1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

How to be excellent in English ?

Discussion in 'BlackHat Lounge' started by neverblue, Nov 3, 2010.

  1. neverblue

    neverblue Newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2010
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    11
    Occupation:
    Methods Researcher
    Location:
    Spain
    hi BHW members
    i want to be excellent in English but i don't know how
    i tried go to local learning centers but all was very bad
    so i want to learning myself using any online courses or any thing else
    can any one give me advices or useful resources ?
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  2. imperial109

    imperial109 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2009
    Messages:
    499
    Likes Received:
    361
    Just read as many published books as possible. Avoid eBooks and online text, because they're not always edited.

    After some time it will become second nature, and you'll learn something interesting as well. Don't bother trying to memorize the proper sentence structure either because it won't really help you in life to know why an adjective describes a noun.
     
  3. omarabid

    omarabid Registered Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2009
    Messages:
    84
    Likes Received:
    15
    English is my third language, though, I have figured out how to get better at it. Language and writing are a muscle. The more you practice, the better you get at it.

    It took me around 2 years to be able to write well crafted articles, but getting even better is not impossible.

    1. Find Good communities: That's the first thing to do. Find good communities and blogs to read every day. Put 1-2 hours / day. You won't understand the details, especially if they are written by some kind of location specific language, but you get the whole idea and the style.
    2. Review grammar and syntax: Review your school courses. Tenses and forms, conditionals, passive voice... all that "crap". It's important that you have a solid mastery of the language basics to write fluently.
    3. Watch and listen: My recommended channels are BBC World and Aljazeera International. Listen to podcasts and videos on the web.
    4. Practice: Contribute to forums, get into the discussion and don't be afraid from being singled and turned down. Start a blog.

      That's it. It's not hard, it also won't happen in a day or two. Persistence is the key here. Good luck.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2010
  4. d4l1t0s

    d4l1t0s Power Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2009
    Messages:
    560
    Likes Received:
    290
    Occupation:
    Money Maker
    Location:
    Montreal
    Practice as much as you can
    Watch TV in English , especially the News .
    And try to practice as much as you can and the best way to do it is to go out with an english speaker GF :D
     
  5. audioman

    audioman Newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2008
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    4
    You have all the materials available in the internet. Study them, and practice. I guess that's the secret in learning a language. You'll just have to apply whatever you learned. If you have English-speaking friends, converse with them. :)

    I enrolled in a Japanese class before. It was easier to learn and speak the language when you have someone to converse to. Compared to now, I already forgotten the lessons since I haven't used the language for a very long time.

    Hope this helps.
     
  6. pisco

    pisco Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2010
    Messages:
    222
    Likes Received:
    42
    Location:
    Lisbon
    Online is not going to cut it mate, you need something like the British council or similar, and it will take a few years till you get really good.

    Spending time in UK or any other native English country helps a great deal also.
     
  7. neverblue

    neverblue Newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2010
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    11
    Occupation:
    Methods Researcher
    Location:
    Spain
    nice advice
    i also remember girl from USA told me to read News Websites because English is professional in this sites

    thanks for your helpful advices and your effort

    :) nice advice but i am not from country speak english

    yes all materials available in the internet but where i can began ?
    thanks

    British council very professional place but also very expensive and their program take 2 years ( this looooong period of time )
    i was want to go to UK and i already have UK VISA but living in UK need at least 2000 Pound/Month that is mean 4000$/month !!!
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2010
  8. QuietZorg

    QuietZorg Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2010
    Messages:
    259
    Likes Received:
    158
    If you want the most correct english, you should learn latin. for example

    I eat only when I'm hungry.
    I eat when I'm hungry only.

    Both mean different things. another example , a sign in a shop may read:

    "No Dogs Please"

    .... well my dog pleases me, he shows me loyalty and doesn't piss on my trousers...

    The point is, almost no one has excellent english! If you want excellent english you will probably need to learn latin, or at least that would help when deciding what part of the sentence comes where.I would guess less than 0.1% of people have excellent english.

    Your english is actually quite good, obviously capital letters and full stops help :p

    Try to watch classical films, read "Romeo and Juliet" , watch the movie(old version) to help understand it. Read other Shakespeare plays as well , the english is out of date but actually I think it could be useful.

    There is a very famous english grammar book, and it't thin! I forget the name, If I remember I will let you know.


    --Yes my english is not excellent.
     
