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"The Secret Meeting that Changed Rap Music and Destroyed a Generation"

Discussion in 'BlackHat Lounge' started by GreenGoblin, May 22, 2012.

  1. GreenGoblin

    GreenGoblin BANNED BANNED

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    Something I read today, wanted to get some opinions on the article the source of the read is here

    http://www.mymediablast.com/Word-On-The-Street/qthe-secret-meeting-that-changed-rap-music-and-destroyed-a-generationq.html#axzz1vbo16olS



    This anonymous letter landed in my inbox about a minute ago:
    Hello,

    After more than 20 years, I've finally decided to tell the world what I witnessed in 1991, which I believe was one of the biggest turning point in popular music, and ultimately American society. I have struggled for a long time weighing the pros and cons of making this story public as I was reluctant to implicate the individuals who were present that day. So I've simply decided to leave out names and all the details that may risk my personal well being and that of those who were, like me, dragged into something they weren't ready for.
    Between the late 80's and early 90's, I was what you may call a "decision maker" with one of the more established company in the music industry. I came from Europe in the early 80's and quickly established myself in the business. The industry was different back then. Since technology and media weren't accessible to people like they are today, the industry had more control over the public and had the means to influence them anyway it wanted. This may explain why in early 1991, I was invited to attend a closed door meeting with a small group of music business insiders to discuss rap music's new direction. Little did I know that we would be asked to participate in one of the most unethical and destructive business practice I've ever seen.
    The meeting was held at a private residence on the outskirts of Los Angeles. I remember about 25 to 30 people being there, most of them familiar faces. Speaking to those I knew, we joked about the theme of the meeting as many of us did not care for rap music and failed to see the purpose of being invited to a private gathering to discuss its future. Among the attendees was a small group of unfamiliar faces who stayed to themselves and made no attempt to socialize beyond their circle. Based on their behavior and formal appearances, they didn't seem to be in our industry. Our casual chatter was interrupted when we were asked to sign a confidentiality agreement preventing us from publicly discussing the information presented during the meeting. Needless to say, this intrigued and in some cases disturbed many of us. The agreement was only a page long but very clear on the matter and consequences which stated that violating the terms would result in job termination. We asked several people what this meeting was about and the reason for such secrecy but couldn't find anyone who had answers for us. A few people refused to sign and walked out. No one stopped them. I was tempted to follow but curiosity got the best of me. A man who was part of the "unfamiliar" group collected the agreements from us.
    Quickly after the meeting began, one of my industry colleagues (who shall remain nameless like everyone else) thanked us for attending. He then gave the floor to a man who only introduced himself by first name and gave no further details about his personal background. I think he was the owner of the residence but it was never confirmed. He briefly praised all of us for the success we had achieved in our industry and congratulated us for being selected as part of this small group of "decision makers". At this point I begin to feel slightly uncomfortable at the strangeness of this gathering. The subject quickly changed as the speaker went on to tell us that the respective companies we represented had invested in a very profitable industry which could become even more rewarding with our active involvement. He explained that the companies we work for had invested millions into the building of privately owned prisons and that our positions of influence in the music industry would actually impact the profitability of these investments. I remember many of us in the group immediately looking at each other in confusion. At the time, I didn't know what a private prison was but I wasn't the only one. Sure enough, someone asked what these prisons were and what any of this had to do with us. We were told that these prisons were built by privately owned companies who received funding from the government based on the number of inmates. The more inmates, the more money the government would pay these prisons. It was also made clear to us that since these prisons are privately owned, as they become publicly traded, we'd be able to buy shares. Most of us were taken back by this. Again, a couple of people asked what this had to do with us. At this point, my industry colleague who had first opened the meeting took the floor again and answered our questions. He told us that since our employers had become silent investors in this prison business, it was now in their interest to make sure that these prisons remained filled. Our job would be to help make this happen by marketing music which promotes criminal behavior, rap being the music of choice. He assured us that this would be a great situation for us because rap music was becoming an increasingly profitable market for our companies, and as employee, we'd also be able to buy personal stocks in these prisons. Immediately, silence came over the room. You could have heard a pin drop. I remember looking around to make sure I wasn't dreaming and saw half of the people with