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1,286 People Arrested For FB and Twitter Comments

Discussion in 'BlackHat Lounge' started by The Scarlet Pimp, Nov 16, 2012.

  1. The Scarlet Pimp

    The Scarlet Pimp Jr. VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

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    since a lot of you guys use fb and twitter, you might want to keep this cautionary tale in mind.
    currently it's primarily the uk and germany but how soon before arrests like these become a world-wide problem...


    Arrest Rates Rising For Offensive Speech on Facebook

    The number of arrests made in the United Kingdom over offensive online comments are rising rapidly. According to the Associated Press, there were 873 convictions for inflammatory online comments in 2009, and 1,286 in 2011.

    That is a massive jump in just two years, illustrating the exploding popularity of social
    media sites like Facebook -- and their ability to give people a platform to say things they
    probably shouldn't.

    "Fifty years ago someone would have made a really offensive comment in a public space and it would have been heard by relatively few people," said Mike Harris of free-speech group Index on Censorship.

    "Now someone posts a picture of a burning poppy on Facebook and potentially hundreds of thousands of people can see it. People take it upon themselves to report this offensive material to police, and suddenly you've got the criminalization of offensive speech."

    The "burning poppy" in question refers to a recent case of a 19-year-old arrested for posting pictures on Facebook of him burning a poppy, a flower signifying Remembrance Day in the United Kingdom.

    The case drew outrage around the UK over freedom of expression, and the perceived over-eagerness of British authorities to persecute online users.

    Users must be careful what they post on social media sites regardless of if they fear retribution from the law or not. Things have a tendency of lasting on the Internet, so be careful what you post.

    Especially in the UK.

    ---

    LONDON -- One teenager made offensive comments about a murdered child on Twitter. Another young man wrote on Facebook that British soldiers should "go to hell." A third posted a picture of a burning paper poppy, symbol of remembrance of war dead.

    All were arrested, two convicted, and one jailed -- and they're not the only ones.

    In Britain, hundreds of people are prosecuted each year for posts, tweets, texts and emails
    deemed menacing, indecent, offensive or obscene, and the number is growing as our online lives expand.

    Lawyers say the mounting tally shows the problems of a legal system trying to regulate 21st century communications with 20th century laws. Civil libertarians say it is a threat to free speech in an age when the Internet gives everyone the power to be heard around the world.

    Figures obtained by The Associated Press through a freedom of information request show a steadily rising tally of prosecutions in Britain for electronic communications -- phone calls, emails and social media posts -- that are "grossly offensive or of an indecent, obscene or menacing character -- from 1,263 in 2009 to 1,843 in 2011.

    The number of convictions grew from 873 in 2009 to 1,286 last year.

    Behind the figures are people -- mostly young, many teenagers -- who find that a glib online remark can have life-altering consequences.

    No one knows this better than Paul Chambers, who in January 2010, worried that snow would stop him catching a flight to visit his girlfriend, tweeted:

    "Crap! Robin Hood airport is closed. You've got a week and a bit to get your (expletive) together otherwise I'm blowing the airport sky high."

    A week later, anti-terrorist police showed up at the office where he worked as a financial
    supervisor.

    Chambers was arrested, questioned for eight hours, charged, tried, convicted and fined. He lost his job, amassed thousands of pounds in legal costs and was, he says, "essentially unemployable" because of his criminal record.

    But Chambers, now 28, was lucky. His case garnered attention online, generating its own hashtag -- #twitterjoketrial -- and bringing high-profile Twitter users, including actor and comedian Stephen Fry, to his defense.

    In July, two and half years after Chambers' arrest, the High Court overturned his conviction.
    Justice Igor Judge said in his judgment that the law should not prevent "satirical or
    iconoclastic or rude comment, the expression of unpopular or unfashionable opinion about serious or trivial matters, banter or humor, even if distasteful to some or painful to those subjected to it."

    But the cases are coming thick and fast. Last month, 19-year-old Matthew Woods was sentenced to 12 weeks in jail for making offensive tweets about a missing 5-year-old girl, April Jones.

    The same month Azhar Ahmed, 20, was sentenced to 240 hours of community service for writing on Facebook that soldiers "should die and go to hell" after six British troops were killed in Afghanistan.

    Ahmed quickly deleted the post, which he said was written in anger, but was convicted anyway.

    On Sunday -- Remembrance Day -- a 19-year-old man was arrested in southern England after police received a complaint about a photo on Facebook showing the burning of a paper poppy.

    He was held for 24 hours before being released on bail and could face charges.

    For civil libertarians, this was the most painfully ironic arrest of all. Poppies are
    traditionally worn to commemorate the sacrifice of those who died for Britain and its freedoms.

    "What was the point of winning either World War if, in 2012, someone can be casually arrested by Kent Police for burning a poppy?" tweeted David Allen Green, a lawyer with London firm Preiskel who worked on the Paul Chambers case.

    Critics of the existing laws say they are both inadequate and inconsistent.

