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What were the specs on your first computer?

Discussion in 'BlackHat Lounge' started by clopper, Dec 6, 2007.

  1. clopper

    clopper Regular Member

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    For me it was a 33mhz intel with 8mb of ram and a 540meg hard drive.

    Now my palm pilot outperforms that, go figure. I'm sure we have some dual floppy guys in here.
     
  2. JinxY

    JinxY Regular Member

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    my first was a clone of Sinclair ZX Spectrum, running Basic Spectrum and was hooked to a Black & White TV.
     
  3. Diabolik

    Diabolik Newbie

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    I remember seeing the old clunker for the first time, I had a bunch of friends with me and suddenly we broke into song...it went like this -

    Why this computer is automatic
    It's systematic
    It's hydromatic
    Why it's grease lightning (Grease lightning)

    We'll get some overhead lifters and some four barrel quads
    oh yeah
    (Keep talking whoa keep talking)
    A fuel injection cutoff and chrome plated rods oh yeah
    (I'll get the money I'll kill to get the money)
    With a four speed on the floor they'll be waiting at the door
    You know that ain't no shit we'll be getting lots of tit
    In Grease Lightning
    Go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go

    Go grease lightning you're burning up the quarter mile
    (Grease lightning go grease lightning)
    Go grease lightning you're coasting through the heat lap trial
    You are supreme the chicks'll cream for grease lightning
    Go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go, go

    Purple french tail lights and thirty inch fins
    oh yeah
    A Palomino dashboard and duel muffler twins
    oh yeah
    With new pistons, plugs, and shocks I can get off my rocks
    You know that I ain't bragging she's a real pussy wagon
    Grease lightning

    Go grease lightning you're burning up the quarter mile
    (Grease lightning go grease lightning)
    Go grease lighting you're coasting through the heat lap trial
    You are supreme the chicks'll cream for grease lightning
    Go grease lightning you're burning up the quarter mile
    (Grease lightning go grease lightning)
    Go grease lighting you're coasting through the hit lap trial
    You are supreme the chicks'll cream for grease lightning
    Lightning, lightning, lightning
    Lightning, lightning, lightning
    Lightning

    ...Something like that
     
  4. Ruck

    Ruck Guest

    Ah jesus, that's hilarious.

    My first one was a shitty HP Pavilion for like $290. Anyone ever make $1500
    consistently a month with something like this?
     
  5. cpaaddict

    cpaaddict Supreme Member

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    my very first comp was a commodore vic 20. then spectrum 48k, 128k haha

    still got the spectrums aswell to this day
     
  6. Michel

    Michel BANNED BANNED

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    Mine was the Commodore 64 at $1,000

    My brother and I wanted a dog, so we made a script that said "we want a dog" in different colors and kept it running all day long on the tv.

    Finally my dad bought us a dog.
    My first succes with a computer lol.

    Michel
     
  7. Michel

    Michel BANNED BANNED

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    BTW, I still have it and it is great, and yes the good old floppy is also still there.
    It is the granddaddy off ALL gameconsols.

    Michel
     
  8. gts6

    gts6 Executive VIP

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    i had the ti-99/4a from texas instruments in the early 80s and the timex sinclair 1000. forget which i had first though, i think it was the ti-99/4a. having to load and run a program by connecting a standard cassette deck into the computer and hitting the "play" button and letting the tape play the bits into the computer takes a while.
     
  9. Olly

    Olly Junior Member

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    Some HP Pavilion, 3GB HD, 32 or 64mb RAM (can't remember). No idea what the processor was though. It was £1500 though :eek: That was in 1998.
     
  10. soulchief

    soulchief Junior Member

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    i think mine was
    100MHZ (upgraded to 200mhz after a year :p the lcd screen only went up to 199mhz)
    12 or 8GB HD
    64mb RAM
     
  11. MaestroDelWeb

    MaestroDelWeb Executive VIP

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    My first computer was also a Commodore 64. QuantumLink was my ISP and charged $20-30 per month plus you were also charged by the minute for chat and other Plus services. After a few monthly $300+ bills I got the internet cut off. The computer cost about $1000. I had an 800 baud modem (slow as fuck compared to 56K). Every accessory weighed a million pounds, connecting everything together was a pain in the ass and I don't even think it had a hard drive, everything was run off the floppy which was 5 1/4" in those days and actually floppy.
     
  12. sinewave

    sinewave Senior Member Premium Member

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    A cute little macintosh with 2 128k floppy drives and 128k RAM back in 1988. The OS & some apps ran off of one floppy and some other apps and docs ran off of the second one. I think it cost me just under USD$5K. I bought a 50M external SCSI Lotus HD when it came out ... thought I'd never need to dump anything ever again. Later they upgraded floppy drives and disks to 1.2M. We were in heaven.

    My next machine was a Mac FX in 1990. With the external monitor and some extra RAM the system cost me just under USD$6K. I think it came with a 100M internal drive with an extra drive bay, but I can't remember the size of the second HD that I installed. Since that rig had 6 expansion slots I used it for a good 3 years before upgrading again, as I recall. It was very easy to just pop the hood on it and easily add or remove components.

