unique and the 3% difference to a score of 100% are some common expressions that can be found in many online articles (eg.: "Your personal information could be"). So, in reality, this is a 100% unique article.


But we have some things we're worried about:

1. Is the creation of such a tool (that not only paraphrases content but also enhances it) a good idea?
2. After checking the a/m sample, do you feel that the content is too "enhanced" and it goes too far from the original source? Or should it be even more enhanced and go even further from the original source?

Thanks
Wait you mean sensi.ai? I tried it. GPT-3 is garbage and your model isn't much better. Just making false facts up.
 
Back
Top
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features and essential functions on BlackHatWorld and other forums. These functions are unrelated to ads, such as internal links and images. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock