1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

will rel canonical deindex your page?

Discussion in 'White Hat SEO' started by kauhywka, Jul 17, 2016.

  1. kauhywka

    kauhywka Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2014
    Messages:
    129
    Likes Received:
    22
    Location:
    Insidethebrain
    will rel=canonical deindex your page?
    Can I make rel=canonical url get higher then the main url and be safe for google with this tag?
     
  2. validseo

    validseo Jr. VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2013
    Messages:
    917
    Likes Received:
    527
    Occupation:
    Professional SEO
    Location:
    Seattle, Wa
    Page is a wishy washy term.... There are URLs and content. A page is a particular combination of a URL and some content. Your content (and pages) each have infinite possible URLS

    http://cnn.com
    https://cnn.com
    http://cnn.com/
    https://cnn.com/
    http://cnn.com//
    https://cnn.com//
    http://www.cnn.com
    https://www.cnn.com
    http://cnn.com#1
    http://cnn.com#2
    http://cnn.com#...
    http://cnn.com?var1=boot
    http://cnn.com?var2=toot
    ...

    Canonical URL is a strong hint for google to know the "official" URL for the content you provided. It could even be on a different site.

    So if google credits a different page for the content does Google deindex your page. No. The page is still indexed but is filtered out as a duplicate copy. You have to add &filter=0 to your search URL to put the filtered URLs back. Google filters duplicates and limits results to 2 per hostname (generally) by default.

    What you are calling "deindexing" is actually that filtering, which for all practical purposes have the same effect, but technically are different.

    If you canonical page1 to page2 you are telling google that page1 and page2 are the same page and that page2 is the official URL. In a fair and just world Google will show page2 and filter page1. But Google often doesn't usually because some other stronger signal is overriding your suggestion, like all the URLs in your navigation pointing to the other URL, or the world at large preferring the other URL, etc...

    To overcome the signal confusion you need to redirect the old URL to the new.

    Otherwise you are just trying to rank the same content twice on two different URLs.

    Hope this helps!
     
  3. ThopHayt

    ThopHayt Jr. VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2011
    Messages:
    6,713
    Likes Received:
    2,557
    If you are using canonical right it shouldn't matter. The term means that you are telling Google that there are multiple "versions" or "states" the the EXACT same page and that they should disregard all of them except the ONE for content purposes. This lets Google know you aren't running around duplicating your own content 1,000 times to inflate your page count intentionally. A good example is if you like site.com/contact.html and after you send a message it sends you at site.com/contact-success.html that looks EXACTLY the same but had a green checkbox where a message icon used to be. You canonical the success page so Google doesn't get confused. Otherwise they may start ranking the success page and ignore your contact page.

    -ThopHayt
     
  4. jstover77

    jstover77 Executive VIP Jr. VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2009
    Messages:
    2,384
    Likes Received:
    3,626
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Entrepreneur
    Location:
    Doylestown PA
    Home Page:
    I use the rel="canonical" tag where there may be a redundant page(s) that look a lot alike and provide zero benefit from an SEO standpoint. A good example would be a real estate website with thousands of listings that are separated into multiple pages.

    For example, you have the main page: .com/listings/jacksonville. The next page might be .com/listings/jacksonville=p1 and =p2 and so on. I usually like to ad the rel="canonical" tag in instances such as these, where pages may be redundant and you simply want to tell Google so. It's almost like telling them to ignore it and here is the page I want you to pay attention too. In essence, they aren't technically deindexing the page, many times they are simply ignoring it. That doesn't mean they won't index the page though.

    Not sure why you would be trying to rank a page with this tag higher than a main page. That wouldn't really make sense. Can you elaborate?
     
  5. kauhywka

    kauhywka Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2014
    Messages:
    129
    Likes Received:
    22
    Location:
    Insidethebrain
    If the main source is not from my site
    I do not want google Panda find my duplicate content
    So, I can use duplicate content with rel="canonical" tag and this page will not be deindexed

    Very interesting position, only for fun, is it possible to rank now MY page with duplicate content higher then the main :D
     
  6. jstover77

    jstover77 Executive VIP Jr. VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2009
    Messages:
    2,384
    Likes Received:
    3,626
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Entrepreneur
    Location:
    Doylestown PA
    Home Page:
    Only way to find out is to test, but I wouldn't add the rel="canonical" tag on that particular page. From everything I've tested and observed, if there are instances where content is duplicated, I usually see two ranking factors. One, the domain/page with the higher authority almost always wins out. Two, sometimes it's a matter of who get's indexed first.

    I would highly suggest testing it out and posting your conclusion. That's the only way to really know.