1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Private Amazon proxies

Discussion in 'Proxies' started by benny>>, Jan 3, 2012.

  1. benny>>

    benny>> Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2010
    Messages:
    78
    Likes Received:
    24
    Occupation:
    Teacher
    Location:
    Australia
    Not sure if this merits a thread, but this is an easy way you can create a series of super fast private proxies, through amazon, cheaply (Type "ec2 free tier pricing" into google and you'll see how cheap / free it is)



    Create proxies:


    1. Join Amazon's AWS.

    2. Follow these steps:

    First watch this video up until 3:30 ish:

    (can't post URLS type "Create a Personal VPN server on the Amazon Cloud (EC2)" in google and go to video)


    MAC USERS: Stop once you've logged into the SSH (video explains how to do this) and go to step 3.

    WINDOWS USERS FOLLOW THESE STEPS:

    2a. Download putty and putty gen at:

    (Can't post URLs type "putty download" in google and go to first result.

    With the PEM file that was downloaded by following the steps in the video, run it through PuTTyGEN to convert it to a .PPK file.

    2b. Runny PuTTy.exe.

    2c. In the box that says host name add the address the guy shows in the video. Leave the port setting as is.

    2d. From the list to the left, expand/select "connection" and then expand "SSH" which should be underneath it

    2e. Click on SSH and click the browse button to the right on the page that comes up.

    2f. Select your created PEM file.

    2g. Go back to Session from the list on the left and select "open"


    3. Install Squid proxy server:

    Type the following line into the window that appears (after connecting through PuTTy or in the terminal window you have open after connecting if you're on a MAC) and hit "y" and enter if prompted:

    Code:
    sudo apt-get install squid

    Then type:

    Code:
    sudo pico /etc/squid/squid.conf

    Hit enter when the program launches and type out the following changing the IP address to your IP address:

    acl a src 123.456.789.123
    http_access allow a

    When you're done hit the following key combos:

    ctrl + o

    Enter

    ctrl + x

    Finally type the following:

    Code:
    sudo /etc/init.d/squid restart
    


    Create multiple proxies easily:


    Now that you've done this, go back to your AWS control panel and select the EC2 tab.

    Check the box next to your instance then find a button that says "Instance Actions" above.

    Press the button and from the list select "Create Image (EBS AMI)"

    It'll prompt you for a name, type in anything and make the image.

    Click the "view image" link in the box that appears and wait a bit while the image is created. It takes a fair bit, refresh every now and then.

    When finished, check the box next to the image you created and press the "Launch" button. Find the "number of instances" box and type in as many proxies as you like.



    To use these proxies


    To use these proxies in the tradition IP:pORT way, simply copy their public DNS (see video), remove the "-" dashes from the number and replace with "." or periods then add a ":" colon at the end and use the port 3128. E.g.:

    122.213.234.52:3128

    You now have as many private proxies as you like.

    I suggest only keeping the instances behind the proxies on when you're using them to save your free hours of usage per month. To turn a proxy off, select "Shutdown" from the "instance actions" list.

    If their is any interest in this, I'll create a little python script that automatically shuts down and turns on your proxies. If this is useful, feel free to rep.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2012
  2. lodious

    lodious Newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2011
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    8
    Occupation:
    hi bluecollar technical
    Location:
    north america
    Being the noob that I am I have to ask isn't the reason for proxies is so your untraceable to your origination point and wouldn't az have rcrd of incoming ips? Others this looks like a real cool idea...
     
  3. benny>>

    benny>> Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2010
    Messages:
    78
    Likes Received:
    24
    Occupation:
    Teacher
    Location:
    Australia
    It depends what you're doing with those proxies.

    All private proxies will be traceable to you at the end of the day. No one gives them away for free. You can fudge things by signing up to Amazon or a private proxy provider with an anonymous credit card but you're only adding a layer of abstraction. It can, at the end of the day, be penetrated.

    The good thing with this method is that you can write a script that will change all your IPs and turn off / turn on your amazon instances.

    Theoretically, you could turn on 10 instances, run an SB session, then turn them off. You have 750 free hours of usage a month, or 75 hours a month if you use 10 proxies / instances. If enough interest I'll post a script like this.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2012
  4. rayofvictory

    rayofvictory Newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2012
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    When you say Python script, are you referring to Boto interface? Can you post a snippet of code that can slightly automate the instance start/shutdowns?

    Repped!

    sudo /etc/init.d/squid restart is prompting an error asking to use something like this : service squid restart which isn't working either.
    Code:
    $ sudo /etc/init.d/squid restart
    Rather than invoking init scripts through /etc/init.d, use the service(8)
    utility, e.g. service squid restart
    
    Since the script you are attempting to invoke has been converted to an
    Upstart job, you may also use the stop(8) and then start(8) utilities,
    e.g. stop squid ; start squid. The restart(8) utility is also available.
    squid stop/waiting
    squid start/running, process 1110
    $ service squid restart
    restart: Unable to connect to system bus: Failed to connect to socket /var/run/dbus/system_bus_socket: No such file or directory
    
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2012