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How to start making money with CPA

Discussion in 'CPA' started by cuiicasquerunbee83, Mar 6, 2017.

  1. cuiicasquerunbee83

    cuiicasquerunbee83 Newbie

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    I have multiple CPA account with peerfly, neverblue etc. but can't seem to make any money with them, I really need your help, thanks
     
  2. tommyvang

    tommyvang Power Member

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    There's plenty of cpa method here on this forum. Search for it
     
  3. eMonetize

    eMonetize Regular Member

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    I have been doing CPA / affiliate marketing for over 16 years.

    More technically, I monetize 3rd party data (email) using PPL offers. This is for a couple key reason.

    I promote PPL (pay per lead...lead generation) offers because there is no credit card / purchase required to complete an offer. it is far easier and less work to get someone to fill out a short form than it is, to take out their credit card and purchase something. So conversion rates are typically much higher compared to offers that require a sale to be made.

    I generate traffic to the offers by acquiring fresh / targeted 3rd party data. This is because I'm building assets that I then own and can market to over and over at low cost and I own/control the traffic. Where most marketers pay for traffic, which often just results in failing to turn a profit unless they have a proven funnel or the use some free traffic strategy that more than not, isn't worth the time that it takes to implement.

    So with the combination of the two, basically I'm monetizing the data using PPL offers because they offer the path of least resistance to get conversions and convert the data into cash producing assets.

    I favor offers that have a make, get or save money benefit. This is what has overall worked best for me and tends to have the greatest amount of mass appeal (will be of interest to a large general audience). So the potential to generate high volume of leads exists and cross promoting offers on the back-end is fairly easy.

    Some verticals that I have done extremely well with are: insurance, debt, credit, education, mortgage, loans, assistance, discount offers, homeowner offers, etc...

    If you're not familiar with 3rd party data, it is simply email data that the users have provided permission to receive messages from third parties. So it is 100% can-spam compliant and has nothing to do with spamming. I either purchase the data or I get it through rev-share deal. Rev-share (revenue-sharing) is data that you get upfront for $0 cost and then split the revenue generated from sending it, with the data provider.

    Everything starts with the data and what vertical the users have requested information about or shown an interest in and sending a relevant offer. So if I'm getting data for auto insurance, then I send an auto insurance offer to the users. If I'm getting data for education, I send them an education offer, etc...

    This type of data is rarely going to be as responsive as a highly targeted opt-in list that you develop yourself. This is not an issue because it is much cheaper and highly scalable, compared to list building.

    The key to making it work is to always be segmenting your openers / clickers - removing unresponsive users. That way over time you will be building smaller but more responsive list that you should eventually be able to send less and make more when mailed. Essentially you are converting the data from quantity to quality.

    Obviously, there is far more to it, but done right it can be extremely profitable. Everyone that I know that is in the business and knows what they are doing, for the most part, does 6-7 figures. While that may seem like a huge range, much comes down to one's ability to scale and effectively build / manage the infrastructure needed to scale.

    It's not for everyone, but something to think about.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 4