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Self Sufficient Music Streaming/Listening Method - Promising Start - Need Help to Refine

Discussion in 'Making Money' started by Typhoonicano, Jun 6, 2014.

  1. Typhoonicano

    Typhoonicano Newbie

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    So I've been toying around with this idea for a while, and have hit kind of a road block. While I am always reading around on BHW, I've yet to actually make an account until now. It seems like the sort of community where you can post methods and everyone gives some genuine feedback and helps create a solid method.

    So last year I had released a music album through an online distributor for $30 to send to all stores. Along with sending the music to Amazon, iTunes, etc it also sent the music to Rdio, Spotify, etc.

    Having absolutely no fan base whatsoever that I was able to get one or two album sales a month for the music, just from having a decent looking cover that seemed to draw people to listen in. I wasn't really doing the music to make money, more just because I had the songs and figured it was worth $30 to make it feel more legitimate.

    What I did discover, though, is the music streaming services actually ended up paying a lot more than the purchases. Most of the plays, initially, were from my own friends/family/self... But once those plays came and went, it had boosted my album up high enough to be "charting" on the new releases, which apparently a vast majority of the users look through to check out all of the music. On Rdio, specifically, you can see those who are listening and to how many tracks. It wasn't much.

    Once the royalties came in after the two month delay, I recognized the potential. It didn't matter what the length of the song was (for Rdio, specifically) or how many songs were on the track... essentially... a play equals a penny. (It's a little less than that on average, maybe like $.0086/play)
    I noticed the entire song did not need to be played through in order to register a "play" on Rdio's play count. I created a macro clicker to listen to 5 seconds of the track, and then would select next. I got the plays up to about 200,000 which was a majority of me, but also a few hundred users at least who saw the quickly rising album on the top charts, and I waited the two months. Unfortunately in that test I did not get paid for the skip plays, only those legitimately generated by the users.

    Back to the drawing board
    I went ahead and did a test where me and my friends recorded an album of 60 5-10 second tracks of spoken words, and released it for the $30. I then took two paid accounts ($10 a month) and put the album on repeat for about 48 hours. After the 48 hour period, I checked in on it to see that the plays drove up to almost 59,000 plays but the album was pulled off of the website and listed as unavailable. Two months later though, I had the royalties for 58,798 plays, which came to $502.87. This was at the cost of $50 (two paid accounts streaming, 1 album release).

    I was very encouraged, but disappointed that I would have to create original content each time I did this... I also can imagine that doing that even more than once would create a lot of suspicion with the distributor, as well as Rdio, and could lock out potential funds through future releases.

    I then created two albums with this same concept, except this time it was essentially a sound effects album. 60+ tracks on each album. Rdio had just released free ad-supported accounts which pay out exactly as paid account plays do, so I created a few more Rdio accounts with random email accounts, and limited the accounts to listening once per day.

    At that rate, it was roughly 125 plays per day/per account... if that process is repeated each day to alleviate suspicion, you're looking at 3750 plays per month, or a little over $30 per account. I did this for a month with a couple of accounts and ended up over the course of two months registering another 46,754 and 22,794 plays, or another $681.38 from the $60 album releases. This time, though, because of the account swapping and safe play -- those albums remained active.

    I went ahead and created two more albums to be released, which would take my total available plays between albums to 250... The distributor did issue a warning about what seemed to potentially be happening, but allowed the album to go through anyway:

    ?Store end streaming abuse? is when a store's fraud review team, in their sole judgment, determine that a particular song or album has been played an abnormally high number of times within a small number of store accounts, oftentimes thousands of streams per account. They further state that these streams can inflate an album's position within store charts and lower the overall per-stream-value of all albums within the store. As a result, streaming stores such as Spotify, Xbox music, Rdio and Rhapsody consider this a violation of their terms and conditions. Such streaming abuse also leads to significant financial losses for stores. At this point we can still give you the opportunity to release your album if you would like, however, please note that if stores contact us about streaming abuse on this release in the future, we will need to take further action. This may include but is not limited to taking down the release from all stores, and/or the withholding of any funds that are deemed fraudulently obtained. If you do not want to continue with distribution we can also fully refund your purchase for you. Please reply to acknowledge that you have read and understood the above and let me know how you would like to proceed with your release. Thank you."


