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What does this mean in spanish??

Discussion in 'BlackHat Lounge' started by psmtrack, Oct 9, 2009.

  1. psmtrack

    psmtrack BANNED BANNED

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    bien y tu mucho senorita?

    just got it from some chic
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2009
  2. CClark56

    CClark56 Regular Member

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    My Spanish sucks but I believe it's: I miss you a lot Senorita.
     
  3. shadowfax

    shadowfax Power Member

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    Using Google Translator I got this

    very well and your senorita?
     
  4. jh0ny90

    jh0ny90 Regular Member

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    Fine and you much seƱorita it don't make sense but that's wut it is
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  5. LadRak

    LadRak Registered Member

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    If you got it online was someone ewhoring you using a translator.

    That means "fine and you a lot lady?".
    Makes no sense, it was probably not a spanish chick telling you this, but an american troll.
     
  6. Dillusion

    Dillusion BANNED BANNED

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    That phrase is incorrect

    What he probably wanted to say is this:

    mucho bien, y tu senorita?

    which means very good and you honey/darling?

    This is the most plausible translation!
     
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  7. CClark56

    CClark56 Regular Member

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    If it were, then it would make sense to the translator, since the American troll would have used one.

    A lot of people think the Language to Language translators work, they don't and they probably never will, at least not to the extent of a human translator.

    Things get lost in translation because we have words for certain things other languages don't have, if you know what a paradox is:

    ---

    Say there's a small town, that has one barber (the barber's a man).
    The one barber shaves every man who does not shave ones self.

    So the paradox is: does the barber shave him self?

    But you must ask, if he doesn't shave him self, does he shave him self?

    ---

    Now, you may ask "why does this even matter?".
    Well, it matters a lot. See, we wouldn't have this contradiction if we had a word for shaving ones self. So if a language has a word for shaving ones self and another doesn't you're going to end up with a nonsensical statement, thus, it coming out all fucked up like displayed above.

    ------

    Someone explained it exactly on YouTube:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n0u17pmL78w
     
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    Last edited: Oct 10, 2009
  8. Silencer

    Silencer Senior Member

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    I go to Spanish class and I think it means.

    "Very good, and you, Senorita?"
     
  9. Dillusion

    Dillusion BANNED BANNED

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    My father is Spanish, my mother Portuguese, I speak both languages fluently, well, maybe a little better Portuguese because I've spent most of my time here.

    But my point is, the initial phrase posted by the OP, is critically incorrect.

    It is pretty much like saying "good, and you very darling?" it sounds as horrible in English as it sounds in Spanish.

    As I said above, what the initial writer probably wanted to say is "very good and you darling?"

    Which might get you those break down translations in some online translators.
     
  10. LadRak

    LadRak Registered Member

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    I know that. I didn't used a translator to convert the Spanish sentence to English.

    I'm a Portuguese speaker, and although there are some rare and few words that are extremely different, everything else is pretty much the same on both languages.

    That spanish sentence makes no sense. Period. No one with a minimal understanding of spanish would do such a big mistake.
     
  11. Dillusion

    Dillusion BANNED BANNED

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    Are you from Portugal?
     
  12. phpfiend

    phpfiend Junior Member

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    I agree with Dillusional. It doesn't take an online translator to get the litteral translation of that sentance. Keep in mind that any language translated via computer not a human will come out grammatically incorrect.
     
  13. LadRak

    LadRak Registered Member

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    Yes
    (message too short yabda yabda)
     
  14. edvoltage1

    edvoltage1 Regular Member

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    this is true because my native language is spanish and I can understand Portuguese 99.9% of the time.
     
  15. Dillusion

    Dillusion BANNED BANNED

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    Glad to see other Portuguese members in such a great place, I thought that in this forum it was pretty much me and xcubix.
     
  16. psmtrack

    psmtrack BANNED BANNED

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    yea i think she meant and you darling.. cuz i said como estas...

    so i guess senorita could be darlin too huh
     
  17. Dillusion

    Dillusion BANNED BANNED

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    yeah, senorita has the same intention in Spanish as darling in English