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Breaking into the Offline Market

Discussion in 'Offline Marketing' started by Sylas, Jul 8, 2010.

  1. Sylas

    Sylas Junior Member

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    Occupation:
    Wholesaler
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    I have come up with a plan of sorts to make money in the offline market while I keep my online ventures ticking over. But first a little bit of background.

    Currently, I'm living in South Africa. This fact is not significant because my country is hosting the World Cup(which is awesome by the way) but rather because of the market that it provides. Due to a decade-long government-backed telecoms monopoly that has only now started to unravel, South Africa finds herself in a unique position.

    We have enough wealth to be considered by some as a first-world nation, yet we lack the advanced telecommunications industry you enjoy. We are only now starting to get high speed uncapped broadband for reasonable prices and thus we are only beginning to see the Internet become adopted by large portion of the population. As a result of this, many companies have found themselves unprepared for digital revolution and are hungry to enter the fray. Local web design outfits are popping up all over to fulfill this growing demand.

    However, most only offer their services online and orders are placed through Email of telephone. I feel that this approach is a largely faceless endeavor and lacks the human touch. Prospective clients in this environment are for the most part uneasy about websites, SEO and hosting; some are complete technophobes.

    Here's where I come in. A few days ago I Emailed the best local web design outfit I could find (their most recent project was the official page for the 2010 Fifa World Cup). A brief Email exchange lead to a phone call in which I got hold of the boss and basically told him his company needed me. I created my own position within company as a Sales Representative.

    In the beginning, I will be working on a commission basis. For each successful sale I will get about 20-25% commission as well as recurring commissions on hosting, domain registrations and SEO services I successfully sell them on top of their website. The standard package costs the equivalent of $1250. The corporate package costs around $6000. This is where it gets really big. Remember I said they did the Fifa website? Well, for government-sponsored projects like that, they can charge upwards of around $70 000 for just the website package. The boss told me that while I would only get a 20-25% commission on the standard package, that could be negotiated up to 50/50 if I managed to land one of the larger fish.

    My job will be to bridge the gap between the web design company(which is based in another city) and the clients in Cape Town. Initially I'll generate my own leads but after I've proven I can convert prospects into clients, I'll be trusted with leads the company has generated itself. I'll generate my own leads through the things I've learned here such as scraping the Yellow Pages for numbers of businesses without websites and outsourcing cold-calling. I also have a brother in the software development industry who gets many of clients asking for websites; he'd be happy to send them my way.

    Cold-calling would go something along the lines of this thread: http://www.blackhatworld.com/blackh...g-strategies-my-experience-telemarketing.html

    Once hooked, I would then meet prospects in their offices or at a coffee-shop and then sell them the idea of a website. I would print out a portfolio of all the sites the company has done and even whip out my Macbook for a live demonstration. Once sold on the idea, I would get the exact requirements of what the customer wants out of the website and relay the information to my team who would design the custom package.

    I believe wholeheartedly in what I'm selling, I believe in the South African market but most importantly I believe in myself as a salesman.

    Any input on the idea would be appreciated.
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2010
  2. jclz123

    jclz123 Regular Member

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    If you want my honest opinion mate, cut out the middle man, why do you need to be earning a commission anyway when you could be earning 100%?

    You're doing ALL of the work pretty much, you're finding the leads, chasing them up, and closing the sales.

    If I were you, I'd find some freelancers to design websites and get some cheap SEO'ers (look around theres a tonne on this forum) to promote FOR you so you're running your own business and not just selling for another.. You could easily quadruple what your earnings doing this.
     
  3. Sylas

    Sylas Junior Member

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    Occupation:
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    Thanks for the reply mate. It got me thinking and I have decided that cutting out the middle man will be my long-term goal.

    However, there are two main reasons for me sticking with them in the short-term:

    1) They are well established in that they have a presence in the local market and they have an impressive portfolio of past work. How many companies can say they did the official website for Fifa 2010? :p Prospects will be far more willing to listen if I have the clout of a big company behind me.

    2) This is my first real offline sales venture. I want to test the waters first and put my theory about the South African market to the test; perhaps get a little experience before jumping in and creating my own brand and securing workers.

    You do have a really good point though.