dropped jaws. My daze was interrupted when someone shouted, "Is this a f****** joke?" At this point things became chaotic. Two of the men who were part of the "unfamiliar" group grabbed the man who shouted out and attempted to remove him from the house. A few of us, myself included, tried to intervene. One of them pulled out a gun and we all backed off. They separated us from the crowd and all four of us were escorted outside. My industry colleague who had opened the meeting earlier hurried out to meet us and reminded us that we had signed agreement and would suffer the consequences of speaking about this publicly or even with those who attended the meeting. I asked him why he was involved with something this corrupt and he replied that it was bigger than the music business and nothing we'd want to challenge without risking consequences. We all protested and as he walked back into the house I remember word for word the last thing he said, "It's out of my hands now. Remember you signed an agreement." He then closed the door behind him. The men rushed us to our cars and actually watched until we drove off.
    A million things were going through my mind as I drove away and I eventually decided to pull over and park on a side street in order to collect my thoughts. I replayed everything in my mind repeatedly and it all seemed very surreal to me. I was angry with myself for not having taken a more active role in questioning what had been presented to us. I'd like to believe the shock of it all is what suspended my better nature. After what seemed like an eternity, I was able to calm myself enough to make it home. I didn't talk or call anyone that night. The next day back at the office, I was visibly out of it but blamed it on being under the weather. No one else in my department had been invited to the meeting and I felt a sense of guilt for not being able to share what I had witnessed. I thought about contacting the 3 others who wear kicked out of the house but I didn't remember their names and thought that tracking them down would probably bring unwanted attention. I considered speaking out publicly at the risk of losing my job but I realized I'd probably be jeopardizing more than my job and I wasn't willing to risk anything happening to my family. I thought about those men with guns and wondered who they were? I had been told that this was bigger than the music business and all I could do was let my imagination run free. There were no answers and no one to talk to. I tried to do a little bit of research on private prisons but didn't uncover anything about the music business' involvement. However, the information I did find confirmed how dangerous this prison business really was. Days turned into weeks and weeks into months. Eventually, it was as if the meeting had never taken place. It all seemed surreal. I became more reclusive and stopped going to any industry events unless professionally obligated to do so. On two occasions, I found myself attending the same function as my former colleague. Both times, our eyes met but nothing more was exchanged.
    As the months passed, rap music had definitely changed direction. I was never a fan of it but even I could tell the difference. Rap acts that talked about politics or harmless fun were quickly fading away as gangster rap started dominating the airwaves. Only a few months had passed since the meeting but I suspect that the ideas presented that day had been successfully implemented. It was as if the order has been given to all major label executives. The music was climbing the charts and most companies when more than happy to capitalize on it. Each one was churning out their very own gangster rap acts on an assembly line. Everyone bought into it, consumers included. Violence and drug use became a central theme in most rap music. I spoke to a few of my peers in the industry to get their opinions on the new trend but was told repeatedly that it was all about supply and demand. Sadly many of them even expressed that the music reinforced their prejudice of minorities.
    I officially quit the music business in 1993 but my heart had already left months before. I broke ties with the majority of my peers and removed myself from this thing I had once loved. I took some time off, returned to Europe for a few years, settled out of state, and lived a "quiet" life away from the world of entertainment. As the years passed, I managed to keep my secret, fearful of sharing it with the wrong person but also a little ashamed of not having had the balls to blow the whistle. But as rap got worse, my guilt grew. Fortunately, in the late 90's, having the internet as a resource which wasn't at my disposal in the early days made it easier for me to investigate what is now labeled the prison industrial complex. Now that I have a greater understanding of how private prisons operate, things make much more sense than they ever have. I see how the criminalization of rap music played a big part in promoting racial stereotypes and misguided so many impressionable young minds into adopting these glorified criminal behaviors which often lead to incarceration. Twenty years of guilt is a heavy load to carry but the least I can do now is to share my story, hoping that fans of rap music realize how they've been used for the past 2 decades. Although I plan on remaining anonymous for obvious reasons, my goal now is to get this information out to as many people as possible. Please help me spread the word. Hopefully, others who attended the meeting back in 1991 will be inspired by this and tell their own stories. Most importantly, if only one life has been touched by my story, I pray it makes the weight of my guilt a little more tolerable.
    Thank you.
     
