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SEO Hosting is complete bullshit...

Discussion in 'Black Hat SEO' started by savvypro, Jan 26, 2012.

  1. savvypro

    savvypro Regular Member

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    It was suggested that I start my own thread, to make it easy to find the info that I have posted over a few threads, which burst the SEO Hosting bubble. In doing so, it will save a lot of people: time, money and effort.

    I won't be covering any new info, just copying my existing posts as quotes and arranging them in a logical order. Although one thread that I contributed to is no longer available, so I'll have to cover the missing info here.

    If you want to see some of the original posts, take a look at the following threads (which are still avaiable):
    Let's begin...


    SEO hosting is sold as the magic bullet for all your SEO issues. The idea is valid, but no one offering SEO Hosting - actually implements what they say (but I'll show you, how to do it yourself).

    Lets start off with the basis of the whole SEO hosting sales pitch - Class C IP addresses.

    The IP address classes are defined as follows:

    Little note for the quote below:
    The first set of numbers under the class name is: starting IP address, after the "=" is the binary long form.
    The second line is the: ending IP address, followed by the binary long form, after the "=".
    The third line shows you how the IP addresses in that class are used.​
    For those who cant make heads or tails out of the above - the key is the moving: 0 - see below:

    Below I cover when Classful addressing stopped being used - when they stopped handing out IP addresses based on class. The Important bit is in blue:


    I once came across a seo hosting company once that described Class C IP addresses as being defined as the 3rd octet. In the Class quote at the beginning, you?ll see the numbers are grouped and separated by dots. Each groping is called an octet (it?s to do with the binary bits, as it?s 8 bits that are used). Example:


    [1st octet].[2nd octet].[3rd octet].[4th octet]​

    The square brackets used above, are used to make it easier to make out the dots in the example.

    The SEO hosting company, claimed right on the front page of their website, that Class C IP addresses were defined by the 3rd octet. Their thinking was as follows:

    [Class A].[Class B].[Class C].[Class D]​

    As I have shown, all the classes are defined in the first octet.

    More still to come, so please refrain from posting until I have finished. If you need to know how to do it properly - take a look at the links I provided at the top of this post.
     
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    Last edited: Jan 26, 2012
  2. savvypro

    savvypro Regular Member

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    If you already spent your money, how do you tell if you have wasted it.

    The way to do that is to get on the command line of where your sites are hosted, and run the following commands:

    For *nix (including mac) it's:
    For windows it's:
    What your looking for is the IP address, but more importantly - the subnet mask.

    If you see:

    or
    or

    If the IP address is in the Class C range, which is:
    192. 0. 0. 0 to 223.255.255.255
    Excluding the: 192.168.0.0 to 192.168.255.255 range, as it's for non internet use. ​

    If you have a Class C IP address coupled with one of the sub net masks as shown above. Then you have a real class C IP address. Anything else and you have been miss sold.
     
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  3. savvypro

    savvypro Regular Member

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    So how do you do real SEO Hosting - the bits to read are in blue:


    What follows should get you going (it's also most of the hard work, that you would have to do). Note that information was correct at the time of posting.


     
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    Last edited: Jan 26, 2012
  4. savvypro

    savvypro Regular Member

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    The google angle:

    In it's simplest form: if you stand out from the crowd, it can be easily spotted by google.

    To me, running unique name servers will cause you to stand out from the crowd. If you run small sites: use name servers that are used by thousands of other normal sites. If you run a popular site: then using your own name servers, dns servers etc. would be normal, as that's what most popular sites do.


    Below is a good example of how easy it is, to be caught out.

     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2012
  5. savvypro

    savvypro Regular Member

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    I think that should do it.

    If I have missed anything, or you have questions - feel free to post them...
     
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    Last edited: Jan 26, 2012
  6. keinehabe

    keinehabe Supreme Member

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    someone starting first year uni there :) that's was on my first year uni courses ( networking ) :) . Well most of those tech things will be really hard to understand for most of peoples . IM peoples / marketers usually aren't give most of the time a damn thing about tech aspects ! What is important for them is '' to work '' . There in hosting industry it's huge huge fight , for market share ; of course advertising makes a big difference lol like in any industry .
     
  7. savvypro

    savvypro Regular Member

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    It may be covered in uni (never went). I built and managed networks for a living. Which is why I can call SEO hosting - bull sh*t.
     
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  8. Rushdie

    Rushdie BANNED BANNED

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    great article man, kudos and rep given
     
  9. cherub

    cherub Regular Member

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    I had a feeling this was the case, after doing some digging on a couple of blog networks hosted on supposed seo hosting packages, and witnessing their subsequent deindexings.
     
