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What Are The Legal Issues In Revealings Someone's Domains and Keywords

Discussion in 'Domain Names & Parking' started by joelcommisafag, Jul 8, 2008.

  1. joelcommisafag

    joelcommisafag Newbie

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    If someone were to do a reverse ip on a site and find out that persons other niches and domain names, + get their keywords from any of the many keywords tools, would there be any legal reproductions for making this information downloadable?


    As I see it, the information is already there, freely available for anyone to get access to. Its just that most people dont know how to get it.

    It may be unethical to reveal someone else's promotional strategies or niches, but would it be illegal?

    Hopefully someone with some sort of legal background might be able to answer this one.
     
  2. tattoo

    tattoo Regular Member

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    there are a lot of blackhatters who will kick your ass if you do it, but yes, you can also be in legal troubles, because a court can find that a person's promotional strategies, niches, keywords etc constitute a trade secret. generally speaking, laws governing trade secrets are on a state by state basis so you can be sued in any state under state law for disclosing trade secrets, but in 1996 a federal law was passed. it's now covered under section 1832, so you can also face criminal charges...
     
  3. joelcommisafag

    joelcommisafag Newbie

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    good points.. i was just curious.
     
  4. nicksor

    nicksor BANNED BANNED

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    How is something that's published on the internet considered a trade secret? Unless you enter into an agreement with the third party regarding that information, how would it be enforceable? If you're really interested, just lookup some IP lawyers.. I'm sure they'll be happy to answer your questions.
     
  5. gifmore

    gifmore Regular Member

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    Errr.. but wouldn't some of the following resources allow you to find out some sort of competitive intelligence anyways:

    a. Whois records
    b. Viewing the source code of the webpages.
    c. Using spying keyword tools such as spyfu, keyword competitor and others to see what adwords keywords are being used, if at all.
    d. You can sometimes type the business owner's name and find other salesletters or squeezepages used by them and hence the domains (although many use images to sign off their names now :p)

    ....errr.... am I posting too much already....:p

    But seriously, is this any different from me going to myspace and telling my friends about a website, and add "by the way" this guy is selling his stuff using these keywords..?

    Maybe folks don't sell or make the information downloadable, but I have a feeling that such competitive intelligence is being gathered all over the net, every single day.....and I think some folks build spiders and bots just to harvest such information...wish I knew how to do that :D

    Cheerio.
     
  6. Caveman

    Caveman Newbie

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    Legal problems? Nope
    Personal problems? Quite possibly ;)
     
  7. tattoo

    tattoo Regular Member

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    yeah there's definitely a difference between using the information yourself and disseminating it.

    but the bottom line is that this is likely to be new ground and without precedents the courts will have to decide if the material in question constitutes trade secrets. unless you have the resources to go to court to settle the issue of whether that information falls under section 1832, it's best to avoid it altogether.

    the good news is that if you are found guilty you won't be fined more than five million dollars or imprisoned more than 10 years :)

    further reading (from wikipedia):
     
  8. joelcommisafag

    joelcommisafag Newbie

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    Can you provide the Wiki link to this? I'd like to read it's sources.