    Since I was a music producer/engineer at the time, I used the highly-expandable Mac FX series for years with Digidesign SoundTools components, Adobe Premiere, then later ProTools. Until around '99 or so, when internal processing power finally caught up to the demands of media production, these expansion systems would usually cost around and extra 30K or so. I know this because one of my studios got vandalized and that's what my insurance paid to replace just one rig. But that's what it took to produce broadcast quality media under tight deadlines.

    Ah, memories ...
    Sine
     
  13. clopper

    clopper Regular Member

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    SCSI, Scuzzy, there is a term not thrown around too often now.
     
  14. sinewave

    sinewave Senior Member Premium Member

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    The thing about the Commodores for me were the monitors. I never owned one of the computers myself, but I took my uncle's off his hands just so that I could use the monitor as a near-field video display for production on my desktop, since the other computer CRT's were of such lower resolution and "pixel shape". The CRT's manufactured for computers used round pixels, whereas televisions and that Commodore monitor used square pixels ... not to mention much faster rasterization.

    Both the Commodore monitor and other video monitors were connected to broadcast quality video outputs, and the Commodore performed as well as--if not better than--any newer video display I tried. I used it up until 2000 for near-field monitoring. And I stopped using it because I retired from sound-for-video production work:)

    I don't know anything about the Commodore series of computers, but that monitor was best-in-class for many years beyond the life of the brand itself.

    Best,
    Sine
     
  15. MaestroDelWeb

    MaestroDelWeb Executive VIP

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    SCSI hard drives are still used a lot. They are faster than regular IDE drives and more reliable. It's more popular with webhosts.
     
  16. sinewave

    sinewave Senior Member Premium Member

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    Well, I mentioned it was 1988 for a reason. You also don't hear much about 128k either, unless it's about data packets or dialup transfer rates.

    Since PC's became SCSI compatible only in the late 90's--almost 15 years after the protocol had been introduced for other platforms--it's not really THAT long in the scheme of things. But for a scant few years SCSI was a very late improvement over those lame PC parallel port pieces of shit ... prior to fire wire and full USB integration.

    But, I guess you gotta admit, we have it pretty good these days:)

    Best,
    Sine
     
  17. sinewave

    sinewave Senior Member Premium Member

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    Ah thanks vze2yqtm, I didn't realize that. Good to know. I never bothered to use an IDE drive myself, since they were so slow and not compatible with my network.

    BTW, how do you pronounce your name?

    Best,
    Sine
     
  18. ty180sx

    ty180sx Jr. VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

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    My first computer was a 286 machine ( cant remember the brand start with L )
    and it has a TURBO button! lol
    14 kbps modem and a cga monitor,
    no harddisk, no OS, 2 floppy drives, so i just play with dos games, and start the machine with MS Dos Diskette.

    it cost about 2grand at that time
     
  19. randy69

    randy69 Registered Member

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    The first computer used was in 1976. We wrote the programs in Fortran, transfered them to punched cards, & had to punch in each hole ourselves.
    The computer, (I don't remember what type), took up 2 huge rooms. One for input, the other for output.

    We'd load our cards into a hopper, and come back 2 days later to get our printout, and our cards back from the output hopper.

    If the program didn't work, or we had a punched hole in the wrong place, we'd have to repeat the whole exercise. If we were lucky, it would only be one card that we'd change. Fun times, Lol......

    My first PC. - I met this guy in the supermarket. I'd never even seen him in my life before. We got talking, and he said, Oh, I've got a spare computer at home, and you can borrow it for as long as you like. We of course became great friends. It was a Sinclair ZX Spectrum with 2 - 4 k Ram. Each key had 3 different modes, or functions.

    I was hooked, I later started my own Computer retail business, selling computers, and installing software packages.

    In 1985, I started one of the first Computer Rental businesses in Australia, called Microhire Computers, we rented out Apples. It was quite successful. I no longer work in that industry, but retrained as a librarian, (more peaceful).Lol......
     
  20. Uptownbulker

    Uptownbulker BANNED BANNED

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    OK, I am The Old Guy.

    (Please insert jokes, guffaws, hee-haws and rotting lettuce here.)

    When I first became acquainted with computers in the late eighties, everyone was playing games on them and I was in the bar business so I viewed game machines as something that you took money out of and figured that I already had enough of those! LOL!

    Later, while a very late senior at my old Alma Mater in 1995, there was actually a debate as to whether or not students should be required to own a computer.

    Well, along came THE BIG AUCTION SITE and I figured that I should get on so I went out and sold a perfectly good 1940 Buick and bought a box.

    I do have a very strong background (FCC 1st Class with Radar and Broadcast Endorsements) in electronics going back to vacuum tube technology so I wuzn't skeered.

    I grossed over 60K my first year on that site so I figgered that there might be something to those computer things.

    LOL!

    By the time that the processor blew up in this box, I had added an larger hard drive, maxed it to 512 and had all sorts of whistles, bells and buzzers on it.

    I saved the empty case after I parted it out and am going to install something nifty inside.

