1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Power Invertor or generator?

Discussion in 'BlackHat Lounge' started by Roparadise, Sep 3, 2012.

  1. Roparadise

    Roparadise BANNED BANNED

    Joined:
    May 25, 2011
    Messages:
    786
    Likes Received:
    1,417
    If you had to choose between spending $1,000 on a generator that uses as low as 1.73G/Day of fuel(6.5L/Day) enough to provide 225 watts and uses 3.79G/Day(14.34L/Day) at 900 watts or a 1,000 watt power inverter that you connect to your car and you will use as much as 30G/Day of fuel(113L/Day) but will only cost you $200 to buy.

    I'm not sure if I want to shell out $1,000 eventually to be able to keep doing Im when the power goes out for an extended period of time,but I also don't want to buy and store massive amounts of fuel as well,since its such a hazard to keep enough to power stuff for a few days if I'm using my car to save $800 in initial purchase.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2012
  2. B. Friendly

    B. Friendly BANNED BANNED

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2012
    Messages:
    388
    Likes Received:
    480
    Well first I bet you $200 that 1000W inverter can't produce 1000 Watts for longer than 30 seconds.

    Is this for sustain survival in the event of a nuclear holocaust, are you camping for a week or traveling across the country, or what.

    There are other options besides the $1000 brand new generator. You can buy used. You can buy diesel powered generator, or propane. I like propane because you can use the same fuel for heat & cooking.

    There are also batteries and solar chargers and wind generators.
     
  3. Roparadise

    Roparadise BANNED BANNED

    Joined:
    May 25, 2011
    Messages:
    786
    Likes Received:
    1,417
    I found a larger generator for $200,that has good ratings on amazon. Its just 31 pounds more and puts out 68db compared to the 59db of the one I first looked at.I orginally looked at the honda eu1000i,but I like the APG3014 from all power america,much more now.

    But if i really want alot of power, I would go for the 6500 watt diesel generator from them(All power America) as its 65% more efficient then the 2000watt generator.
     
  4. B. Friendly

    B. Friendly BANNED BANNED

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2012
    Messages:
    388
    Likes Received:
    480
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decibel
     
  5. Lazlo1967

    Lazlo1967 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2012
    Messages:
    198
    Likes Received:
    54
    I went through this research after a 1 week power outage last year. My conclusion was to go with a LP generator (6500 Watts). It will easily power most of my house in an outage - you need to really add up all of the appliances and other thing (TVs, lights, etc.) you wan to run in an outage to see how many watts you need. Also, don't forget that some appliances like refrigerators require extra watts to start running (called surge watts).

    LP generators run off of 20 lbs gas tanks, like the one's used for BBQs. These can be stored almost indefinitely and are not volatile. No need to worry about gas spills, bad gas, or fire. The only drawback is that these generators are somewhat less efficient than gas. Another great reason for using LP is that in a regional outage you will not be able to get gas - the pumps don't work.
     
  6. B. Friendly

    B. Friendly BANNED BANNED

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2012
    Messages:
    388
    Likes Received:
    480
    Propane = LP gas = Butane

    It does't have to be a 20 lb. tank. you can get one of the large, household-sized tanks and run a gas line to the generator with an adapter.

    above-ground-propane-tank.jpg
     
  7. jdog37

    jdog37 Power Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2009
    Messages:
    510
    Likes Received:
    569
    Occupation:
    unemployed electrician
    Location:
    virginia
    I would suggest that you look into "powerpacks" that provide battery power and include a built in converter to run household powered items.

    They are available in many different wattage's according to what you require. They can be recharged via a/c power in your home or by the battery voltage from your vehicle. If you had 2 of them, you could run 1 dead and use the other while the first is recharging thru your cars alternator.

    I am assuming that you are only going to be running a laptop or desktop and maybe a router. Cause these things are not really made to run a lot of high wattage household items. But the higher wattage ones will take some pretty decent loads.

    I think this would be the answer to your problem because you would not need to run a generator or your vehicle constantly to provide power. Not sure how long it takes to fully charge via your vehicle but it wouldn't take anywhere near 30 gallons a day to run a pc and a few other things.

    A quick search on google found this:
    http://www.duracellpower.com/portable-power/default.aspx

    The powerpacks are at the bottom of the page and start at a little over a hundred bucks. You will just want to do a little bit of calculating on what your power requirements are and what size pack(s) you will need. Some things to consider before buying would be battery life... (A higher wattage than needed will hold a charge and last much longer than one that meets the minimum requirement for your needs.) You should also consider charge time via a vehicle charging system... (The longer it takes to reach full charge means the more gas you will burn = more money.) Check the specs for this stuff.

    I am an electrician by trade and could help you figure out what size would suit you if you needed such help.

    EDIT: When reading your original post I thought you were only looking for a secondary power source for your computer so you could maintain your SEO projects if the power went out. I assumed that you would be eating beef jerky, drinking beer from a cooler, and using a candle to find your way to the bathroom to take a piss.

    But after reading further I see mentions of 6500 watt generators and such. There is way more to powering your entire house than just buying a generator. There are codes and stuff that require you to use transfer switches and other equipment that must be installed by a certified electrician. The cost of the secondary equipment and the professional services can double or even triple the cost of the generator alone.

    Keep in mind that any of the smaller fuel powered generators will need to be operated outside of your home because of the exhaust and potential carbon monoxide hazards. This will require long extension cords that may reduce the efficiency and the actual output of the generators maximum rating.



    As stated before... Holler at me if you need some help.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2012
  8. Roparadise

    Roparadise BANNED BANNED

    Joined:
    May 25, 2011
    Messages:
    786
    Likes Received:
    1,417
    If I choose a portable generator with built in, invertor I can connect directly to my devices instead of connecting to my house and needing to be up to code etc?
     
  9. Lazlo1967

    Lazlo1967 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2012
    Messages:
    198
    Likes Received:
    54
    Most good portable generators provide two options for powering your house. The first is a 220 Volt output which you can connect to a transfer switch (you need to have this installed be an electrician). The second, is to just run extension cords from the generator to the devices you need to power. Since the generator is outside and your devices, appliances, etc. are presumably inside you'll want some heavy duty extension cords for this (yellow or orange are best). Never plug the generator into a house socket - you can electrocute the guys working to repair the lines as the power flows back toward them (the transfer switch prevents this). Depending on where you live a transfer switch - installed - will probably run you about $500 (the right extension cords might run you $100 or more).
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1