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wanna ask regarding niche content on Subdomain.

Discussion in 'Blogging' started by blueplue, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. blueplue

    blueplue Junior Member

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    Hello,

    I would like to ask If I have a website hosted on a top level domain called:
    blueplue.com

    Then I have difference niche blogged under the sub-domain name.
    Health.blueplue.com
    Adult.blueplue.com
    Jobs.blueplue.com
    recipe.blueplue.com
    seo.blueplue.com

    If I have these different subdomain hosted on the same top level domain.
    regarding the Adult niche - will it affect my google ranking on other niche since it the same domain name.
     
  2. blueplue

    blueplue Junior Member

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    disclaimer: blueplue.com is not mine!
     
  3. blueplue

    blueplue Junior Member

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    Found the answer.

    Here is a summary:


    Blog Hosting: Subdomain or Subdirectory

    But is using a subdomain for your blog the most effective hosting solution, from an SEO standpoint? For their customers who opt for the entire package (website & blog hosting), HubSpot installs the blog in a keyword-rich subdirectory — which tells me that even HubSpot believes this to be the preferable choice between subdomain and subdirectory.
    So what is the consensus among respected SEOs around this issue of subdomain v. subdirectory?
    Google's Subdomain/Primary Domain Algorithm

    In the past, Google viewed subdomains as completely separate entities from the primary domain. Because Google uses what it calls "host crowding" to return up to two results from a single domain on a search engine results page (SERP) (with the second one indented), with subdomains treated as totally separate, a single domain could get more than two listings on a Google SERP, through its subdomains. Because Google prefers to offer their users a varied selection of search results rather than multiple results from a single entity, they made a change in December 2007, announcing that subdomains would be more closely associated with the primary domain — not to the point of being viewed as a subdirectory, but not so completely separate — and Matt Cutts wrote about this on his blog.
    Although Google now more closely associates subdomains and primary domains, it still views them as separate entities. Thus, when another site links to your blog or individual posts, that "link love" flows back to the subdomain rather than to your primary domain.
    If your blog tends to have content similar to that on your main website — and content relevant to your core offering — then having your blog in subdirectory of your primary domain creates a larger website with more related content. And any external linking credits to your blog flow back to your primary domain. The content of your primary domain is associated by Google with the content of your blog. If the blog is in a subdomain, although there apparently is some association, it appears that it's not nearly as strong as having the blog content in your primary domain.


    Read more: http://www.hyperarts.com/blog/blog-hosting-external-subdomain-subdirectory-best-seo/#ixzz14egpU6kG
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2010