  10. madoctopus

    madoctopus Supreme Member

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    SEO hosting is shit and not just because of the stuff you explained. Most SEO hosts will give you what they call C-classes but all of them will be in same B-class. In other words all IPs start with 123.456.*.* which is obviously not that natural.

    Even worse they have horrible uptime and peformance. I have withnesed 700% overload on a regular basis on seo-host.com servers and from what I have talked with others pretty much all SEO hosts have this problem of oversold/overused servers.

    I have abandoned the idea of using SEO hosting and now I am simply buying cheap shared hosting. Obviously it is the best approach even though it is significantly more expensive.
     
  11. savvypro

    savvypro Regular Member

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    Thank you and to everyone else...

    Hopefully this thread will be of use to a lot of people.

    Although the sales basis for SEO hosting may change from Class C IP address, to your own IPV6 range per site or to setup your own BGP domain* per site (good luck with that one) or a unique AS number per site. When that happens, there will be no denying that it's bull sh*t that's being sold - as the cost to do BGP by it's self (let alone an AS number which will be on top of the BGP domain), is no joke.

    Oh, and you?ll stick out like Ayers rock to google.

    For those of you without a networking background, you can?t go to your favourite domain register and register your own BGP domain or an AS number. They are in no way shape or form anywhere like normal domain names. But if you come across someone claiming they are, you can call them out on their bull sh*t.
     
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  12. asiriusthoth

    asiriusthoth Jr. VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

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    IMHO... if you are thinking about "SEO Hosting" your probably not killing it. I have never seen any proof that SEO Hosting works at all. It's only been dis-proven time after time and Google itself has said it makes no difference.

    Hosting 1 site, or hosting 200 sites on the same IP... as long as you are not cross-linking sites back and forth... you should be just fine. "SEO Hosting" hell, everyone has to sell their niche ;) Doesn't mean it's true...
     
  13. seoguru13

    seoguru13 Senior Member

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    I'd concur with you on this. The middle path I have found is in buying a shared account and get 5-10 Ip's on that account, and then move on to another host. I have about 25 domains as a part of my network of blogs, and they are spread over 4 A classes currently.

    Looks more natural, and your risk is diversified, cause even if google daddy realizes this is a blog farm, some domains still remain indexed.
     
  14. SuperNoobInc

    SuperNoobInc Regular Member

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    Sorry for bumping this 1-month old thread, i find this info extremely useful. Thank you very much.

    Just wondering, would it makes more sense going for a few different 'shared hosting' account from different hosting companies (different locations), rather than white-labeled 'seohosting'.

    I think they might come out a little more expensive, but I believe the IP range should be completely different, and nameservers and all those crap will be different too?
     
  15. savvypro

    savvypro Regular Member

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    That's the way I covered it above. ;)

    On a different note, I think this thread should be made sticky, so there isn't any need to bump it. If any mods happen to read this can you make it so as this thread will save a lot of people, a lot of hassle.
     
  16. TheMatrix

    TheMatrix BANNED BANNED

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    I'm not really a tech guy, but what you are saying is that we should aim for different 1st octet? Is that right? Or am I missing something?
     
  17. Joeblack99

    Joeblack99 Newbie

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    So lets say you want to build a small network of 10 sites, and you did this:

    1/ Register 10 accounts with 10 different hosts, one site with each.
    2/ Use whois protection on each.
    3/ Build the PR of each site.
    4/ Link to your target site from each of them.

    Bulletproof? Or amateur hour?
     
  18. savvypro

    savvypro Regular Member

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    No, the 1st octet is how the classes *were* defined .

    To do it in the way I have describe: is to basically just get hosting from different providers, which are in different networks. I've listed a starting point of providers.
     
  19. savvypro

    savvypro Regular Member

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    Steps 1, 3 and 4 are towards "bulletproof" (your definition). And the way I would do it.

    Step 2 = Amateur hour.

    I say this because I have had whois protection provided by a number of registers (including godaddy, netfirms etc) and none of them, have ever been enabled by default. So there is a short time window in which your details, show up in the whois database - until you or the provider turn the whois protection on.

    The way to really do it, is to have the domains registered by a number of different people/companies. Which would make the whole thing look natural.
     
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  20. TheMatrix

    TheMatrix BANNED BANNED

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    Oh..

    And I just forum an article with much better (no offense to OP) and illustrative explanation:

    Code:
    http://www.tech-faq.com/ip-address-classes.html
     
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