    This has potential. I don't have the patience or time available to create 200 accounts and to switch through them every day to listen to the ~20 minutes of tracks each day. If this could be automated, that would be amazing. Ultimately you'd want to continue to increase your catalog and rotate albums out of play, because the more plays they amass, the higher in the ranks they are and the questions start getting raised with an album that is just rambling has 1,000,000 plays.

    That being said, a month of single play through pays for another album the next month, so a little bit of start up capital goes a long way as long as we can perfect the method without getting it shut down before it ever has a chance to breathe.

    A million plays is worth around $8600-9000. On a single album, that's definitely a tell that something is up.. but even just spreading that out over 20 albums you're only putting 50,000 plays per album, at a startup cost of $600 to distribute the 20 albums.



    I feel like I've been rambling, but as I said I've been doing this for a while, and haven't quite gotten it right yet, and am interested in getting some feedback. The way I see it, I'm sitting on over $1,000 in play money after my initial investment has been paid off... So if I can get a good idea together, I'll run at it.

    Thanks!!

    Salesreports.jpg
     
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  2. Luckys

    Luckys Newbie

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    This could work it just needs more flexibility.
     
  3. taldt

    taldt Newbie

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    "So last year I had released a music album through an online distributor for $30 to send to all stores. Along with sending the music to Amazon, iTunes, etc it also sent the music to Rdio, Spotify, etc. "=> Hello, I am doing a bit of music too, what is the name of such a service?
    Thanks
     
  4. Typhoonicano

    Typhoonicano Newbie

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    Sure thing! I honestly wasn't sure if posting links to sites like that was okay, didn't want anyone to think I was doing anything fishy.

    Tunecore is the name of the site

    They have great reporting (though that 2 month lag has slipped into 3-4 for certain services). They give details of every song, regions, countries, where sales come from etc.

    I had initially tried DittoMusic and they ended up not paying sales I know I had (because I did test purchases) even a year later they still haven't reported.

    $30 for the first year, and it's something like $50 each year after.

    Best of luck!
     
  5. funadelic

    funadelic Newbie

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    Instead of using only your own accounts you could use hacked accounts too. And even offering this idea as a service as many do with increasing fake yt views, fb followers, soundcloud plays etc.
     
  6. jaleninc

    jaleninc Regular Member

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    Hey, I just made this account, so sent me a Pm, I have some ideas
     
  7. fatboy

    fatboy Elite Member

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    Just a thought - when you were using the different accounts to listen to the clips, were they using different IP addresses, useragents etc (if they are browser based). Seems to me that may of put up a red flag that meant you got sent the warning from your distributor.
     
  8. UniQuE7

    UniQuE7 Junior Member

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    Very legit info, thanks.
     
  9. Shadexpwn

    Shadexpwn Jr. VIP Jr. VIP

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    I never knew you could get sales with music right as you start.

    My friend is 26 and made like 10 albums and it doesn't bring him much, but he loves doing it and has high quality tracks.

    He is trying to get his music out there, he isn't wildly popular, but he is trying to land a recording contract.

    I might have to send him to TuneCore, it looks like a promising service that would better help him to establish himself.

    Thanks for this.
     
  10. freshadams

    freshadams Newbie

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    I've been playing around with this concept myself.

    I decided to take an approach on Spotify. I've been making about $15 a month just running my music through one computer, charting about 2,000 plays a month.

    After doing a lot of research, I decided to up the ante to see if I could employ multiple accounts into pumping up my streams. Instead of setting up multiple fake or proxy accounts, I had a few friends run a quick macro setup through my two releases on 35 second intervals. I was hoping this would appear more realistic to admins, despite the on and off use of bots through their accounts. My tracks jumped from about 1,500 plays each to the top track hitting 13,000.

    I didn't use a method of creating short songs to boost my plays. I released all of these songs through Tunecore as legitimate songs that span about 4 minutes each. I started to run plays through Rhapsody and Rdio, but I'm waiting to see if I receive any payout for cycling through my music.

    A few days ago, Spotify ripped out my releases along with my artist page (you can't even search my artist name anymore). I sent a few emails to Tunecore and Spotify (who seemed clueless about the incident), and eventually got a similar reply from TC.

