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difference between cloud server and dedicated server?

Discussion in 'Black Hat SEO' started by flyingbear, Feb 15, 2012.

  1. flyingbear

    flyingbear Junior Member

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    function wise, are they the same, or at least very similar?

    why cloud is so cheap?


    thanks
     
  2. whiteli0n

    whiteli0n Junior Member

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    Lol clouds are usually only for storage of digital items. Dedicated servers are actual PHYSICAL (not virtual) machine that is hosted off site for you to remote into and control as you please.

    Two totally different types of products. You may be able to use programs in a "cloud" through the use of terminal services. Citrix does this with Quickbooks and other things but it aint cheap lol

    The word "cloud" is a joke. Its just a hard drive somewhere on the internet with files like EVERYTHING else on the internet.
     
  3. flyingbear

    flyingbear Junior Member

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    but I'm looking at softlayer, it looks like their cloud server is a virtual server. function wise, it seems no difference from the dedicated server, you can RDP/install software/.... maybe I'm wrong?
     
  4. meatro

    meatro BANNED BANNED

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    Cloud is just a term, in most computer courses/books the internet is depicted as a cloud. That's the cloud, the internet.

    Cloud hosting is mainly for file storage and you'll get better information if you look for content delivery networks (CDN). Your hosting company will use a network of computers (usually worldwide) that all host your files. The idea is, your files are always available.. If one goes down, there are plenty others to step up and serve your files. Also, speed is another benefit.. Downloading from a server in China is slow if you're in the USA. But if that site uses a CDN, chances are they have a mirror in the USA to serve their files faster.

    However, since it's a network, you're usually not going to be able to run scripts because that requires a stable platform (such as Windows/Linux). Imagine trying to get your work and home computers to mirror each other so that you're using the exact same everything on both.. I'm sure it's possible, but it's not going to be fun to do. So a CDN is most often used for hosting stuff like images, archives, documents, etc.

    It's cheap because you're only paying for the resources you use. You're not paying for building and maintaining a network of servers around the world. You're paying for the RESOURCES that you use by using that CDN... Sort of like, if you wanted to download something to my computer and send it to somebody. How much would I realistically charge you for the bandwidth, RAM and CPU that you use?

    If you are unsure, you can see how a CDN works here.. http://www.coralcdn.org, Coral CDN is a free content delivery network. The map on their homepage shows that they have access to over 260 servers worldwide. Of course you can get much better functionality from something legit like Amazon S3, but CoralCDN is still very good (and a cool little trick.)

    To use CoralCDN, simply attach "nyud.net" to the hostname of the file you want to mirror. For example:

    http://rarsoft.com.nyud.net/rar/winrar-x64-410.exe

    Once that URL is accessed, that file will be in the CDN and hosted to users from whichever server is closest/fastest FOR THEM.

    A dedicated server on the other hand is an actual computer that you pay for. You're basically just renting a computer from somebody who has access to a much faster internet connection than you (not to mention the technical know how to set up a web server and somebody on location 24/7 to fix the computer). However, beyond that is up to you for the most part on a dedicated server.. I have one that is a Linux web server and another that is running Windows and I connect to it and use it like a regular computer (basically renting a 100mbps internet connection).
     
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