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Question about "mispelling" domain name

Discussion in 'Domain Names & Parking' started by briptech, Feb 11, 2013.

  1. briptech

    briptech Power Member

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    Hello, a client of mine with a very well known firm in his country is going to register a bunch of new domain names to protect their brand.

    The obvious thing I will do on their behalf will be to register brandname.com .org .net .info .biz .eu etc.

    They asked me: what about mispelling version of the name? Is it suggested to acquire many possible variation(s) of our names?
    For example: brandname.com, brandnam.com, brndname.com, brandnme.com, etc.

    In your opinion, is there any online tool to generate many possible mispelling variations by starting from a given brand name?
     
  2. evilclown

    evilclown Senior Member

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    While this is a good way to protect a brand, I will won't further than the actual brand name, from hat point forward get a TM on the brand and done. Misspells would be a waste of time and money.
     
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  3. Nigel Farage

    Nigel Farage BANNED BANNED

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    If the brand is well-known, they can take the domain name of any other business that uses it. Try running a site named "jcpenny.biz" and see what happends. It might be prudent to take the .org and .net, but I wouldn't worry about any of the others. If someone comes along and tries it, and they get noticed, it should be no problem shutting down the site and actually seizing the domain.

    However, the misspellings are an opportunity. You might do some market research to find out what the most common misspellings are , and buy a few of those, set up basic websites with 301 redirects to the main site, and then do some pyramid link building.

     
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  4. briptech

    briptech Power Member

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    Thank you guys, for your opinions.

    Is there any known online tool to check (suggest) the most common misspellings?
     
  5. Furious George

    Furious George Supreme Member Premium Member

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    I would think of obvious typos. like gacebook dot com

    People can't even spell misspell :) I think it would be hard to predict specific spelling errors. I like the trademark idea the best. Otherwise this could get very expensive.
     
  6. Nigel Farage

    Nigel Farage BANNED BANNED

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    It appears Ron Paul is attempting to do this:

    http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2013/02/11/ron-paul-files-suit-for-domain-name-leaving-supporters-bummed-but-fighting/

    After I read the article, I think the domain name registrants should have sold that name at auction the day he announced his retirement. He is obviously taking it because the current domain name owners are no longer of any use to him in politics (he just retired). So now he's looking at ways of generating income without having to do too much work. As is everyone here. So Paul's position is understandable.

    What would the domain owner's do with the site after his retirement? I can only think of 2 things:

    1) Use Paul's name and reputation in order to make money for themselves.
    2) Use the same in order to wield some kind of political influence, without Paul having any power or role in it. Imagine some website, "yourname.com" publicly announcing all of positions on issues, with never even consulting with you.

    So, as much as I'd like to be on the side of the people that developed that website, they should have seen this coming. They couldn't possibly expect that they were going to be allowed to use someone else's name for either financial gain or political influence. But, what they COULD have done, is put the Domain Name up at auction, gotten maximum, fair market value for it, and let the new owner's deal with all the problems of the upcoming dispute. Paul might have even been the top-bidder at auction. Purchasing the domain name could have been the cheapest way to acquire it, as it is certain he is paying legal fees to assert his "international legal rights (;)).
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2013