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  2. drdankmendez

    drdankmendez Junior Member

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    Interesting read for sure.

    Having never been involved with the music industry I can't really comment on their affiliations or ethics...however spending a bit of time in the private prison industry I can confirm that prisons are some of the most profitable 'non-profits' around.

    Really the biggest thing I am reminded about from reading this is that rap used to be hip-hop and it didn't suck.
     
  3. silentthunder

    silentthunder Jr. VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

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    Well that was certainly a hypnotic read!

    I don't have a way of verifying it although it definitely addresses historical facts. Some of my Bros who are hip hop heads and I figured out gangsta was suspect on our own a few years ago. How do you go from Public Enemy and Brand Nubians to 50 Cent and Little Wayne if there isn't industry manipulation with bad intent? This letter may be a cleverly written fraud with what is to me obviously good intent. Waking people up to a predominant means of social engineering that takes "black hatting" to another level. Plenty of people immerse themselves in an un necessary lifestyle because of the music they listen to.

    Thanks for the read. Dave Chapelle knows what time it is.

     
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  4. soulre@per

    soulre@per Newbie

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    Quite deep & It makes me feel quite an insignificant speck.
     
  5. imperial109

    imperial109 Regular Member

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    Lol. He thinks hes anonymous on the internet. I wonder how long it will be before he dies of unknown causes.
     
  6. IamNRE

    IamNRE Jr. VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

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    TL;DR

    A "decision maker" from the music industry was invited to a secret meeting with other "decision maker" from the industry back in the early 90s and they agreed to fade out conscious rap and play more Gansta rap because doing this would get young black males to become ganstas and get locked up in private prisons (and the owners of those prisons owned/controlled those music labels).

    That gives you an idea of what its about.

    Pretty good read. Would make a kick ass movie.

    In be4 Spike Lee.

    [​IMG]
     
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  7. PlatinumPi4u

    PlatinumPi4u Junior Member

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    There is a youtube documentary called "illuminati and the music industry" or something along those lines... although it goes more into the occult side and not so much into the things mentioned in the above letter.

    Having many contacts in the hiphop industry, and having studied the NWO and their Occult and ways for many years, this letter above would seem to be on par for them.
     
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  8. eloquenceeee

    eloquenceeee Regular Member

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    Interesting article, to say the least.

    I think this may be a bit too conspiracy theory for me...but I'm not sure how I feel :p
     
  9. Serp_Pimp

    Serp_Pimp Junior Member

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    This here is why you have 20 year old kids with diamonds in their mouth rapping (probably written by the same crew that writes justin beiber songs) instead of a RUNDMC or KRS ONE.
     
  10. unknownn

    unknownn BANNED BANNED

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    Its a doktrin they are using for music and TV.Being a gangster is cool.Being a gangster gets you the good looking girls.Being a gangster makes you rich etc......
    If you look at todays youth they are so fucked with these crap trying to be hard and a man without a single cell in the brain.Its just horrible to see how its going.This is no conspiracy but you guys need to inform how TV and music influence your brain and behavior.
    There is a good reason people say the youth is getting dumber without attacking somebody personly but its a fact.I visited my old university a year ago and when i saw what they learn i was like wtf that level was so extremly low it was really shocking.
    Its nobodys fault but if you are still able to see yourself manipulations then you should see instantly the doktrin of TV and music.A good old movie which isnt shown on TV :) i guess cause its saying the truth about TV is network.Have a look at it.And yes prison are a big business.In the USA are today more prisoners than under Stalin in sovietrepublic .7.6 million in 2008 already.A student cost the state arround $9000 a prisoner arround $45000.On 100.000 citizens there are about 760 prisoners.In japan as example there are only 63 on 100.000 .
    And these are numbers from New York Magazin.
     
  11. peter73

    peter73 Regular Member

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    Why would the government pay them if they put more people to jail? I really don't get that...
     
  12. unknownn

    unknownn BANNED BANNED

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    Thats transfering money from citizens to a small group
     
  13. Tsmash

    Tsmash Regular Member

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    this is completely untrue.
     
  14. backontrack

    backontrack Power Member

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    This was a great read, got into it, Did anyone else have a mini movie playing in there head?
     
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  15. paddler

    paddler Registered Member

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    Damn it feels good to be a gangsta.

    It is human nature to glorify bad guys. Robin hood,Pirates,Viva Zapata,Butch Cassidy and the Sundance kid, Billy the Kid,Darth Vader.
    Rap is no different and it is a big presumption to think that a few guys in a meeting can control anything. If they could they would be meeting every week.
     
  16. oguen

    oguen Regular Member

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    i was just going to believe it but then you destroyed all arguments with "this is completely untrue" - thank you, now i can sleep well again
     
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  17. illfounded21

    illfounded21 Senior Member

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    Interesting read for sure, but I don't buy in to it completely. I don't think that they created the gangster rap movement, I think if they did anything- they probably jumped on / helped stimulate an already growing trend.

    I'm pretty sure there was an economic downturn and recession in the late 80's/ early 90's in the USA, and worsening socio-economic conditions provide ample breeding ground for gritty gangster rap, as peoples everyday lives get that little bit harder.
     
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  18. Tsmash

    Tsmash Regular Member

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    Yeah sorry about that. I mean, why wouldn't some guy who was at this "secret meeting" randomly drop this story into the inbox of some guy from a relatively unknown news site. That's the way to make sure it gets real exposure!

    I mean, who on earth would make up a story of this magnitude, and put it on their website hoping for it to go viral... I mean, who does that? Oh wait, everyone on this board.
     
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  19. GreenGoblin

    GreenGoblin BANNED BANNED

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    The story sounds so far fetched for me that's exactly why i believe it.
     
  20. sirthomas

    sirthomas Registered Member

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    Here's a video of a rapper expressing his views on the subject 3 years ago.

    youtube.ccccccccccccccccccccccom/watch?v=pV4mhxpaEmk
     
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