1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

What's the best way to reach a "Tim Ferris" lots of traveling life style?

Discussion in 'BlackHat Lounge' started by Nauthiz666, Aug 21, 2012.

  1. Nauthiz666

    Nauthiz666 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2008
    Messages:
    851
    Likes Received:
    80
    I do SEO for a large company and also have my own small SEO firm I hope to grow quite a bit over the next year. But really, my goal is to be able to have income flexibility ideally around 7-10k a month that is some what residual. I really want to travel / be able to work from anywhere. But I am not 100% sure that is possible owning a SEO firm due to some picky clients etc. Anyone know what the best route of achieving this life style is? I've been thinking about everything from PPC, supplements product creation, high traffic branded sites such as blogs etc. Anyone live this sort of life style already? (note im not talking about the bullshit set it and forget it money methods... I am pretty experienced in SEO and I know that shit isnt real).

    Things I know I don't want to attempt:
    MNS sites are useless and have no longevity (dont want to manage 2000 websites)
    poor longevity cpa campaigns etc
    anything that requires tons of customer service
    anything that requires I be in a certain place or location etc
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2012
  2. Lalalaenhund

    Lalalaenhund Power Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2010
    Messages:
    738
    Likes Received:
    418
    Location:
    errywhere
    Simple, do seo for your own sites instead of clients. You can do it from anywhere in the world, you just need a laptop.
     
  3. Nauthiz666

    Nauthiz666 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2008
    Messages:
    851
    Likes Received:
    80
    Yeah I would just perfer maybe PPC > product. But SEO would be awesome too, but SEO is a rough industry these days to maintain steady income from rankings. I have 2 years to achieve this goal, so theres enough time to SEO stuff like that, but I am open to ideas.
     
  4. JimmyWong

    JimmyWong Registered Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2012
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    165
    Web designer.

    Forget about making $100k/year+, but you could probably make enough to be constantly on the move, provided you worked from a laptop.
     
  5. Nauthiz666

    Nauthiz666 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2008
    Messages:
    851
    Likes Received:
    80
    Hate web design personally lol. But good suggestion none the less.
     
  6. JimmyWong

    JimmyWong Registered Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2012
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    165
    Nevertheless after you've finished a good few sites, and are charging people a monthly fee for hosting...

    25 clients paying you $50/month for doing nothing = win.

    Sure, you'd have earned your money (no doubt clients can redefine douchefaggotry at times), but once the hard graft is over you have a fair living for a traveller.
     
  7. bryanon

    bryanon Executive VIP Premium Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2009
    Messages:
    1,395
    Likes Received:
    1,479
    Whatever you do (be it running an SEO firm, building and managing sites, selling products), the key to a lifestyle like this is having an office with a full time manager that you know and trust.

    Forget about using freelancers and outsourcing stuff to people who work from home - I've been there and done that - 9 times out of 10 you will end up wasting more time managing the freelancers and making sure that your work-from-home staff aren't slacking than you would doing all of their tasks yourself. And even though you can travel and work from anywhere, what's the point if you need to be in front of your laptop / on the phone 14 hours a day?

    So as I said - whatever your business, set a goal to establish an office and hire someone who would be capable of taking care of the office (and your business). You can then become the owner of the business, rather than the manager of the business.

    All of this is easier said than done, obviously. My business partner and I, for instance, have two offices in two different countries and 12 full-time staff, but I'm still the CEO of the business and work 8+ hours a day. You have to make sure that all processes are fully defined, that you have a capable and trustworthy manager and be absolutely confident in the sustainability of your business before you can retire or party retire (become "an owner" as opposed to "the manager").

    P.S. While I love Tim Ferris' books the real life is a little bit more complicated than how he tends to show it. (All in all he's just a marketer and his main goal is selling as many books as possible - in this sense I completely understand him). It's important to take things step by step and think everything through before committing to (possibly life-changing) goals like this.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 2
  8. Nauthiz666

    Nauthiz666 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2008
    Messages:
    851
    Likes Received:
    80
    I agree, Tim Ferris builds it a bit unrealistically. But basically I just want to make good money and be able to take a month off here and there or work from a differnet location. Working only 4 hours a week isnt necessarily my goal.
     
  9. JimmyWong

    JimmyWong Registered Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2012
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    165
    Wanting "to make good money and be able to take a month off here and there or work from a differnet location" is a completely different scenario to the question you posted.

    bryanon's analyis is spot on. Personally there's not a chance I could swan off to Thailand or Australia and be able to relax. Business is like a drug, once you gain traction it is always on your mind. Especially when you have a "physical" business.
     
  10. axus_auto

    axus_auto Power Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2011
    Messages:
    513
    Likes Received:
    502
    Consider blogging about SEO and monetizing the site. With your experience in SEO, many people would want to learn more about it.
     
