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Clients Vs Customers

Discussion in 'BlackHat Lounge' started by Asif WILSON Khan, Oct 4, 2013.

  1. Asif WILSON Khan

    Asif WILSON Khan Executive VIP Premium Member

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    Is there a difference?

    If I sell a service to a client, I am working for the client and have to answer and show results to them.

    If I sell a product to a customer, I am working for myself and have to answer and show results to The Wife.

    In both those scenarios I have certain obligations and duties to perform for both the client and the customer.

    Do you see a difference or are they both the same?

    Is one scenario better than the other?



    This is another BS thread designed to gather your opinions and thoughts.
     
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  2. HelloInsomnia

    HelloInsomnia Jr. Executive VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

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    I think it depends on the wife.
     
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  3. redrubies

    redrubies Supreme Member

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    I feel there is a difference, but one of the definitions is a customer. However, I do see a difference. My clients have specific requests, and I work with them on an ongoing basis, providing them with what they are looking for. My customers may be repeat customers, but I don't see them as clients.
     
  4. sm754

    sm754 Registered Member

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    clients are like customers, but Fatter
     
  5. LakeForest

    LakeForest Supreme Member

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    HAHAHAHAHA oh my face
     
  6. igniteimages

    igniteimages Regular Member

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    I tend to see clients as more long term, perhaps project based.

    Customers are more transactional.

    Both can be bastards :)
     
  7. Goal Line Technology

    Goal Line Technology Senior Member

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    I tend to see clients as more long term, perhaps project based.

    Customers are more transactional.

    Both can be PROFITABLE, if you are doing it right!

    More here
    Code:
    http://www.wisegeek.org/what-is-the-difference-between-a-customer-and-a-client.htm
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2013
  8. lancis

    lancis Elite Member

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    Hmm, I looked for synonyms of the word "customer" and something grabbed my attention...

    Main Entry: buyer
    Part of Speech: noun
    Definition: someone who purchases
    Synonyms: client, consumer, customer, easy make, emptor, end user, patron, prospect, purchaser, representative, shopper, sucker, user, vendee
    Antonyms: marketer, seller

    Is it official now? Can I call them "dear suckers" on the landing page?
     
  9. igniteimages

    igniteimages Regular Member

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    I was just joking :)

    I've been in account management for a long time and DO develop long term profitable relationships and provide good service to clients and customers.
     
  10. banga

    banga BANNED BANNED

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    Client to me has an element of "ongoing relationship with the seller" in its meaning: if you go to the store to buy a box of matches, you're just a customer, but if you always go to that store because you know you'll get good service and good prices, you're a client. (However, the dictionary does list "customer" as one of the meanings of "client", so they are very close in meaning if not identical.)
    I would say that someone who pays a monthly fee in order to have continued access to an online service could be called a client.
     
  11. Radog

    Radog Registered Member

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    Yes, there is a difference. I consider customers to be the "people". The client to be a rich "individual". I rather sell $20 dollar product to everyone on the planet then to steal all the money from the richest person alive. I also would not want all that blood money from the presidente. Since i have no wife, i prefer customers.
     
  12. Zapdos

    Zapdos Power Member

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    A customer chooses you.
    You choose a client.

    You (usually) must serve a customer or be considered a bad seller
    You (usually) get to tell a client whether you are willing to do what they want or not.

    Customers buy from people that do quantity.
    Clients buy from people that do quality.

    Customers buy premade.
    Clients buy custom made.

    Customers treat you like shit
    Clients (should) treat you like a friend (and you them in return.)


    Customers = assholes
    Clients = usually awesome.
     
  13. WhitePassion

    WhitePassion Elite Member

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    A client is someone who keeps coming back to you, either to give you money or for advice, you're an expert in their eyes, in some field.

    A customer is usually someone who buys something and never returns. Usually amounts to a lot less money as well, but that depends of course.