  9. neverblue

    neverblue Newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2010
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    11
    Occupation:
    Methods Researcher
    Location:
    Spain
    amazing advices
    i need to make my English at least good if i can't make it excellent
    i want to understand any English word without dictionary
    i want to speak English well
    i want to write any word without mistakes
    that is all i need
    and thanks for your help
     
  10. satyawrat

    satyawrat Jr. VIP Jr. VIP

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2009
    Messages:
    931
    Likes Received:
    1,183
    Occupation:
    Hustler
    Location:
    Gurgaon
    Home Page:
    THIS!

    Reading will help you a great deal. If you have a smartphone install some kind of dictionary in it, it becomes boring to find word form a physical dictionary.
     
  11. consciousnesscreates

    consciousnesscreates Power Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2010
    Messages:
    695
    Likes Received:
    107
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2010
  12. ┼blackrat┼

    ┼blackrat┼ Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2010
    Messages:
    899
    Likes Received:
    729
    Location:
    Sewer
    Play video games.

    Seriously, I learned 70% from the resident evil series and the first metal gear solid for PS1.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 2
  13. ricaum

    ricaum Registered Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2008
    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    760
    Location:
    Brazil
    Movies and series.
     
  14. Josh116

    Josh116 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2010
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    11
    So not true.
     
  15. vlerian

    vlerian Junior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2007
    Messages:
    198
    Likes Received:
    55
    Since this is an IM forum, I should ask you this.
    What do you want to do with 'excellent english'?
    Do you have a plan to be an english teacher? :)

    English is likely my 3rd language, and there are still many to learn (if I really need to).
    I feel my english is better now (then last year for example), I gain(ed?) it by reading lots of english materials, ebook, blogs, and most importantly (in my case), forums.
    Just read and read, and you will feel it.
    I still have problems with tenses, for example, but who cares?
    I don't have a plan to write a book (I can outsource or proof read it easily, anyway).

    I can write articles in (quite) good english, at least people won't totally confuse what I'm talking about, and more importantly, the SE bot can understand it.
    Actually, I've just wrote a proposal for a client in 3000+ words, and it seems he can understand it clearly.
    I can make spun article in 3rd level (phragraph-sentence-word) if I want/have to.
    But all of those jobs can be outsourced, right?

    So, having an excellent english won't do much for me, the time i spent to learn it can be spent on other more important things. As long as I can understand any written english (I don't speak english but I read and write english, lol) and can express my idea in a degree that people can understand it, I'm good. (I hope you guys can understand this post so I won't feel totally f**ed up!)

    Then again, I'm thinking in an "IM point of view", cause we're in an IM forum.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  16. Cnotey

    Cnotey Power Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2010
    Messages:
    707
    Likes Received:
    912
    Location:
    Seattle
    Home Page:
    Good luck! English is the 2nd hardest language in the world to learn next to Chinese.

    I would read as many fiction books as possible. Read them out loud. Try taking a few pages from the books and re-writing them by hand. This will give you muscle memory.
     
  17. hatena

    hatena Registered Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2010
    Messages:
    68
    Likes Received:
    2
    Occupation:
    professional bum
    Location:
    mui mui house
    English is my third language too! I read english novels to improve my english. Believe me, after reading one whole book, you're good to go
     
  18. Ramsweb

    Ramsweb Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    1,121
    Likes Received:
    658
    Occupation:
    Internet Marketer - Self Employed
    Location:
    In front of my PC
    More than learning English at a center, one can make a vast improvement simply by speaking in English with friends. If you have a bunch of friends, just try to speak to them in English.

    Also, try to watch some good English shows on TV. This is a great way to learn English without formally sitting down to do so.
     
  19. orangeblossoms

    orangeblossoms Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2009
    Messages:
    228
    Likes Received:
    247
    THIS! Read, read, READ a lot of novels. Know why? Because after a while when you sit down to write a proper sentence, it'll either sound "right" or "off."

    This skill is only refined when you've read so many materials that it's drilled into your subconscious mind the "right" way to write and construct a sentence.

    Spelling and grammar are the foundation of a language, but don't spend too much time on it trying to be 100% perfect especially with grammar.

    You just want to make writing an unconscious skill that just FLOWS and sounds good. After all, what's the point of writing? To communicate. If it flows and the reader knows what you're saying, you've already achieved what you want.

