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Selling real products to convenient stores and gas stations. help!

Discussion in 'Offline Marketing' started by tints, Feb 1, 2014.

  1. tints

    tints Newbie

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    Hey guys just hoping i can get some direction for an idea i have.

    Say I could obtain an item that many people would buy at a very good price, with a high profit margin in the novelty impulse item niche. Would it be possible to go store to store and try and set up an agreement where I could place the product there and give them a percentage of the profits, or possibly just sell them the item whole sale making a few bucks profit for myself. Or would they give me no time since they already have a vendor for there store.

    Keep in mind i have only one product I'm not trying to become there new vendor just trying to make a few dollars with this niche item. Would there be any success rate possible?

    Just thinking of the best way possible to approach them.

    Please any advice is helpful.
     
  2. eledesmaj

    eledesmaj Junior Member

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    I think this is the wrong forum for your question but to answer your question it's possible to do this. You want to start with ma and pa shops not corporate stores because most have a chain they have to follow for their suppliers but the best bet would be to wholesale the item that way you minimize risk of exposure with your product and getting payment.

    And just to be clear when you say they have a vendor you don't mean for the same product right?
     
  3. SocialMediaManager

    SocialMediaManager Elite Member

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    Wholesale the Item is best
    put other things in option if you have budget and can manage the hassle afterwards
     
  4. Techxan

    Techxan Elite Member

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    I know a local insurance guy who sells fruit pies to service stations. He buys them wholesale, marks them up slightly, and gets up everyday and makes the deliveries to his customers before he goes to the office.

    He is very diligent about this and though it was slow to start, he now has a good number of clients and is making a nice bit of side money.

    The main thing he told me is it has to sell, and it needs to start selling fast. Shelf space in these stores is limited and the owners will not handle something that doesn't move. If it is not making them money something else they can put in that space will.
     
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  5. craigygee

    craigygee Regular Member

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    Have them buy wholesale for sure. I have been doing this recently for a product of mine. What I started doing is putting together a folder with some info, analysis and taking snapshots of various earnings and such. If you can, pick out a good spot in their store for it to sit as well. Keep it short and sweet, make sure it's easy or them to understand as well because you have only a limited amount of time to capture their interest.
     
  6. tints

    tints Newbie

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    Thanks for all the responses sorry if it's in the wrong section.

    As far as whole selling i thought the idea of rack jobbing would be a better in. As the owner has to put no money down and only pays if items are sold. If the item doesn't sell we pick it up and are off simple as that.

    Secondly i don't believe vendors are carrying these as I've never seen them in any stores.

    As far as the person selling pies that's exactly what we want to do set up a route and go once a week to restock collect payments.

    Our only problem is how we should approach. We would only deal with mom and pop shops no chains. Should we just cold walk in and pitch or try and get an appointment by phone.

    The item will sell very well. The item cost us roughly 1.85 and can be in stores from 4.99 to 9.99 with 5.99 being a suggested prices. Would a 50/50 profit split 2 dollars to the owner be enticing enough to give it a try?

    Once again thanks for all the advice
     
  7. tony_d

    tony_d Elite Member

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    This is 100% right... if you get the shelf space, that's a job well done - then your product needs to move, and move fast! Once it's sold through several cycles you'll get a good idea of volume per store on average.

    Store owners are basically landlords - they own the space on the shelves, and by putting different items on that space they get different rates of return... so if your product is giving them 50% less for that space than another product, you better believe it's going to be off the shelves pretty quickly and returned back to you.
     
  8. wuquater

    wuquater Junior Member

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    Hi OP, my father told me once that he has delivered stuff to small stores in his university days. He told me that it was very hard to put items into the stores so he had to cone up with ideas. He had tried selling but none was ready to buy from him. He let someone build shelves for cheap, painted them with a nice color and took them into the stores in which he wanted his items to be sold. Without telling the store owner anything he simply got inside the built the shelf and put his products into it. The owners were a little bit schocked they simply looked at what he did. After finishing his work he simply told tge owners of tge store that they do not need to pay anything for the products and that he will come next week, if at least the half of the items is mot sold he will simply take the shelf and products and never gonna appear in the shop again. Guess what next were all the items sold and he a new shop to sell.

    So long story short, find a good looking display, put your products in it and bring it to the stores and do the same thing as my father did.

    Wish you lots success
     
  9. Techxan

    Techxan Elite Member

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    If you offer your product up front, place the display, and maintain your route so that all the merchant has to do is sell and profit, they will go for it.

    Tell them up front that it is a new product and that few people will be selling it right now, you will install and maintain the display, and remove old stock you should be fine.

    And by the way, small grocers pay cash for their products, so you should be able to pull inventory, tell them 20 units sold (or how many sold), restock, get paid for the sold units in cash.
     
  10. tints

    tints Newbie

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    Would these people be ok making 2.00 off a 6.00 item is that enticing enough? Should i just walk in and pitch or try and call first
     
  11. Techxan

    Techxan Elite Member

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    These people will respond to a 30-40% profit. In Houston, 35% markup is the norm, so you are about right on target.

    Walk in and pitch so they see the product.

    Also, find the local "Grocers supply" that supplies the local stores and pitch to them. Some products like bread and drinks will come off a route truck, but bulk groceries, canned goods and dry goods will come from a local distribution center.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2014