    Many of the charges come under a section of the 2003 Electronic Communications Act, an update of a 1930s statute intended to protect telephone operators from harassment. The law was drafted before Facebook and Twitter were born, and some lawyers say is not suited to policing social media, where users often have little control over who reads their words.

    It and related laws were intended to deal with hate mail or menacing phone calls to individuals, but they are being used to prosecute in cases where there seems to be no individual victim -- and often no direct threat.

    And the Internet is so vast that policing it -- even if desirable -- is a hit-and-miss affair.

    For every offensive remark that draws attention, hundreds are ignored. Conversely, comments that people thought were made only to their Facebook friends or Twitter followers can flash around the world.

    While the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that First Amendment protections of freedom of speech apply to the Internet, restrictions on online expression in other Western democracies vary widely.

    In Germany, where it is an offense to deny the Holocaust, a neo-Nazi group has had its Twitter account blocked. Twitter has said it also could agree to block content in other countries at the request of their authorities.

    There's no doubt many people in Britain have genuinely felt offended or even threatened by
    online messages. The Sun tabloid has launched a campaign calling for tougher penalties for
    online "trolls" who bully people on the Web.

    But others in a country with a cherished image as a bastion of free speech are sensitive to signs of a clampdown.

    In September Britain's chief prosecutor, Keir Starmer, announced plans to draw up new guidelines for social media prosecutions. Starmer said he recognized that too many prosecutions "will have a chilling effect on free speech."

    "I think the threshold for prosecution has to be high," he told the BBC.

    Starmer is due to publish the new guidelines in the next few weeks. But Chambers -- reluctant poster boy of online free speech -- is worried nothing will change.

    "For a couple of weeks after the appeal, we got word of judges actually quoting the case in
    similar instances and the charges being dropped," said Chambers, who today works for his
    brother's warehouse company.

    "We thought, 'Fantastic! That's exactly what we fought for.' But since then we've had cases in the opposite direction. So I don't know if lessons have been learned, really."

    ---

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/huff-wires/20121115/eu-britain-freedom-to-tweet/


    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/u...ned-by-civil-liberties-activists-8306784.html
     
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    Last edited: Nov 16, 2012
  2. Eagle Eye

    Eagle Eye Senior Member

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    thats messed up bro
     
  3. Roparadise

    Roparadise BANNED BANNED

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    That finance guy should become a corporate raider and have the last laugh,there's tons of UK companies that can be re registered in Bulgaria to both make money and f*ck over the UK,as well as firing the UK workers and hiring people in Eastern Europe.
     
  4. matei

    matei Junior Member

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    A good way to get rid of the Internet gangsters...
    If they are so tough in real life, then why don't they prove it to their 600 lbs cell mate Tyrone:D?
     
  5. Hapshepsut

    Hapshepsut Newbie

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    Arrested? Sometimes I think they leak fake stories to try and scare people...Nobody will stop me from speaking my mind not even jail
     
  6. Roparadise

    Roparadise BANNED BANNED

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    Twitter should have banned the accounts of the German government officials for trying to tell them how to run their company.
     
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  7. ja1myn

    ja1myn Senior Member

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    Fuck the police.
     
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  8. ShadeDream

    ShadeDream Elite Member

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    This is what happens when power gets in the wrong hands...
     
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  9. ja1myn

    ja1myn Senior Member

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    Precisely. When too much power is allocated into the wrong areas.
     
  10. SmileAtmyWins

    SmileAtmyWins BANNED BANNED

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    fc4.jpg
     
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  11. hekasis

    hekasis Junior Member

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    Power will always be in the wrong hands, it all depends on which side you are on.
     
  12. weedface18

    weedface18 Registered Member

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    it's crazy that you can get arrested for speaking your thoughts without actually physically hurting anyone.

    revolutions were fought for shit like this (and taxes)
     
  13. Longover

    Longover Power Member

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    I honestly think that the Internet is the last place for truly free speech. Every year, we lose more and more rights to move and speak freely on the Internet. It's the nature of government to create regulation and laws to take control from people. The Internet we know today will someday be a thing of the past.
     
  14. guptainfosys

    guptainfosys Jr. VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

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    Cheers
     
  15. The Scarlet Pimp

    The Scarlet Pimp Jr. VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

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    "freedom dies in little pieces"
     
  16. mickyfu

    mickyfu Jr. VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

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    And as the police are busy on naughty word games, someone is beating the fk out of you granny but the police cannot do anything.
     
  17. Checkmate

    Checkmate Elite Member

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    What if your bot scraped an "Offensive Speech" comment and your bot reposted/tweeted it. :eek2:
     
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  18. fuzzy_corleone

    fuzzy_corleone Regular Member

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    The world wide web is the last frontier for free speech. Eventually members of various world governments will be successful in censoring it. Where will we go?
     
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  19. moneymaker0513

    moneymaker0513 Junior Member

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    Think before you click!
     
  20. SocialMediaManager

    SocialMediaManager Elite Member

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    "They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."

    LS12_TheyThatCanGiveUpEssentialLibertyToObtainALittleTemporarySafetyDeserveNeitherLibertyOrSafet.jpg
     
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