  11. Autumn

    Autumn Elite Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2010
    Messages:
    2,197
    Likes Received:
    3,041
    Occupation:
    I figure out ways to make money online and then au
    Location:
    Spamville
    I live a nomadic lifestyle somewhat similar to the Tim Ferris ideal and here's how I do it:

    * 99% of my money comes from organic SEO. With PPC you have to be constantly watching your stuff like a hawk because if something goes unprofitable, you have to be able to turn if off before it burns up all your money. With organic SE traffic, if some sites tank it doesn't really matter because they don't cost very much to run. ROI is much better for organic rather than paid traffic, and this gives you some safety cushion.
    * About 50% of my traffic goes to programs that will generate recurring income, e.g. membership sites, online stores where I get a lifetime commission, gambling etc.
    * You need good money saved to ride out the rough times and unexpected catastrophes (both in IM and in life) and sound money management skills. Travelling requires a LOT of money - it is ALWAYS more expensive than you think it will be, and you cannot enjoy yourself if you don't have a reasonable amount of money.
    * You won't ever have the freedom to travel and work if you are working for someone else's company. If you are actually good at SEO then you should be running your own sites and building your own empire.
    * I am a one person show. I outsource some stuff like design on a case by case basis, but for 99% of things I rely on automation rather than employees, for the reasons that Bryanon elucidated - you can rarely rely on people, especially if you are not there to physically watch over them.
    * You will need a mailbox, VPN and call forwarding from your native country for affiliate program approvals while on the road.
    * I have invested a substantial amount of time in building my system. All of the initial work was done back home (i.e. building the framework that everything runs on). However at some point you just have to say, fuck it, I'm going to go - there is never a "perfect" time to hit the road. I am still constantly doing development every day.
    * The true 4 hour work week doesn't really exist and is just marketing hype unless you are fantastically rich. IM is just a time intensive job and even if you streamline things to the max it still takes a fair amount of time.
    * You need excellent time management and motivation skills. Travelling itself is very time intensive and tiring and you need to be able to fit in work when you can, and have the motivation to make yourself do it when it needs to be done.
    * You have to design your system so it can withstand not being able to get online temporarily, shitty 3rd world internet connections etc. If you have to be constantly checking things multiple times a day (or even every day) then you are going to be severely limited in your travelling ability. Stuff like link spamming scripts on cron jobs should be running from servers rather than local machines.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 4
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2012
  12. tacopalypse

    tacopalypse Executive VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2009
    Messages:
    980
    Likes Received:
    2,485
    Home Page:
    great answers so far.

    i like to just boil it down to a number crunching exercise :)

    start off by doing some research on your target country. decide what kind of lifestyle you want, and find out exactly how much it's going to cost you per month. your primary expenses will be things like housing, food, transportation, internet access, entertainment, utilities, etc. get an exact dollar amount for each of these and add them all up. know exactly the minimum income you need to maintain to continue your lifestyle.

    next, work your ass off until you reach double that amount. work 16 hours a day 7 days a week if you have to.

    when you reach your target income, you then start scaling down the time required to generate it. look at all of the processes you have and figure out creative ways to automate or outsource each individual part. inevitably your income will decrease a bit as a result of this which is why you need to overshoot the target to begin with.

    when you eventually get your processes working so efficiently that you're only working 4 hours a week while still making the income necessary to do the traveling you want, then you're good to go.

    here's an example:

    a lot of people in IM circles, for whatever reason, want to go live in thailand. living in thailand is pretty damn cheap, and most people can have a comfortable lifestyle there for under $2000/month, which is roughly $65/day. so just grab any cpa offer that pays out $35 per conversion. set up some kind of system to get a measly 2 conversions per day, and you can go live on a beach in the tropics. srsly.

    it's slightly oversimplified, but if you get all the numbers down, it helps a lot to show you the big picture, and that it isn't really that far out of your reach. :)
     
  13. dubious

    dubious Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2012
    Messages:
    235
    Likes Received:
    222
    Occupation:
    Project Manager/Business Development Manager
    Location:
    Australia
    I don't understand the appeal of the whole Vagabond type of lifestyle.
    I would be infinitely happier with a wife, kids, raising alpacas on farmland than travelling the world doing IM.

    To me, personal security and stability is far more valuable than a life of constant movement. Living overseas, maybe that can be an option as I am quietly watching my country decay from the inside out still blissfully deluding themselves in being an economic powerhouse whilst the two major political parties have deteriorated into equivalent incompetancy.

    Maybe travel should be something of an early retirement goal, but I cannot conceive of any reason to do it as a lifestyle choice.
     
  14. Autumn

    Autumn Elite Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2010
    Messages:
    2,197
    Likes Received:
    3,041
    Occupation:
    I figure out ways to make money online and then au
    Location:
    Spamville
    * Some people actually enjoy seeing completely different things and experiencing completely different ways of life. I thought this was bullshit before I started travelling, but travelling does indeed give you a new outlook and new perspectives on life that you just can't get if you don't do it. If you don't ever travel then you are trapped within the confines of the limited perspective of your upbringing but you don't know it.
    * You meet tons of interesting people on the road, both the locals and other travellers. Travellers are an extremely interesting and diverse bunch and you just don't get to meet those types of people if you stay where you are and socialize with people from the same area and background all the time.
    * Travelling is great for your social skills because it forces you to come out of your shell and meet new people.
    * You will get laid a lot.
    * Personally I enjoy learning new languages and it gives you a huge rush being able to communicate with people in a language that isn't your native one. Learning new languages is also extremely good for your brain.
    * Before I went abroad, I always thought that my native New Zealand was boring and didn't really like it. Now I really appreciate it for the safe, clean, orderly, beautiful and generally wonderful place it is.
    * In my opinion travel is something best enjoyed while you are young, while you still have the energy to enjoy it and before commitments of family tie you down.
    * There's a difference between being a vagabond and a nomad. Just because you are a traveller that doesn't mean you have to live like an unwashed hippie, especially if you are making a healthy living from the interwebs.
    * There can be significant tax advantages in living overseas (not so relevant to Americans).

    You might enjoy family life on the farm, but to me that sounds deadly boring... Different strokes for different folks.