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How do I turn myself efficiently to the Black Side?

Discussion in 'Black Hat SEO' started by TheTyper, Aug 4, 2017.

  1. TheTyper

    TheTyper Registered Member

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    HI there, my IM experience is blogging and Youtube, all white hat, most spammy thing I do is FB groups.
    Just My IP, some google accounts, and that.

    So, my question:

    How do I begin to Spam and post in mass and not get my "true" accounts within suspenssion possibilities?
    Is my IP what I should be protecting?
    Is my IP static?
    If it´s not static, what will the difference be?

    I am new at this so my answers are, whitout kinda knowing what I am talking about:

    # VPN: what it exactly does? I've seen one in freebies section. It´s a new ip or just encryption?

    # Proxies: yeah, I know its a paid service and it´s configured in your browser.
    If I buy one, am I getting a new ip from which location?
    It's a residential IP? A shared IP? Confussed here.
    Which proxies should I use to spam? Burners? Free?

    # TOR: Can the onion browser be used for BlackHat?

    # Other Options you propose to explain to the BHW Community.

    Experienced users required here to leave everyday work knowledge, that would be much appreciated. Thanks, have a good day.
     
  2. MatthewGraham

    MatthewGraham Regular Member

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    Great. What's your actual end goal here? Presumably not spamming for the sake of spamming. Trying to grow a YouTube channel? Or your YouTube/FB pages link to affiliate sales for something else? Or you sell a product through those? Ad revenue?

    What do you mean by spam? Like post a lot of things on social media? The question is a little open ended. In general, these things are good to keep in mind when you're making separate accounts that you want to keep unassociated from each other:
    • Most basic things
      • Use different IP addresses
      • Use different verification email addresses
    • Other things that may be used in anti-spam filters:
      • Use different verification phone numbers
      • Different names
      • Different addresses
      • Different browsers when logging into the accounts
      • IPs geolocated to different locations
      • IP quality - (Ex: data center proxies vs. residential proxies -- https://www.iplocation.net/proxy-check)
      • User behavior - does the user act like a robot or a human (if you're actually a human this is less relevant)
      • Use settings/preferences
      • User account age
      • Etc.

    Among other things, yes. If you have profitable YouTube accounts, for example, and you made those from the IP address 170.28.55.199 (or whatever), then if you make a new YouTube account from the same 170.28.55.199 IP address, YouTube will be able to tell that they are associated (or at least strongly suspect that they are associated). If one of those accounts starts violating the YouTube TOS and gets banned, YouTube may then either automatically ban the other one or at least put a red flag on that account to be scrutinized more heavily.


    Probably. As in your home IP address? Yes, it generally does not change. You can check your current IP address here:
    https://www.google.com/search?q=wha...9j69i65j0l4.2903j1j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

    It should be noted that you may have logged into those YouTube/other accounts from multiple IPs, though. For example, if you connected to your YouTube account from your phone's data plan, then that would be a different IP address. Phone using your home wifi network would be the same IP. IP is the wireless connection, not the device used to connect.

    That would mean that your IP changes regularly. That happens sometimes with, for example, the IP that you're using when you connect to a phone's data plan / 4G network.

    These threads explain the difference between proxies/VPNs pretty well:
    https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-difference-between-a-proxy-and-a-VPN
    https://www.blackhatworld.com/seo/what-is-difference-in-using-proxies-vs-vpn.875795/

    Yes, you would be getting access to a new IP. Location varies. Ask the seller or see what the specify in their thread. Lower-quality data-center proxies are generally from an assortment of major cities (Chicago, Dallas, etc.). Many sellers offer geotargeted proxies. If you want/need those, you might look for those specifically.

    Some sellers offer residential IPs, some offer bulk data center IPs, some offer private proxies, some offer shared proxies, etc. Check the sales thread or contact the seller. Residential IPs and private proxies are generally more expensive; data center IPs that are shared are generally cheaper.

    You might also want to note that there are rotating proxy options (giant pool and your IP changes every 5/10/15/other minutes or similar) and also static options (seller gives you access to a set number of proxies and you can choose which one to connect to. For example, you get 10 proxies/IPs and can use those however you want indefinitely).

    The best choice for any particular project depends on what you're trying to do.

    Depends what you're doing. There are many kinds of spam that would require different approaches. For example, most free proxies are banned or red flagged for account creation, which makes it difficult to spam with those.

    If you want burner proxies, you might look into something like a service that offers a massive rotating pool of proxies. They would be shared with other users who pay for the same service, so they aren't the best proxies in the world generally, but you can get a lot of them for very cheap since they're rotating

    You might also look into proxy quality. It's generally easy to check if an IP is a proxy / located in some massive data center or if it's a more natural residential IP address.
    https://www.iplocation.net/proxy-check

    For some things, yes. That's kind of like asking if a whisk can be used for cooking. If you're on TOR, it's very easy for a website to tell that you're on TOR, as there is a public list of all TOR exit nodes (the IPs that you are routing your traffic through). See here:
    https://check.torproject.org/cgi-bin/TorBulkExitList.py?ip=1.1.1.1

    With that said, it's very useful for remaining anonymous for free. There is a lot you can do with that. But, it's also obvious that you're on a proxy, which puts you under scrutiny.

    Mostly covered above. It's easier to make a recommendation if there's more detail about the exact type of project you're trying to do.
     
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