    English is not my first language either. :)
     
  20. consciousnesscreates

    consciousnesscreates Power Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2010
    Messages:
    695
    Likes Received:
    107
    [SIZE=+2]Please do not be offended with this post it is only for learning

    T[/SIZE]he English language contains a rich array of slang words and phrases. This can be particularly seen when examining the day to day language of the average Londoner. A great many London slang terms derive from the Cockney tradition and fall into the bracket of 'Rhyming Slang'. Other terms have been introduced by the influx of other cultures into the capital. The resulting mishmash has created what academics sometimes call 'Estuary English' (after the area of the Thames Estuary), although this term is used more to describe the accent used in the area.

    [SIZE=+1]baby giraffe[/SIZE] - Rhyming Slang for 'half' of a pint of beer.
    [SIZE=+1]backhander[/SIZE] - a payment given, normally in a secretive fashion.
    [SIZE=+1]ballistic[/SIZE] - to go mad with rage. eg "He went totally ballistic".
    [SIZE=+1]banged up[/SIZE] - to be put in prison. eg "Did you hear John got banged up for that blag".
    [SIZE=+1]bangers[/SIZE] - another name for sausages. Originates from the fact that they explode when cooking if they are not pierced first. A traditional English meal is 'bangers and mash' (sausages + mashed potatoes).
    [SIZE=+1]banging[/SIZE] - a 'rave culture' term meaning exciting, powerful etc. Has replaced terms such as 'kicking' and 'slammin'. A typical example of the term being used would be when a clubber says a DJ was playing 'banging choons' (a lively full-on set).
    [SIZE=+1]banjaxed[/SIZE] - meaning drunk or stoned. eg "I feel really banjaxed". From the word 'banjax' - meaning to smash or destroy.

    [SIZE=+1]naff off[/SIZE] - a milder version off **** off. Popularised by the UK comedy serial 'Porridge'.
    [SIZE=+1]nancy boy[/SIZE] - a now seldom used term for a gay man.
    [SIZE=+1](the) nick[/SIZE] - police station, or prison. e.g.. "He got banged-up in the nick for 6 months".
    [SIZE=+1]naff[/SIZE] - a popular word meaning cheap, tacky or of poor quality.
    [SIZE=+1]naff off[/SIZE] - "go away" - e.g.. "Why don't you naff off". Can be used as a mild form of "**** off".
    [SIZE=+1]nifty[/SIZE] - slang for a 'fifty' (pound note).