    "TuneCore was just informed that Spotify has reported multiple instances of store end streaming abuse for your release and has sense removed it from their store.

    As explained to us by Spotify, "store end streaming abuse" is when Spotify's fraud review team, in their sole judgment, determine that a particular song or album has been played an abnormally high number of times within a small number of store accounts, oftentimes thousands of streams per account. They further state that these streams can inflate an album's position within store charts and lower the overall per-stream-value of all albums within the store. As a result, Spotify considers this a violation of their terms and conditions as agreed to by the person that set up the account with them. Such streaming abuse also leads to significant financial losses for Spotify.

    Unfortunately, when we get contacted by a digital store that has determined there is fraud or illegal activity, we must comply with the stores's request to disable all deliveries to the store from the TuneCore customer who uploaded the materials. We have to ask that you do not select the Spotify store for any future deliveries as we will need to block that album or single from sale. We thank you for your understanding."

    So now I'm not expecting much of a payout, but I wish they wouldn't have removed my entire catalog. It's interesting how they cite user account violations, yet point to me as a source of fraudulent activity (which is kind of true, yeah, but I was getting plays from accounts all over town). Either way, I'd like to get my legitimate release back on Spotify, even if it means I have to release through CDBaby or another service. However, I can't believe they hit you with a warning. My whole catalog was removed without notice, so I'm hoping these dudes will give me a second chance.

    I'm still playing around with the whole Rhapsody/Rdio method. Not sure what time in a track counts as a legitimate "stream," so I'm trying out different methods to see if there's any payout.

    Obviously, in the case of Spotify, I will have to step up my game to make it look more legitimate.
     
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  11. junkball

    junkball Newbie

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    Hello! I have been wonding if this method still works with rdio's free users anf if you have developed this idea any further? And have you tried this on deezer?
     
  12. Dilemmabeats

    Dilemmabeats Newbie

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    It's pretty much impossible to keep content on the sites with using half a dozen accounts, they all have measures put in place to detect and stop streaming abuse. However, I'm pretty sure this is 100% legal, as I've been pulled off of pretty much every streaming service, but then paid a few months later. They always pay out. Sony Unlimited was a gold mine, they would let you stream one song 24/7, they couldn't care less. Sadly I didn't figure this out until 2 months before their service went under and they let spotify take over for their streaming services. The only solution I can find is to constantly release new material under new accounts, keep playlists shuffled up and refrain from just streaming 24 hours a day on one account. I've been doing this for a little over a year now. I've made about $2,400 with two albums.
    Services look at number of streams per track, in a per week basis, then they look at how many accounts have streamed it, and what regions (ip addresses) they are from. To make any real money you are going to have thousands of plays coming from a handful of accounts. I used to use Tunecore, but have switched to Distrokid. Distrokid allows for an unlimited amount of releases for one artist for a one time fee of $20. This comes in quite handy. The hard part is you just never know how close you are to getting your music pulled, so once you cross that line with one song, the distributors will pull your entire catalogue. For this reason I do about 3 releases per distrokid account, then i open a new account to try to basically partition the material and minimize the damage, when one account goes down, i don't lose the whole ship.
     
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  13. julianthr

    julianthr Jr. VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

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    This is gold! Thanks for this information OP! I have a few tracks that I can put together to make an album so Im gonna give it a try! But I think Im not gonna push it too much with fake accounts. FUCK LABELS!
     
  14. JohnathanQuincy

    JohnathanQuincy Registered Member

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    Hey! (formerly Typhoonicano, forgot my login email... doh) Glad you are going to be getting some use out of this. Honestly, I'd been having some troubles getting it started up again as I'd been working on other things, but one of the comments above is a really awesome nugget of information.

    Distrokid allows you to have unlimited albums up under a single name, for $20 a year. I had been considering working on an angle of doing essentially a podcast (about anything, really, IM or movie reviews, or something) and breaking that up into short 30 second segments - so if it were movie reviews, doing a track per movie and rambling for 30+ seconds.

    I figured that would be quick content, and you could work on building the amount of tracks, instead of the amount of accounts/listening.

    It's a big exaggerated, but there's something really odd about someone listening to the same CD 2000 times in a day, 30 days in a month. But it's not really as noticeable if that person only listens to each track once - but there just so happens to be 2,000 individual tracks available to listen to.
     
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