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How to identify "Buying key phrases"?

Discussion in 'Making Money' started by tbootz, Feb 22, 2009.

  1. tbootz

    tbootz Regular Member

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    The past week or so I have been toying around with some SEO tactics that I have been picking up and just experimenting with them for the first time. Within 30 minutes I was on the front page of the big G for a low competition keyword and by the next day I had 3 sites on page one and 2 on page 2 using no tools. The competition is low so I didn't make any money (yet), but I just wanted to test to see if I could rank using certain tactics.

    Now that I know I can I'm looking to target the niche's where there is actual money to be made. We all know how important "buying key phrases" are because targeting those specific keywords cuts our work in half and provides us with much higher conversions, but I'm having a hard time understanding how to identify or even define a "buying" keyphrase as opposed to a browsing keyphrase.

    I've identified the following modifiers as indicating commercial intent:
    -Keywords including brand name and/or model number.
    -Keywords with the obvious modifiers "buy", "quote" "cost" and "where/location" (I'm sure there are others, this isn't meant to be exhaustive, you get the idea)

    Products that may elicit an emotional or impulse buy from the buyer are important -however how do we know the potential searcher isn't just browsing for information/reviews etc on the product or comparison shopping and how do we identify the searcher as having made the decision and ready to buy?

    I don't want to be doing too much preselling when the searcher could be simply hopping from one page to the other (and in the process, erasing my affiliate cookie), I want the searcher who has already done their research and is ready to buy or is very likely to convert.

    Does anyone have any tips as to how to tell apart buying keyphrases from browsing keyphrases?
     
  2. Sweetfunny

    Sweetfunny Jr. VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

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    Use Commercial Intent tools:

    Code:
    http://adlab.microsoft.com/Online-Commercial-Intention/Default.aspx
    Not sure how accurate it is, i use my own in-house stuff for this.
     
  3. Yukinari84

    Yukinari84 Elite Member

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    Tbootz - You're on the right track. Another good way to distinguish the 2 types is to try to think like your target customer.

    Put yourself in their shoes. If you wanted to buy "product x" online, what would you type into Google?

    If you think about what your customer wants and not what you think sounds/looks good, you'll get better at it.
     
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  4. WizGizmo

    WizGizmo Super Moderator Staff Member Premium Member

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    Right on, Yukinari! . . . That is exactly how I do it. Just think the way a "buying customer" types in a search for a product. Use "buying" keyword modifiers like:

    - Best price for (product name)

    - (Product Name) Review

    - (Product Name) Bonus

    etc., etc.

    Cheers! - "Wiz"
     
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  5. Yukinari84

    Yukinari84 Elite Member

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    Great add-on Wiz.

    Other good modifiers:

    - [PRODUCT NAME] + scam

    - [PRODUCT NAME] + sale

    - [PRODUCT NAME] + coupon

    - [PRODUCT NAME] + discount

    - [PRODUCT NAME] + buy

    - [PRODUCT NAME] + want to buy

    - [PRODUCT NAME] + purchase
     
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