    [SIZE=+1](a) night (out) on the tiles[/SIZE] - a late night out, usually drunk.
    [SIZE=+1]nipper[/SIZE] - a small child.
    [SIZE=+1]safe[/SIZE] - good, all is fine. General term used to indicate that everything is o.k.
    [SIZE=+1]salmon and trout[/SIZE] - Rhyming Slang for 'snout', meaning tobacco.
    [SIZE=+1]salt / sort[/SIZE] - the word salt means woman (esp. a 'loose' woman or sexual partner) and has been used since the 19th century. Usually pron. 'sort'. It is used in a slightly derogatory way and is nearly always prefixed by 'some old'. e.g. "Dave wasn't dahn the boozer last night, must av been out with some old sort he met the other night".
    [SIZE=+1]sausage jockey[/SIZE] - a gay man (a man who 'rides' 'sausages').
    [SIZE=+1]scarpa / scarper[/SIZE] - Rhyming Slang for Scapa Flow - to run off / leave quickly.
    [SIZE=+1]Scooby-Do[/SIZE] - Modern Rhyming Slang for 'clue'. e.g. "I 'avn't a Scooby mate".
    [SIZE=+1]scrounge[/SIZE] - to beg or sponge off of others.
    [SIZE=+1]seeing-to[/SIZE] - to perform sexual intercourse. e.g. "I'd give her a good seeing-to".
    [SIZE=+1]see you next Tuesday[/SIZE] - an very rude acronym (C U Next Tuesday). There are many more here on Riley's see you next Tuesday site.
    [SIZE=+1]Sexton Blake[/SIZE] - Rhyming Slang for 'fake'.
    [SIZE=+1]shafted[/SIZE] - to be treated badly, to be in trouble. e.g. "I'm totally shafted if I don't get that job".
    [SIZE=+1]shafting[/SIZE] - sexual intercourse. e.g. "I gave her a good shafting".
    [SIZE=+1]shag[/SIZE] - very common mildly rude term for sexual intercourse.
    [SIZE=+1]shagged-out[/SIZE] - to feel tired.
    [SIZE=+1]shitfaced[/SIZE] - very drunk. Can be abbreviated to 'faced'.
    [SIZE=+1]shit for brains[/SIZE] - term of abuse for someone of low wit or intelligence.
    [SIZE=+1]shitter[/SIZE] - common term for the anus. Can also be used as a term of frustration - i.e. "That's a real shitter". Also see "Garry Glitter".
    [SIZE=+1]shed-load[/SIZE] - a huge amount. e.g. "I've got a shed-load of dodgy stuff for sale".
    [SIZE=+1]shell-like[/SIZE] - the ear. e.g. The old phrase "Can I have a word in your shell-like ?".
    [SIZE=+1]shell-out[/SIZE] - to have to pay for, usually unexpectedly.
    [SIZE=+1]sherbert dab[/SIZE] - Modern Rhyming Slang for 'cab' (taxi).
    [SIZE=+1]sherbet / sherbert[/SIZE] - an alcoholic drink (usually a beer). Derives from the Turkish word 'sherbet' which was a cooling drink made from fruit juice. e.g. "Fancy a stroll down the pub for a few sherbets ?".
    [SIZE=+1]sherman (tank)[/SIZE] - Rhyming Slang for 'wank' (to masturbate). Normally used in it's short form. e.g. "John's been ages in the toilet. Probably gone for a sherman !".
    [SIZE=+1]sheriffs badge[/SIZE] - one of many slang terms for the anus. Thus known because of the star shaped badge of a wild west sheriff.
    [SIZE=+1]shirtlifter[/SIZE] - a gay man. Comes from the fact that ones shirt would have to be lifted before anal intercourse.
    [SIZE=+1]shoeing[/SIZE] - to give something a good 'shoeing' is to give it all you've got or to go for it. May come from a football term ? Comments ?
    [SIZE=+1]Sir Anthony Blunt[/SIZE] - Rhyming Slang for 'cunt'. Also see 'berk'.
    [SIZE=+1]skin diver[/SIZE] - Modern Rhyming Slang for 'fiver' (five pound note). Also "deep sea diver".
    [SIZE=+1]skint[/SIZE] - to have no money, penniless. Also see 'boracic' and 'potless'.
    [SIZE=+1]skirt[/SIZE] - young attractive woman. Often preceded with "a bit of". A common 'lads' term. e.g. "I never realized this was such a good place to eye skirt" or "What you need is a nice bit of skirt to cheer you up".
    [SIZE=+1]skunk[/SIZE] - a particularly strong variety of marijuana. Named so because of it's strong smell.
    [SIZE=+1]sky rocket[/SIZE] - Rhyming Slang for pocket. e.g. "He're a monkey son, stick that in your sky rocket !".
    [SIZE=+1]slag[/SIZE] - a very common word for a loose woman or generally a rough looking bird. e.g. "She is a right old slag". Used by men and women. It can also be used amongst men as an insult and can be heard in 70's and 80's police drama's ("Shut it you slaaag !").
    [SIZE=+1]slaphead[/SIZE] - a bald per son.
    [SIZE=+1]slapper[/SIZE] - a common term for a loose woman.
    [SIZE=+1]slash[/SIZE] - a very common slang term for urination. e.g. "I'm dying for a slash".
    [SIZE=+1]smeg ![/SIZE] - derived from the word smegma. Can be used as an exclamation or a euphemism for ****. e.g. "Oh smeg I forgot to post that letter !". This saying was very much popularized by the UK TV series 'Red Dwarf'.
    [SIZE=+1]smeghead[/SIZE] - an idiot, dickhead. Popularized (if not actually invented) by the UK TV series 'Red Dwarf'.
    [SIZE=+1]snog[/SIZE] - to kiss, usually with tongues. A childish word, mainly used by teenagers ("Cor, Sally got a snog off John after the disco !") or humorously by others ("Fancy a snog luv ?").
    [SIZE=+1]snout[/SIZE] - tobacco. A prison term. Derives from the fact that the smoking of banned tobacco in prison was often masked by pretending to rub the nose.
    [SIZE=+1]solid[/SIZE] - reliable, dependable (a solid geezer). e.g. "You don't have to worry about Dave, he's a solid bloke". Also another name for cannabis resin.

     
    • Thanks Thanks x 2