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Reporting & Review Monitoring

Discussion in 'Online Reputation Management (ORM)' started by mojito56, Jul 24, 2016.

  1. mojito56

    mojito56 Registered Member

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    I've got my review funnel developed and exporting form inputs into a CSV file. What do you guys find to be the best way to report your form inputs? The ideal would be something where the client can check on the feedback collected at any time rather than reports emailed weekly/bi-monthly.

    What I'm thinking for the long-term is have a dashboard developed where form inputs as well as review site postings are monitored with analytics. How can I go about continually scraping new reviews from review sites and exporting them to a CSV? I know there are plenty of tools to monitor reviews already, but it shouldn't be too difficult to develop your own system, right?
     
  2. Nullium

    Nullium Newbie

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    Hey Mojito!

    When I first started ORM I was in the same boat as you in regards to updating clients on their progress. I really wanted a real-time dashboard where clients could login and see review site statistics, current scores, etc. Everything would have been fine but like you brought up, scraping reviews that may have been left by someone who didn't use your funnel makes it hard (especially if you have clients who want you to target new review sites). Also, there may be errors when scraping and you would need to check the information (QA).

    I know it's not ideal, but I eventually decided to make a really nice quarterly report template in Photoshop for each client. It ended up working better because I can just take five minutes per client and see the current score, reviews that were left outside of my funnel, etc. The client likes the fact that they are emailed out (images are saved as PDF) and they don't have to worry about logging in to check, we handle it all for them. If you do it quarterly, it also makes the change in scores and number of reviews more dramatic for them instead of them logging in each week and not seeing much change.

    Another benefit of doing this is you don't have to spend a ton of time and resources developing the dashboard, and can just knock out all of your clients' reports every three months. Eventually it might be a great asset to have on your website, but most of my clients don't like to log in and do all of that, they just want to work on their business and check an email when it comes in.

    Cheers!
     
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  3. mojito56

    mojito56 Registered Member

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    Damn, I didn't even think of that. I guess bi-monthly was a bit too optimistic (and a lot more work too!).

    May I know how you present the form submissions to clients? Is that just emailed? From your experience, do most of your clients get multiple form submissions on a daily basis? What I'm afraid of is that business owners with high customer counts would get pretty annoyed by daily emails. I'm thinking the best work around to this would be to export form inputs to a mySQL database instead of a CSV file, sorting by descending dates. There are some really neat mySQL reporting tools, so maybe if I arrange for reports to be sent out every 2-3 days instead, that could be a viable alternative.
     
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    Last edited: Jul 25, 2016
  4. Nullium

    Nullium Newbie

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    I originally had it to where each form submission would have the information put into a SQL database so I could compile the info for the clients later (for trends and customer insights into why their business was getting bad reviews). The clients would also be sent an email automatically when a person left a review, good or bad. I started getting requests from one of my clients (a restaurant owner) who wanted to just receive the suppressed bad reviews so she could reach out to the customer.

    After that email from her, I decided to redesign the review funnel. It seemed that some of the clients were more interested in mitigating the bad reviews quickly. They didn't really care about the good reviews as long as their rating on the review sites were going up from them. I eventually eliminated the database entries and had a PHP form send an email to the client and I when a bad review was left on the funnel. If a good rating was left, I would get the customer off of the review site as fast as possible. For each client, I have the funnel choose at random what review site the customer will be directed to, so it 'evens' out the reviews and simplifies it for the reviewer.

    So basically, my review funnels do everything on-page. The client's email, my email, and the review sites the webpage chooses to direct to are the only things that I have to grab from a database, but I don't put anything into one. This makes it so much easier and simpler for me and the clients. Although it seems like the more features you have for ORM will make the clients happier, at the end of the day we're selling them solutions instead of features. They want to increase sales, increase their local reputation, and increase how the public perceives their business.

    It seems like you really want to help your clients and care, which is great! :)

    What kind of clients are you targeting?

    One interesting thing I tried out that helped a ton was 'reverse incentives' (http://www.localvisibilitysystem.com/2014/09/24/you-can-incentivize-google-plus-reviews-just-not-in-the-way-youd-think/). Basically, if you mention on the feedback cards (the ones that the customers use to get to the funnel) that if they mention an employee in their review, the employee will be rewarded. It's pretty cool because if the staff (let's say a restaurant for example) knows that the review cards they hand out to their customers could get them an extra $100.00 every few months, they will work harder to get a good review. This helps the business reputation also, so it's a win-win. The restaurant has to be willing to reward though, lol.

    Anyway, that's how I do it. It is way more automated than it sounds. The business is given a ton of feedback cards with the review funnel URL, they do all the legwork. I check all of the target review sites for increases in numbers, and compile a nice quarterly report (takes an hour for each client... literally only 4 hours of work per year).

    I am typing this at 5:00 AM, so it's kind of all over the place. I might start a super detailed ORM journey soon for tidbits of juicy information that will definitely help you out! If you have any questions, let me know. I've attached what my funnel looks like (with an example for Golden Corral). I've found that the faster you get the happy customers to a review site, the better. I don't ask for any emails, names, etc. I only do that for the bad reviews.

    Review.png Review2.png Review3.png
     
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    Last edited: Jul 25, 2016
  5. mojito56

    mojito56 Registered Member

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    I sincerely appreciate you sharing your experience. It seems like you've spent a great deal of time thinking about how to optimise your review funnel and reporting.

    The reverse incentives idea sounds like it could be a pretty big improvement to the classic feedback card format. Unfortunately I don't think reverse incentives would be suitable for the clients I'll be targetting initially with cold mail (specialised doctors). Another twist that can be added to feedback cards is to make it double as a discount card. You could have a message like, "present this card at your next purchase with us to receive a 5-10% discount." The customer would be less likely to throw the card away immediately (and more likely to go through the funnel). On top of that, it effectively serves as a form of advertising where the customer is constantly exposed to the client's brand every time they open their wallets. Again, don't know how effective that'd be with doctors :D

    I'm sure the community here would love to hear your journey. After all, discussions on actual review funnel strategies seem to have died out a fair bit.
     
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  6. Nullium

    Nullium Newbie

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    Thank you, I appreciate it! There has been a lot of changes to my initial attempts (following the 7878 method that opened this opportunity for me)... After a while I started targeting mainly restaurants as there are a lot of them and they always pop up everywhere (surprising I know. I was going after apartment buildings and hotels for a while). The owners are easier to find too.

    I do have a dentist client still which might be similar in setup to the specialized doctors you're targeting. I designed business cards to be the feedback cards (super cheap and fit in wallets easier) and the dentist put them in a business card holder (http://www.displays2go.com/P-657/5-x-7-Acrylic-Business-Card-Display-with-Sign-Holder) where the patients were checking out and getting their next visits in order. Doubling them as a discount card is a great idea! I might have to borrow that idea from you... ;)

    I've noticed the ORM section here has already kind of evolved into its own little thing, but I like sticking to the original idea. I really hope it goes well for you, we all can't wait to hear how it goes!