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A Quick Pinterest Primer for Beginners

Discussion in 'Social Networking Sites' started by whatlljk, Apr 14, 2012.

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  1. whatlljk

    whatlljk Regular Member

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    Hey all,

    I've been working on Pinterest in the last week or so, and I just want to spread some of the stuff I've picked up so far. None of it is massively groundbreaking, but I'll consider it a good consolidation of some basic knowledge that everyone working on Pinterest should be aware of. Let's get started.

    1) Know Your Demographic. This is fairly obvious to most who are already on Pinterest, but let's talk about it anyway. Pinterest is a really unique social network in that the demographics are fairly clear-cut: we're looking at women, older women, and women who have some spending money. We're not marketing to men, we're not marketing to the younger crowd here. This means NO ewhoring, NO crappy Free iPad CPA offers, NO boards scantily clad ladies (unless it has inspiring fitness quotes on it; getting to that later). What*is* this demographic looking for?
    • Household stuff. A lot of these women are older, are homeowners, and have the money to spend on this kind of stuff. Middle-aged women who have a home... well, if you've been around one, you know they care about making the house look good more than anything else. At least, that's how my own mother is.
    • Dieting and Fitness. This one is fairly obvious -- the main demographic for this kind of promotion has always been women. Pinterest is the perfect platform.
    • Clothes. Many of the biggest Pinterest accounts (measured by number of followers) post about fashion *a lot.* This is also a great niche because it's very easy to promote. You don't need to worry about CPA phonecalls or extremely long approval timeframes -- there are myriad affiliate programs out there for fashion retailers.
    • Crafts, Recipes, DIY stuff. The pins most likely to go viral are crafty DIY ones -- and recipes. Use these kinds of pins to link back to your blog, which is stuffed with Adsense and affiliate links (amazon links to kitchen supplies, craft supplies, etc. would also fit well here.)

    I won't give away EVERY niche, but start with these and extrapolate further -- just think about what this demographic wants and needs.

    2) Cloak your affiliate links, or don't direct link at all. There's been a lot of talk lately of Pinterest stripping out affiliate lnks, replacing links with their own, etc. Even if they're not actively this right now, the technology exists so that they can do it in the future -- and that INCLUDES retroactively. Keep yourself safe by making all of your affiliate links go through a redirect on your own domain, or if you must, a URL shortening service.

    Even better, if you want to REALLY build a following, don't just link directly to your products. This will take a lot more effort, but it'll pay dividends in the end. Instead make blog posts with integrated links to your products -- reviews, general commentary (good for fashion), and very picture heavy. If your content is good, you'll not only get a good clickthrough rate to your aff link -- you'll also build a following of subscribers and generate more conversions in the long run.

    3) Focus on one niche per account. I've heard conflicting advice on this -- some people say to target everything and collect followers on individual boards, and some say to focus on a niche across everything. You're free to do whichever, and I'm not necessarily convinced that one is INHERENTLY better than the other. But what has worked for ME is focusing on a niche and sticking with it. If you focus on a niche, you can work harder on attracting followers who are actually interested in what you're selling. I've found much better follow-back rates (as high as 10%) with my niche accounts. I follow people who follow other pinners in my niche, and as a result, my follow-back numbers are better. With some of my 'shotgun' approach accounts, even though I cover many more niches over many more boards, my follow back rate is only half as good. I also see better clickthroughs and better conversions on niche focused accounts.

    In a world where you can buy or create as many accounts as you want, I say go with niche ones -- it's just more efficient. And efficiency is what makes a money-making system.

    4) Make your accounts REAL. This is MASSIVELY IMPORTANT in the long-term approach to marketing on Pinterst. The temptation, which works fairly well with Twitter, Facebook, Web 2.0 for SEO, etc. is to use bots to automate everything -- just slap up a crappy storefront and go to work. This approach will not work on Pinterest. Pinners don't follow back like Twitter users do. When you add a user, they WILL look at your board before they add you back -- and they WILL see through any thin spam accounts instantly. Why would they follow you if you only have a few boards, if you only have one or two pics per board? If you've never liked any pins, despite having tons of pins on your board? Think about how a real Pinterest user would act and make your accounts look like that.

    This has a double beneficial effect, too -- think of how Pinterest would evaluate your account if they're sniffing out affiliate links. Many of the most popular Pinterest users post affiliate links -- but they're not banned, because they have huge following and post useful content while interacting with other pinners. Make your accounts the same -- pin things, repin things, comment, like stuff. DON'T just post things that make you money. Make your boards have unique titles from one another. Don't just make one account per category and leave it at that. This is what will separate the wheat from the chaff when it comes to Pinterest marketing. Don't ignore it.

    I hope this helps! Good luck, stay smart, make $$$.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 6
  2. cl880629

    cl880629 Newbie

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    Thank u
     
  3. whatlljk

    whatlljk Regular Member

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    Through my observations and testing with my own accounts so far, I honestly believe that there is a huge random element in making the category page -- I can't imagine what I've done with my personal accounts to be blacklisted, yet 85% of the time or so my first pin of the day will not appear on the category page. It seems entirely sporadic and random.
     
  4. markhenry121

    markhenry121 Elite Member

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    I have obtained very good experience with each of your advice that you have mentioned in this post. Especially, I have received massive benefits from the point of focus on only one niche in single account.
     
  5. black101

    black101 Supreme Member

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    very true, but dont forget its a new site and i have found many bugs, like the number of following is at 0 but i am following ppl, i think need to give it some time to fix everything
     
  6. whatlljk

    whatlljk Regular Member

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    Honestly, I'm looking forward to when they get a little more sophisticated. More sophistication = better idea what they're doing = more predictable = easier to exploit... which sounds like backwards logic but I think it makes sense :-D
     
  7. stevehall

    stevehall Registered Member

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    Very informative, thanks given.
    Cheers,