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Owning your own CB product - testimonials, FTC, and legalities?

Discussion in 'Clickbank' started by dotthei, Apr 6, 2010.

  1. dotthei

    dotthei Regular Member

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    Yeah, I'm sure there's some thread where this has been discussed in-depth, and unfortunately, I can't find it.


    I do, however, have some questions about owning your own CB product, and how being sued, or serving time in jail can come into play...


    Let's say you buy PLR from a PLR site, get a minisite/sales page, and launch your own weightloss product....What are the full foundations and compliancy you have to follow in regards to testimonials, disclaimers, terms and conditions, etc, etc.


    What are the rules, and MOST IMPORTANTLY laws you have to follow on your sales page? For example, can you use fake testimonials...can you use fake before and after pics...can you get paid testimonials...can I use one of my buddies pics, etc, etc. There's quite a few people who use fake stuff (until they can get actual testimonials), and there's plenty of PLR stuff that comes with testimonials (whether they're real or fake, who knows) as well.


    And I'm not just talking about the weightloss niche, this can apply acne, PE, making money, dog training, etc, etc.


    Is there like a bible that one can follow when it comes to sales pages, and what's allowed, and what isn't allowed?


    The prospect of launching my own product sounds awesome, but being sued or jail time does not. :(
     
  2. brookshire

    brookshire Junior Member

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    I'm not sure of the legalities, but I know that using CB to sell your own product can be very profitable depending on the quality of it.
     
  3. gonzomcribbinz

    gonzomcribbinz Regular Member

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    I haven't seen any kind of "be all, end all" document that would really specifically cover everything that you're asking but here's some reference material that you'll definitely find useful:

    FTCs endorsement rules - You definitely need to read it but grab some coffee first. It's a surefire cure for insomnia.

    Clickbank Client Contract - Knowing the "ins and outs" of what Clickbank wants will go a long way in not only getting your product approved, but also to keep you at least somewhere near being legal. Careful, though...if you do ever come under scrutiny from the FTC, Clickbank does NOT have your back and will lump all responsibility on you - and, to be honest, rightfully so.

    Get Started as a Vendor - Helpful for setting everything up, just in case you hadn't seen it yet.


    Here's the deal from what I understand, as long as you're not blatantly lying in your product claims, blatantly forging testimonials, representing yourself as a medical professional, or advertising false cures then it's pretty safe to assume that you're 99.999% safe. YMMV, of course, and I am NOT a legal professional.

    I specialize in promoting CB health, wellness, and fitness products as both an affiliate and a vendor and I've had the same concerns as you before. I do my best to make sure that I'm complying and go from there. At the end of the day, if the FTC ever targeted ANY sales copy, they're going to find something they don't like, period. If you think that's far-fetched then just listen to this interview with the Assistant Deputy at The Federal Trade Commission and you can tell by his "hemming and hawing" around certain questions that were asked of him that he didn't really have any clear-cut answers for the mind-bogglingly large amount of gray areas that occur in online marketing. What I took away from it is to stay under the radar.

    And that's not terribly difficult to do. Yeah, make your money - of course - but these guys are still chasing down Acai rebills, gov't grant shit, and whatever-the-hell other actual scammy shit is going down raking in millions per day...do you really think that yours or my digital product making $x,xxx to $xx,xxx will ever be a blip on their radar? I don't. Of course, I keep my ducks as much in a row as possible just to be safe, but I don't lose sleep over worrying whether or not I'm gonna get sued either.

    Cliff notes: play by the basic rules of human decency, have your disclaimers posted on your site, and abide by the general rules of Clickbank and you shouldn't have anything to worry about.

    (but if the feds do come crashing through your door to confiscate your stack of .pdfs and haul away your one-time-offers, you don't know me. :D)

     
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  4. tacopalypse

    tacopalypse Executive VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

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  5. brookshire

    brookshire Junior Member

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  6. zebrahat

    zebrahat Elite Member

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    Very basically as far as the FTC is concerned, disclose your relationship to any product you are 'reviewing' and be able to clearly document endorsements/testimonials your product is represented to have gotten. Don't photoshop a picture of a celebrity or TV personality with the product and say they stand by it, that kind of thing. Maybe we should start to put our affiliate sites on an offshore server and domain, to stay clear of trouble.
     
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