1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

The New Macbook Pro Doubles As A Fireplace

Discussion in 'BlackHat Lounge' started by The Scarlet Pimp, Apr 26, 2010.

  1. The Scarlet Pimp

    The Scarlet Pimp Jr. VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2008
    Messages:
    788
    Likes Received:
    3,120
    Occupation:
    Chair moistener.
    Location:
    Cyberspace
    don't try this at home kids! :261:

    Core i7 MacBook Pro Could Make Water Boil

    http://gizmodo.com/5524473/core-i7-macbook-pro-could-make-water-boil

    PC Authority was putting their new 17-inch, Core i7 MacBook Pro through their typical battery of benchmarks.

    Then, the chassis grew hot, and then a series of strange series of errors began to occur.

    The only way they could complete the testing to to turn the MBP on its side. The problem had to be heat.

    So PC Authority tried more tests (in both Boot Camp and OS X) while tracking CPU temperatures all the while. Skeptical of their own results, they turned off the system overnight and tested things again.

    In both instances, Cinebench—which is designed to tax the CPU in full—was able to heat the actual i7 cores to temperatures around 101°C, or almost 214°F.

    That's hotter than the boiling point of water.

    When the tests were repeated on a Fujitsu Lifebook SH 760 (loaded with the same i7 processor, but also a copper heatsink that vents out of side of a plastic chassis), the CPU was found to run at 81°C, or 178°F.

    To be fair, PC Authority admits that everyday use only cranked up the heat of the MBP CPU to around 194°F (still significantly hotter than the Fujitsu working at max CPU capacity)—but here's the rub: The MBP 17 isn't the sort of computer you buy for everyday use.

    You buy it to have a mobile processing workhorse. And it's hard to imagine that professionals won't find themselves dealing with these heat issues.

    Also, seeing these results in the 17-inch model makes us wonder, how will the smaller, 15-inch i7 deal with the heat?