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Want to travel the world and make money? Here's a way

Discussion in 'BlackHat Lounge' started by GoldenGlovez, Feb 16, 2012.

  1. GoldenGlovez

    GoldenGlovez Moderator Staff Member Moderator Jr. VIP

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    This is not an online money making method, advertising scheme, or bullshit. I'm writing this from my own personal real life experience, and sharing something that has completely changed my life in a profound way. If this post inspires only one or two people, it will have done it's job.

    Before continuing, answer these questions:

    • Do you want to travel the world, and live in countries such as China, Thailand, Colombia, Argentina, Japan, Cambodia, Saudi Arabia?
    • Would you like to work only 15-20 hours a week, 8 to 9 months out of the year?
    • Are you a native English speaker? (Or can you speak/write English at a fluent level?)

    If you answered YES to the above questions then please read on.

    A little background:
    In 2008, I was having a tough time finding new work (Information Technology), bored with living in the same area I grew up in, in a broken relationship of nearly 5 years, and in the midst of a quarter life crisis. I needed a change, something new and adventurous, and I needed it fast. So I began looking for answers.

    I had remembered reading about people teaching English abroad a few years back (I was always looking into living in Japan, and trying to find a way how), so I started to search for more information. After reading through various blogs and forums, I found an offer that would allow you to acquire the necessary teaching certification (TEFL or TESOL) and a guaranteed placement teaching in China. After a week of considering this opportunity(and checking the legitimacy of the company), I made the jump and signed up. One month later, I was on a plane to Beijing and my life hasn't been the same since.

    Let me break it down for you:
    Teaching English abroad is a great way to travel and make/save money. In most countries, you will only work 15-20 hours a week between 8 and 9 months a year. You could invest all that free time into working/learning the Internet Marketing business. You could spend that free time traveling from Thailand to Burma or Malaysia or Vietnam. Or you could spend all your extra cash on booze, hookers, and blow (I'm not here to judge!).

    It's a fun and engaging job with a plethora of perks and learning opportunities. You will meet and befriend people from all around the world, from other teachers to successful businessmen (Think of the networking opportunities). Stories that will amaze your family, shock your friends, and one day be able to tell your grand children. Imagine returning to your home country (You may never want to) to look for a job and being able to put 'Worked in Cambodia for one year' on your resume.

    You could be living in an exotic country, earning $1,000-$2,000 USD/mo where the average income is less than half that. Teaching won't make you rich (not right away), but you'll certainly be living comfortable. You may even fall in love with the job and continue to do so for many years! I've got friends who have been teaching for 10+ years abroad and are bringing home bank (60k+ USD/Year). Think about what you could do when you augment that salary with your online income!

    Here's a quick perspective:
    In South-East Asia, you can rent a 3-4 bedroom villa w/ private yard by the beach for $400-600 USD/mo, eating out can cost you only $4-8 USD/day (Local food), Unlimited Internet w/ 12Mbps speeds $15-30USD/mo, and even cheaper commodities.

    "But GoldenGlovez wait...":
    Let me break some common misconceptions I've heard about traveling and teaching.
    Q: Don't you need an English degree to teach English?
    A: Not at all. In fact, many countries do not require a college degree at all.

    Q: Don't I need to speak the local language to teach English?
    A: Nope. You are discouraged from using local language in the classroom. Most schools will have a local language/English speaking teacher to supplement their education. Although, learning the local language is highly suggested if you want to make living in a country easier.

    Q: Isn't (Insert Country Name Here) dirty, unsafe, poor, etc..?
    A: Depends. The choice is yours on where you want to teach. Would you like to teach in a towering mega-city such as Shanghai or a local village deep within Inner Mongolia? I spent 6 months in Bogota, Colombia which is touted as a 'high risk' country, yet there never was there a problem and I had an amazing time. Surprisingly, life in most countries is relaxed and extremely safe (For us Americans, this can be hard to believe at first); if you have any street smarts, keep aware of your surroundings, and learn what alleyway not to walk down at 4am, you'll be just fine.

    Where to start:
    First, your going to need some form of teaching certification. While there are many different forms of accreditation, the most popular are TEFL/TESOL and CELTA/DELTA. While they are all similar, some are regarded higher than others in different countries (i.e In Asia the TEFL/TESOL is popular, while in South America many schools look for a CELTA/DELTA certification). You will have to research online which certification a country prefers; I'll include a list of resources at the end of this post. The great part about these certifications is they can be completed nearly 100% online (You'll likely have to take one or two weekend classes in a training center). You'll also receive all the training material you need to pass each test. Generally, it's about 100 hours of reading/testing to get certified, which can be easily completed in 2-4 weeks.