    I now have four boxes running at all times, have made a good living mailing and offering other internet services but have always relied on a tekkie to help me out but now my tekkie has gone off to college again so I am on my own!

    Hence the Blackhat SEO thing!

    WOO HOO!

    My first box:

    Compaq 7598:

    Technical specifications
    Supported Flavours
    UK, IT, SP, DK, NO, SW, AE, SZ, NL
    Partnumber Series 173954-xx32
    Board, Form Factor Classic Microtower
    Processor Type: INTEL P3- 600
    Memory (SDRAM) 64 MB
    Hard Drive Capacity (GB) 13 G
    Optical drives DVD
    Processor (CPU)
    Implementation Socket 370
    Clocking Options 500/533/550/600
    System Bus Speed 66/100/133 MHz
    Upgradable Processor Yes
    Processor Upgrade Options Intel Celeron and Intel Pentium III
    Chipset i810e
    Cache
    Internal L1 Primary Cache 32KB
    L2 Cache 256KB Integrated
    L3 Cache N/A
    Memory
    Memory Max* 512 MB*
    Max DIMM Capacity 256 MB
    Ram Type*** 100 MHz SDRAM, 168 pins
    Memory - In Slots 64
    Memory - Max No Discard 320
    Memory - Max with Discard 512 MB*
    Total Memory Slots, used, free 2, 1, 1
    Hard Disk (minimum common specs)
    Hard Disk Size 13
    RPM 5400
    Access Time 10.5 ms avg
    Maximum Host Transfer Rate 33.0 Mb/s
    UltraDMA (Ultra33) Enabled Yes
    Optical Drive
    CD-ROM, DVD-ROM
    Optical Device Type 8x DVD
    Optical Device Transfer Rate DVD:4455 KB/s to 10800 KB/s
    Interface ATAPI
    CD-RW
    Device Recording Speed -
    Device ReWrite Speed -
    Device CD Read Speed -
    Interface -
    Multimedia Specs
    Multimedia Feature Soft MPEG2
    DVD Player/Navigator Compaq DVD Player/Navigator
    Graphics Subsystem
    Graphics Type Accelerated 3D/2D, 2X AGP
    Graphics Mfg Name Intel i810e
    Graphics Data Width 64-Bit
    Graphics Bus Integrated
    Video Memory Amount 8 MB Shared Dynamic
    Video Memory Upgrades No
    Refresh Rate 85 Hz
    Default Resolution Standard Video Memory 800 x 600
    Default Colors Standard Video Memory 16-Bit
    Max Resolution 1600 x 1200
    Max Colors at Max Resolution 24 Bit
    Supported Compaq VGA Monitors MV520, MV720, MV920, Analog FP
    Expansion
    Slots
    Number of PCI Slots: Total/Available Four/Three (or less with options)
    Number of ISA Slots: Total/Available none
    Number of PCI/ISA Combo Slots: Total/Available none
    Drive Bays
    3.5 inch Total/Available Three/One
    5.25 inch Total/Available Two/One
    3.5 inch External/Available Two/One
    5.25 inch External/Available Two/One
    Audio
    Audio Chipset ESS Allegro with Integrated hi-fi AC'97 codec
    Audio Data Width 16-Bit
    DirectSound Support Multi-stream DirectSound and DirectSound 3D acceleration
    3D Sound support HRTF 3-D positional audio
    Sensaura CRL Positional 3D
    Dolby Digital Surround Sound (AC3)
    JBL 3D Virtual Theater (VMAx)
    Voices 32
    Soundblaster Compatability Yes
    FM Synthesis Yes
    User Controllable Functions Vol Up/Vol Down/Mute
    External Speakers (Included with Compaq Monitor)
    RMS Power: 2.5 W at 1 percent THD
    Frequency Response: 84 - 18 kHz (+/- 10 dB)
    Efficiency: 86.5 dB at 1 W 1M
    Headphone Gain: -44 dB (12 mW/32 ohms)
    S/N Ratio: 74 dB
    Channel Separation: 54 dB (100 - 10 kHz)
    Communications, Mice, etc
    Fax Modem Installed 56K ITU V.90
    Fax Software (Windows 98) RingCentral Fax
    Pointing Device Scroll Mouse
    Keyboard Easy Access Internet
    Standard Diskette Size 3.5 inch 1.44 MB
    Front I/O Interfaces:
    Number of USB Connectors Two
    Back I/O Interfaces
    Number of USB Connectors Two
    Serial RS-232C/DB9 Connector One
    Parallel EPP/ECP /DB25 Connector One
    MIDI/GamePort One
    Number of RJ11 Phone Jacks One
    Audio Line Out, Line In, Mic In
    Mouse/Keyboard Ports One/One
    Power and Energy Management
    Sleep, instant on, Stand by mode yes, yes, yes
    ACPI, PC98, Energy Star, NTSL Y2K Yes
    Power Supply 145Watt
    Voltage Range 180-264 or 90-132
    AC Frequency (Hz) 47-63
    Fluctuations 5v +/- 5 percent, 3.3v +/- 3 percent
    Power during sleep mode less than 30 W