Question for the ORM experts about medical

coolsheet

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I've done ORM myself. However I've never encountered an issue like this. Usually we just push the results down as it's always been the client name and maybe a modifier like "reviews" that we need to create pages for.

I have a client who's a surgeon and was affiliated with a faulty organization in the past. Which is why he started his own practice. However as of recently an old page on a site has arised in the medical malpractice space with out dated medical malpractice suits which mention my client when you query "client name + malpractice". In fact all of the suits were settled out of court and many of them didn't go through.

I'm literally racking my brain as to what Im going to do to push these results down. Any ideas?

Honestly be willing to hire someone at this point.
 

BHopkins

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I can see a couple of different possibilities for success here.

1. Create an alter ego. If your client is a surgeon, the alter ego would be a dentist or something in an unrelated medical field. The alter ego would be a long way away and the city/state would need to be prominent. I would also make sure the alter ego doesn't match the client's age, appearance, etc. Make sure it's obvious this is not the person the searcher is looking for. Now you're free to use the word malpractice saying the alter ego has no malpractice suits against them.

2. Fix the related and auto-complete search results. If you see "Client Name malpractice", you'll need to backfill with relevant search results like city, occupation, LinkedIn, reviews, office name, specialty, etc. You'll essentially push "malpractice" out of the auto-complete (or related searches).

3. Directly attack SERPs. This would be my last resort as it's likely to cause more questions than it solves. You could publish content saying "Client name malpractice" then defend the client in the content. The problem is the first impression is that he has been sued for malpractice. You'll have a tough time overcoming that first impression and everyone is going to click that auto-complete further reinforcing that as a suggestion. I really don't like this as a solution, but it's required for some clients. We have a client right now that we're doing this for, he is insistent that we fight the negative with his "proof" that he wasn't involved with the business that went bankrupt. When you search his name you see "bankruptcy" as an auto-complete term. He wants to publish content about bankruptcy showing him as the hero instead of the villain. Not sure if it will work, but I've presented my case to him multiple times but he wants to go a different direction so we'll do our best!

Hope that helps!
 

coolsheet

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I can see a couple of different possibilities for success here.

1. Create an alter ego. If your client is a surgeon, the alter ego would be a dentist or something in an unrelated medical field. The alter ego would be a long way away and the city/state would need to be prominent. I would also make sure the alter ego doesn't match the client's age, appearance, etc. Make sure it's obvious this is not the person the searcher is looking for. Now you're free to use the word malpractice saying the alter ego has no malpractice suits against them.
Straight fire, thanks for this!

 

tidelow

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I can see a couple of different possibilities for success here.

1. Create an alter ego. If your client is a surgeon, the alter ego would be a dentist or something in an unrelated medical field. The alter ego would be a long way away and the city/state would need to be prominent. I would also make sure the alter ego doesn't match the client's age, appearance, etc. Make sure it's obvious this is not the person the searcher is looking for. Now you're free to use the word malpractice saying the alter ego has no malpractice suits against them.

2. Fix the related and auto-complete search results. If you see "Client Name malpractice", you'll need to backfill with relevant search results like city, occupation, LinkedIn, reviews, office name, specialty, etc. You'll essentially push "malpractice" out of the auto-complete (or related searches).

3. Directly attack SERPs. This would be my last resort as it's likely to cause more questions than it solves. You could publish content saying "Client name malpractice" then defend the client in the content. The problem is the first impression is that he has been sued for malpractice. You'll have a tough time overcoming that first impression and everyone is going to click that auto-complete further reinforcing that as a suggestion. I really don't like this as a solution, but it's required for some clients. We have a client right now that we're doing this for, he is insistent that we fight the negative with his "proof" that he wasn't involved with the business that went bankrupt. When you search his name you see "bankruptcy" as an auto-complete term. He wants to publish content about bankruptcy showing him as the hero instead of the villain. Not sure if it will work, but I've presented my case to him multiple times but he wants to go a different direction so we'll do our best!

Hope that helps!

Same experience here, I normally create up to 10 exact match or partial match domains using business/profile websites on difficult keywords/names.

Also make sure to take advantage of as many rich schema markups in all your content, take up all the rich snippets, YouTube video, job ad, faq, knowledge graph, GMB, ect.

Regarding your bankruptcy client, I would create a unaffiliated website that highly specializes in bankruptcy services, debt financing ect. Just charge more, you can sell the leads or website to an operating company later.
 
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