    Next, you'll need to search for a school in the country of your choice. Many schools have varying requirements; ranging from type of certification, length of teaching experience, your country of origin, and more. Finding your first school can be a daunting and stressful task, but trust me it gets easier! Luckily, there are a lot of resources online about how to handle finding your first teaching job, covering topics such as contract negotiation and accommodations.

    Still with me? Great!:
    Here is a list of resources that will help get you started,

    Dave's ESL Cafe: http://www.eslcafe.com/ (This IS probably the best website for all information regarding ESL, including finding jobs)
    TEFL Certification: http://www.i-to-i.com/tefl/ (There's other accredited companies, but I used these guys for mine)
    CELTA/DELTA Certification: http://www.cambridgeesol.org/exams/celta/index.html
    I'll post some more as a I remember them.

    If you're interested in learning more about traveling and/or teaching and have any questions, please post them here and I'll try my best to answer them.

    Love,
    GoldenGlovez
     
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  2. bgmaster

    bgmaster Newbie

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    I will look into this, seems like something I would like to do!
     
  3. khanna_rohit

    khanna_rohit BANNED BANNED

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    sounds good, have to it a go.
     
  4. nethead01

    nethead01 Regular Member

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    looks fun! i will keep this in mind.
     
  5. Nookie Monster

    Nookie Monster Senior Member

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    My wife did something simular after college. She did a two year stint in the Peace Corp and traveled Eastern Europe in her spare time. She visited so many places and experienced many different people and cultures.
     
  6. mikkosoporno

    mikkosoporno Registered Member

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    I build my backlinks from Bali, life is pretty sweet here.
     
  7. andre09

    andre09 Junior Member

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    This is a really inspiring thread. I've always flirted with the idea of teaching in another country (hell, seems like all the cool kids are doing it these days), but never really took the time to look up the requirements. I always though the bare minimum was a college degree (though with no particular major necessary), and because university work has become so very trying, the fact you don't need a degree makes this idea even more appealing.

    From your post I assume you have bounced around various countries. I also assume you didn't learn the local language of all those countries. As I too, would like to experience a wide range of locations, I would like to know your experiences of teaching in an area where you did not know the local language.

    Thanks!
     
  8. GoldenGlovez

    GoldenGlovez Moderator Staff Member Moderator Jr. VIP

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    Hey Andre09,

    Some countries are strict about having a diploma, others say they require but make exceptions, and some do not need one at all (China for example). I know of people who have taught in 'degree required' countries (like Japan) using a fake diploma from either a diploma mill in Thailand or using a friend's diploma and changing the name. Many private schools will not double check this information and the ones that do just move on. I've not personally done this, but there are many who do. You'll have to research your options without a degree, but it's very doable. Having a TEFL/TESOL or CELTA/DELTA is what most schools really want.

    My first teaching job was in China (Where I still live now), and I was placed through a company in a small city named Zhongshan. I spent 6 months teaching grade 8 at a local grade school (Ages 11-12). The staff mostly spoke English, so it was easy to learn the classes/times and communicate any issues. They were helpful with setting up anything I needed (but at times required twisting fingers). One of the teachers was very helpful in particular and gave me her number to contact for any issues outside the school.

    Making friends with other expats is a must! Befriend your colleagues (both local and foreign) and try to find the local foreign watering hole and start introducing yourself asap. Not only can they help you with adjusting to the new culture, but they can save your ass in situations you can't explain. It's also a great way to build your own personal network of contacts. For example: After the 6 month gig at the high school, I was offered a job to manage the local foreign bar, which I did for a year. I also had many options for better schools through people I met.

    Forgot to add an experience :p
    My first month in China, a friend lent me his motorbike to use the next day. On the way to classes the front tire goes flat. I call the school and they tell me to leave the bike and taxi there (I was due in class in 10 minutes). Not wanting to leave this mans bike on the side of a random road, I walked it to where I remember seeing a bike shop. When I get there, I point at the issue and the guy gives the nod that he understands. I asked how much in Chinese and heard him respond 40 RMB (About 7 USD), I agreed and waited. After he finished replacing the tube and air, I hand him the 40 RMB and he starts looking pissed. After trying to figure out what's going on, I called the school and handed the guy the phone.

    Turns out he wanted 400 RMB (70 USD) for the quick tire fix. I hastily disagreed. Within 10 minutes, people from my school show up, the local police show up, and a large crowd on this small side street begins to form. The local police, the lady from the school, and the bike repairman begin a loud yelling match (How all matters are handled in China). I ended up paying 150 RMB for what should have been a 40 RMB job.

    Cheers,
    GG
     
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    Last edited: Feb 16, 2012
  9. Mutikasa

    Mutikasa Power Member

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    how are the girls in those countries?
     
  10. GoldenGlovez

    GoldenGlovez Moderator Staff Member Moderator Jr. VIP

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    Could you be a little more specific? What about them would you like to know? Women are different in every country due to cultural differences, but in the end women are women and do womanly things, not much changes in that department.
     
