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How to Respond to this Email by a Potential Client

Discussion in 'Offline Marketing' started by udt89, Oct 2, 2013.

  1. udt89

    udt89 Regular Member

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    Been going back and forth with this guy for almost three weeks. He placed a CL ad for someone to work in his office. Before I made him a proposal he said he was interested in other methods besides having an in house employee. I quoted him low, $1200, but I'm ok with it since its my second client.

    I can tell the guy is sold, but he's an older gentleman and in a professional service field. From what I gather he wants me to tell him what im doing, which I would never not even for $10000/month. Plus, the proposal offered him redesign of his two horrendous, mistake ridden, non SEO optimized websites free of charge for a 6 month commitment. The proposal was a hybrid of my own words and the proposal Taktical gave out. His previous SEO work has been unpaid college interns doing stuff he read about online or paid for from some crappy "authority site".

    I thought the deal was fair, but here is his response:


    Hi, I received you proposal and appreciate all of the effort that you put into it, If you recall, I placed a job offer for someone to work in my office. I like to be in control, and have an employer-employee relationship. This way I am not committed to a particular program. I thought that this was clear in the add, and that you were making a proposal of the work that you want to implement. The job offer is still open. Hours are flexible to fit your schedule. If you are still interested, I would very much like to work with you. You seem experienced and knowledgeable. Please let me know what you think.
     
  2. LaLore

    LaLore Regular Member

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    These words stand out... "CONTROL" and "NOT COMMITTED". Honestly, sounds like he would make a terrible employer and even worse client.
     
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  3. cyberpowerpc

    cyberpowerpc Registered Member

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    What do you expect, its CL... I actually didn't see that part I was going to ask you, did you get this email from CL? lol
     
  4. udt89

    udt89 Regular Member

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    He posted a job for seo work on his site. I replied that I do it outsourced and showed examples of a current client in same industry.

    The samples speak for themselves.

    I agree with Lalore probably more trouble than it's worth.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2013
  5. g_bot

    g_bot Newbie

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    You should probably remove the text and display his email as a screenshot instead.
     
  6. udt89

    udt89 Regular Member

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    Why? He's not savvy enough to find it. Trust me.
     
  7. Tactician

    Tactician Registered Member

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    I would play hard to get. Go with an email ending with 'all the best' or 'good luck in your search' and content pretty much saying that you are self-employed/independant and working in house would be exposing your business techniques which you've refined over soso months.
     
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  8. Duffers5000

    Duffers5000 Elite Member

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    Top SEO headhunters dont go looking for talent on craigslist........it is what it is a guy looking to pay someone $1200 a month to sit in an office and do some work,pick up supplies, make coffee. If its not for you he will find someone.
     
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  9. djlance

    djlance Jr. VIP Jr. VIP

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    Your biggest obstacle will be changing his mindset which will be nearly impossible since he's old school and wants to watch you work. Maybe you should tell him it's $100 per hour and work 2-4 days per month in his office. After a month or 2 he might feel more comfortable letting you work from home once you've delivered results. This way you'll have more to bargain with, since he won't want to lose you.

    It's not ideal, but if you only have 1 other client you may want to consider it.
     
  10. udt89

    udt89 Regular Member

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    If this was my only income I would consider it. But I have a full time career
     
  11. originalposter

    originalposter Jr. VIP Jr. VIP

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    I disagree with some comments here, but I understand everyone has their own perspective.

    For me, I will say it depends on how much you want to grow your 'side business' or 'freelance reputation'.

    If you are just starting out, you just have to suck it up. That's the only way to grow. Unless you are already well-known in the industry, you don't really get to pick much.
     
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  12. udt89

    udt89 Regular Member

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    I agree originalposter

    fir me the commute would be 45 min each way and to be honest I don't want to work with this guy breathing down my neck.

    I have shown him a years worth of proven results from a client in his exact industry averaging 7-9 new customers a month. I don't think anything I do in person will make a difference
     
  13. djlance

    djlance Jr. VIP Jr. VIP

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    That's how you should respond.
     
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  14. Getwhatchuwant

    Getwhatchuwant Jr. VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

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    I would just tell him I am not interested. Unless he is paying the hell out of you its not worth it.
     
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  15. Techxan

    Techxan Elite Member

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    He is not worth having as a customer at twice the price. He will never be happy with your work. Actually working for him would be hell.
     
  16. pennya08

    pennya08 Newbie

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    I agree completely. It will drive this control freak nuts and that's when you will see his true colors. I have worked for people like this before and as many others have commented, he will never be satisfied and will squeeze all he can out of you for as little as possible. Problem with people like this is they will portray they know so much, try to undermine you and take full advantage if you are not on your toes.
    Steer clear or charge him triple.
     
  17. EMP1R3

    EMP1R3 Registered Member

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    I've worked in-house for a plastic surgeon... Go for Salary > Hourly or you're going to be bored out of your mind for 5 out of the 8 hours per day. I was working full-time (40 hrs/week) at 32.50/Hr. Which isn't a bad hourly wage, but 5 of those 8 hours were working on my own projects ;)


    There are many pro's and con's but DO NOT cut yourself short.. If he wants you in-house go for at least 60k a year salary, or more.

    The contacts in press and media (as well as bloggers, writers, etc.) I have made over that time-span have been essentially crucial to my growing business.

    - EMP1R3
     
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    Last edited: Oct 8, 2013