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Where to start learning Linux? Suggest me some resources

Discussion in 'BlackHat Lounge' started by bk071, Oct 3, 2012.

  1. bk071

    bk071 Jr. Executive VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

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    I want to start learning Linux and have no clue what I should start with.

    Can you please recommend me some resources to start with? Ebook(s) preferably.

    Note : I'm an absolute beginner... just thought I'd say that before someone recommends be some intermediate stuff that I'm not familiar with :)

    Thanks.
     
  2. BlueTurtle

    BlueTurtle BANNED BANNED

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    I'd go and get yourself a basic VPS from Linode - http://www.linode.com/

    They're absolutely fantastic. The company is run by proper geeks and they provide a SUPER easy to use interface where you control everything via a web interface so you can remotely reboot, scrub your install and start over, deploy a new distribution, monitor resources etc. Basically you can mess about and do what you like without worrying about having to fix it.

    To access your server you'll ssh in with Putty. I recommend getting yourself a free(4 tab limit) copy of wintabber: http://www.wintabber.com/ so you can have 4 putty's open in 1 window and rename tabs to different things.

    You'll obviously have no GUI, but if you want to learn Linux a GUI isn't a main concern. A GUI is only necessary when you're using Linux as your desktop machine. You dual boot Linux on your home machine later on, but you'll have more fun playing about with Linode. Really what you want to do is practice setting up various servers. Here's a list of things to try which will help you learn and be of real value.

    Setup:-

    nginx as a basic web server to serve .html pages
    php-fastcgi with nginx to serve .php scripts
    (http://library.linode.com/web-servers/nginx)

    For a text editor you can start with nano

    If you're using debian/ubuntu run

    apt-get install nano

    If you're using centos/redhat run

    yum install nano

    Then nano foo.txt and the rest is self explanatory.

    If you're more adventurous go for emacs

    apt-get install emacs
    or
    yum install emacs

    In emacs to save you do ctrl-x s (hold ctrl, press x, release, press s)
    to quit ctrl-x ctrl-c (ie, hold ctrl, press x, release, hold ctrl press c)


    Install and configure mysql
    http://library.linode.com/databases/mysql


    Install and configure phpmyadmin
    (http://library.linode.com/databases/mysql/phpmyadmin-debian-5-lenny)


    That should keep you going with things to do just now. If you get stuck you're welcome to send me a pm. If you get really stuck I'll log in for you, fix it and tell you what I did. :)

    Their support is also second to none if you do need it.

    They've also got a load of excellent guides here: http://library.linode.com/

    You can start off with:

    Linode Beginner's Guide
    http://library.linode.com/beginners-guide

    Disk images & Config Profiles - This is basically for deploying your new distribution(s), assigning disk space etc
    http://library.linode.com/disk-images-config-profiles

    Linux SysAdmin Basics
    http://library.linode.com/using-linux/administration-basics


    That's the first 3 you can read. Beyond that you can pop on their IRC server for help.

    http://www.linode.com/irc/



    Their library is enough to get you started. When you've digested all that you could ask them on irc to recommend a good book to you.


    Also, they're fantastic for your production servers. *super* fast and reliable. You can pick a location from around the world too.

    The only time I wouldn't use them is if you're doing stuff that's too blackhat. They won't like that. Ie, sites that you're heavily spamming etc.

    They're my top choice for authority sites/important stuff though because of their reliability and support. Their VPS's are also super fast unlike a lot of the congested VPS's you'll find elsewhere. You'll get the CPU when you need it basically.
     
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    Last edited: Oct 3, 2012
  3. bk071

    bk071 Jr. Executive VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

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    Thanks for the reply, BlueTurtle.

    But I'd rather like to have an ebook and running the thing in a VM if thats even possible. I just don't like the concept of having a special VPS just to learn something new.

    Sure they have a backend interface you can use to restart / re-install the VM but thats not what I'm looking for. I want to look at things right as they happen.
    I prefer having the resources locally i.e on my laptop/desktop.

    And about hosting, I think I have a fair amount of servers (both WH and BH) to host my sites and run my tools on :) Self dependent, for that matter :p
     
  4. BlueTurtle

    BlueTurtle BANNED BANNED

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    You can examine absolutely everything on a VPS. There's effectively no difference between the VPS and running it inside a virtual machine. Linode actively encourage people to learn Linux with their VPS's and that's why they have their library + interface + irc support. It's the perfect learn linux environment.

    Ebook wise your best bet is to just get a torrent of any ubuntu book and install ubuntu. Any beginner's ubuntu book will do the job.
     
  5. BlueTurtle

    BlueTurtle BANNED BANNED

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    This looks decent and it's free on their site :

    http://www.makeuseof.com/pages/ubuntu-an-absolute-beginners-guide
     
  6. Zapdos

    Zapdos Power Member

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    I'd actually suggest learning CentOS commands. Many VPS providers I see now use CentOS as the default VPS OS. It's also practically a copy of RHEL (Red Hat Enterpise Linux)
     
  7. BlueTurtle

    BlueTurtle BANNED BANNED

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    I prefer CentOS for my production servers because I find everything always installs very smoothly. I've had more upgrade/dependency type issues with debian/ubuntu. I like a stress-free life. :)

    For learning, Ubuntu is better since there's far more in the way of books/tutorials/resources/help available for it and the installation if you're installing it at home is pretty much as easy as windows now.