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  11. NKRYPTYK

    NKRYPTYK BANNED BANNED

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    ^^^ This man took the words right out of my head !!! lol I mean
    I understand its for teaching but I NEEDS MY PLEASURE !!!
     
  12. t0mmy

    t0mmy Moderator Staff Member Moderator Jr. VIP

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    word to that GG, i thought the Irish women were hot stuff but god damn since i got to spain its been a constant head turning crazyness! the women in Spain are fucking hot!! lol
     
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  13. wokaka

    wokaka Senior Member

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    im sorry but that's not traveling the world and make money mate. that's just moving abroad and teach english there. of course from china you can go to SE asia etc. but people who live in (let's say) Argentina can also travel to nearby countries when they have chance to do so. This is not the same with really traveling from place to place, from continent to continent.

    i though this is about having a real-life experience travel blog. I dont remember the blog URL but i remember the blogger REALLY travel all the time, like living here for 3 months and there for 3 months and keep traveling and still be able to make real profit from his blog like $5k/month, not bad of course for a backpacker like him.
     
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  14. GoldenGlovez

    GoldenGlovez Moderator Staff Member Moderator Jr. VIP

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    Wokaka,

    Writing a travel blog is not the only way to travel and make money.

    In the last 3 years, I've been throughout Asia, Russia, South America, and North America (soon to hit Australia) while making money from private teaching and online income. Could you explain to me how that is not traveling and making money?

    Regards,
    GG
     
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  15. NikosX

    NikosX Power Member

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    come on! really?
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    In a VPS far far away...
    cool scenario:

    you go to a country in some small village and teach english or whatever language you want... you hook up the people living there with your online income things. you teach them the work. you recruit them and you have your personal im army. everyone lives happily ever after...
     
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  16. Krazy Kitty

    Krazy Kitty Regular Member

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    GoldenGloves,

    Thoroughly enjoyed your post. I'll take you up on your offer and poke around in your brain, if you don't mind.

    I have a BA in English, published works, and I've often toyed with the idea of traveling via the TEFL route. Japan would be my ideal destination.

    Is this a young person's game? My twenties are a distant memory. If I did it, I'd have a husband along for the ride, and I certainly wouldn't want to stay in shared accommodation (while they were fun, I've kissed goodbye to my days of YMCA and student-style housing!), and would, instead, look for accommodation that doesn't come part and parcel with the job. Do other TEFL teachers fund accommodation privately? At 40, would I stick out like a sore thumb?
     
  17. GoldenGlovez

    GoldenGlovez Moderator Staff Member Moderator Jr. VIP

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    Greetings Krazy_Kitty,

    I have friends who are well into their 50's and a few in their 60's teaching English abroad and have been doing so for many years. The only real benefits for younger teachers are the lack of major obligations (Mortgage, Children, Car Payments, Etc..). From what I've been told, schools absolutely adore couples who come to teach. To them this gives an increased sense of security investing into a new teacher and portrays a higher level of responsibility (Compared to a twenty something who may be there to party).

    Most schools will provide either accommodation or a stipend should you want to rent on your own. School provided accommodations can vary in quality but will usually be fairly decent. They may provide a private apartment inside a 'teachers' building on campus or nearby. It's unlikely they would suggest shared accommodations for a married couple. Keep in mind to discuss this with any potential employers and have it written in the contract.

    Since you have a BA in English, you'll certainly be a prime candidate and eligible for more prestigious schools/universities (depending on experience). You'll also likely have to pair your degree with a TEFL/TESOL certification; cheap and fairly easy to acquire.

    Hope this helps, and I would love to hear back from you should you decide to make the jump!

    Regards,
    Rob
    (GoldenGlovez)
     
  18. GoldenGlovez

    GoldenGlovez Moderator Staff Member Moderator Jr. VIP

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  19. BENNY8877

    BENNY8877 Supreme Member

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    Don't you have problems consistently being able to get online if you're teaching in small villages?
     
  20. jammie

    jammie Jr. VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

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    I did this in Japan for a while. Great way to experience the country and culture away from the tourist populated bits.

    One night i ended up playing Jenga as a drinking game, with home-made plum liquor (ume-shuu) until 3am then rocking up to a TGI fridays with everyone as they didn't shut until 5am!

    Be warned; some employers are crap and will seriously fuck you around. They're well documented online though so just do your own research!

    The job pays (surprisingly) well, and is very easy (too easy once you've done >10 lessons!). If you want an easy life and no commitments, this is by far the best way to do it.

    I know people who went "for a year" to the east to teach english ... 15 years later they still haven't come home! ... or got married, or a house, or kids ...

    Definitely worth doing though! If you don't think you could teach english ... trust me, you can. Anyone can. I hated teaching in general as i was crap, but they pay for exposure to the language, so it's not technical or difficult.
     
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