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Record Label Journey

Discussion in 'My Journey Discussions' started by CrimsonSteel, Aug 27, 2016.

  1. CrimsonSteel

    CrimsonSteel Newbie

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    I've been making money online using various methods for a while. I've worked on Odesk before it was Upwork, done graphic design, content writing, composed songs for soundtracks, use various Black Hat methods like monetizing one of the blog posts on my satire site. After spinning my wheels and not making nearly as much as I had wanted to, I've decided to focus all of my efforts on the record label I started in late 2013.

    The music genre is predominantly synthwave. But fans of movie soundtracks (horror and sci-fi), metal, psytrance, space rock and progressive rock would all enjoy this stuff. So basically this is a niche within a niche within a niche, because the main "twist" of the label is this -

    Every release on my record label is tied together by a narrative. Each album is a concept album, each compilation is a concept compilation, and they all have their own stories that oftentimes cross paths. The releases are supplemented with concept art and short stories that further flesh out the saga. It's a universe that grows and expands with each release.

    I have huge hopes for this to be a legitimately well-known franchise. Not saying Star Wars level huge, but one can dream, right? If Angry Birds can become a global phenomena and get a CGI movie, why can't I take my love of prog rock concept albums and rock operas and shove it in a blender with lore with as much depth as A Song of Ice and Fire and brutality of Mortal Kombat, filled with dangers that lurk in 70s and 80s horror and sci-fi flicks, and create a cohesive universe that is financially beneficial?

    Here's my plan of attack as of late. (I just returned to the project after a hiatus.)

    - The official website that is tied to a domain. Bought a pro Wordpress theme and tweaked it to my liking. I plan on regularly making blog posts (2 or 3 a week) and optimizing them for a variety of keywords in line with synthwave, cyberpunk, horror, and anyone that has worked with me on this project, be it a musician, graphic designer, or writer.

    - My solo albums are all released on multiple platforms. The compilations are only on Bandcamp. Bandcamp sales completely eclipse Spotify, iTunes, Amazon, Google Play, revenue. (And the host of others.) I have a station on Pandora radio. Only my first album is submitted - gotta submit my other albums soon.

    - Shorts stories to be self-published digitally. These were originally free downloads alongside the albums, but I'm going in and completely revamping them from the ground up. As I update and essentially rewrite these stories, I am building a database of universe information within my website both as a guideline to follow and as a source of information for fans. I need to figure out a way to properly organize this lore and make it engaging and entertaining.

    - Youtube site with a pathetic 48 strong subscription base. It is monetized. 57,647 views overall. Have no idea how to build this up, never really took Youtube seriously. I now plan on uploading each song off every single one of my albums and my labels compilations to Youtube, optimizing them, and linking them to sales. Obviously add the sales tag right on the video.

    - Two Facebook pages - my solo music page (right under 1,000 followers) and the page for the Label itself (only 400 followers). I'm pretty bad at Facebook. Ever since they introduced the paid promotions, I've pretty much abandoned it. I remember some friends of mine had gotten 300,000 fans on their band page. They used to have 1,000's of likes for every post they made, with 100s of comments. Now they're lucky to break 100 likes and 15 comments...and they have even more followers now than ever. Is Facebook even worth fucking with?

    - Maybe sell the concept art I'm making on some sort of automated "prints" website? Might be overkill.

    - Physical releases of all this content (CDs, Vinyl, album covers as posters, shirts, etc.) seem unnecessary to me at this point until I see a digital demand for getting it made. As in, I want to see DAILY SALES streaming in before I'll ever find physical merchandise necessary.


    So right now I have a shit ton of content, and am looking to make this franchise something HUGE, something to be reckoned with. The idea itself is something entirely unique, as far as I know. Album sales are not nearly as consistent as I would like - I fully expected to have multiple daily sales by now. But I have only just recently (less than two weeks) turned my focus towards making something out of this. The project has been launched since 2013, and this is sort of a post-hiatus "Phase 2.0" where I stop busting my ass on affiliates and just use my OWN products as the affiliate.

    If anyone has any thoughts or tips feel free to share.
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2016
  2. washand

    washand Regular Member

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    Interesting!
     
  3. blogzandstuff

    blogzandstuff Elite Member

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    shame pandora is not for outside of the US though
     
  4. CrimsonSteel

    CrimsonSteel Newbie

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    I'm not sure if it's really brought my label many sales, though. I didn't realize it was regulated just to the US though, that's whack.

    Most music sales / streaming sites take 6 months to report earnings, so far all I know one of my albums could be a smash hit on iTunes or something. I highly doubt it though.
     
  5. blogzandstuff

    blogzandstuff Elite Member

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    i think it's a new problem they have, like so many artists are complaining about earnings from streaming because they pay such small amounts
     
  6. CrimsonSteel

    CrimsonSteel Newbie

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    Streaming sites pay out very little. So does every method, really, until you can break into the "elite" spectrum. I see other labels in my genre getting hundreds of sales on every release. I want to reach that elite status, then use the money to further expand the project. Some times it's hard to get great content out there. People will be more enthusiastic about a meme I crap out in 10 minutes then a record label that is a continuous story tied together with music, art, and novellas. Pretty absurd, really.
     
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  7. blogzandstuff

    blogzandstuff Elite Member

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    unfortunately that is very true, if i remember this week a UK record was broken when a group went to number one on the album charts with the lowest album sales ever in the history of the UK chart
     
  8. CrimsonSteel

    CrimsonSteel Newbie

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    I could probably just start DJing weddings and hosting a weekly karaoke event and make way more money than learning a series of instruments and self-producing albums. But I'd rather make pennies working on a passion than feeling like a rat in a cage playing top 40 hits for $400.
     
  9. blogzandstuff

    blogzandstuff Elite Member

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    that is true, there are many artists who sell huge amounts of Albums like Enya for example. Once you have a good sized following other artists will want to work with you, i know session musicians who have worked with some of the biggest names out there and tour the world but you wouldn't know who they were
     
  10. seogiantking

    seogiantking Power Member

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    Unique and different journey.