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New gTLDs still don't offer an SEO edge - at least according to Google

Discussion in 'Black Hat SEO' started by Diamond Damien, Aug 2, 2015.

  1. Diamond Damien

    Diamond Damien Owner BlackHatWorld Staff Member Jr. VIP

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    New gTLDs still don't offer an SEO edge - at least according to Google...... BHW what have you seen?

    The latest generation of generic top-level domains is more popular than ever. In fact, according to domain name industry blog TheDomains, 2015 was the first year in which new gTLD registrations rose above 5 million.
    There's a lot to like about these gTLDs. For starters, they help make websites more identifiable with just a quick glance at the URL, offering information about regions of focus, topic areas, business sectors, brand affiliation and more. According to nTLDStats.com, .club, .berlin, .science and .realtor were all among the top 10 most registered new gTLDs earlier this year. Although the new gTLDs are growing in popularity, they're still unusual enough to be memorable, as well as a great way to directly associate websites with their primary purpose. But do they offer any SEO advantages?

    Google says no
    John Mueller, webmaster trends analyst for Google, recently made a post on Google's Webmaster Central Blog to address misconceptions about new gTLDs' search benefits - or lack thereof.
    "Overall, our systems treat new gTLDs like other gTLDs (like .com and .org)," he wrote. "Keywords in a TLD do not give any advantage or disadvantage in search."
    In an article for The Register, Kieren McCarthy, former general manager of public participation at the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, pointed out that Google is no stranger to stressing that new gTLDs don't represent a silver bullet for search rankings. In fact, July's blog post marks the third time someone over at Google has felt the need to set the record straight.
    It was SEO guru Matt Cutts who first tackled the issue back in 2012 via a Google Plus post.
    "You shouldn't register a TLD in the mistaken belief that you'll get some sort of boost in search engine rankings," Cutts said.
    Late last year, Mueller responded to renewed buzz about the SEO benefits of the new gTLDs by resharing Cutts' post on his own Google Plus account.
    "There still is no inherent ranking advantage to using the new TLDs," he confirmed. However, a swath of studies suggest otherwise, which is a big part of the reason why the rumors just won't die.

    Other analysis says yes
    Bill Hartzer, senior SEO strategist at Dallas-based consultancy Globe Runner and UnGagged Las Vegas 2015 speaker, conducted an experiment last September that seemed to prove Cutts and Mueller wrong. By running a Google AdWords analysis, he found that the new gTLDs garnered more impressions at a lower cost. And Globe Runner's findings are by no means a one-off. McCarthy cited research from Total Websites and Searchmetrics that came to a similar conclusion about position improvements.
    Even though Google is sticking to its guns about how the new gTLDs are currently being handled from an SEO perspective, the door is still open for it to change its algorithms in the future - and Mueller even acknowledged as much in his post on the Webmaster Central Blog. McCarthy predicted that this shift will likely occur within the next couple of years.
    Do you agree with McCarthy's timeline? Have you experienced any positive SEO effects associated with the new gTLDs? Let us know in this thread. .
     
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  2. Panther28

    Panther28 Jr. VIP Jr. VIP

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    I barely ever see these new TLD's to make much of a judgment about them. Where the hell are they all?
     
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  3. Aluminium

    Aluminium Jr. VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

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    I was about to say that.

    If Google doesn't mind the TLD's, why do I never see them!? Is it just people who dedicate themselves to new TLD's that use them?
     
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  4. misteryou.

    misteryou. Power Member

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    I have seen a lot of them used only for spamming and making some junk sites, also some extensions were free or for 1 buck, wich surely explain
     
  5. pixeltech

    pixeltech Newbie

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    Two thoughts: (1) of course Google is not going to rank a site using one of the new gTLDs any higher than they would a site using one of the more "traditional" TLDs, that being said, I am sure that common sense does dictate that they factor the particular gTLD in question into their overall keyword scoring for the domain name portion of their algorithm, whereas before the TLDs like ".com" or ".net" could probably have been safely ignored without skewing things much at all, but all that means is that the domain names floridarealtor.com or newjerseyrealtor.net probably rank about the same in that regard as forida.realtor or newjersey.realtor (2) eventually, yes, the new gTLDs will become more and more commonplace, because the simple fact of the matter is that the namespace for the original TLDs is becoming exhausted in the sense that semantically valid, keyword rich, relevant domain names are becoming harder and harder to find for virtually any niche in every industry out there, with many people squatting on domains trying to make a quick buck off of some naive fool desperate to improve their search ranking (but without wanting to put any of the real work into it), with some of the choicer "premium" domains going for tens of thousands of dollars, and in my opinion the new gTLDs could be an opportunity to sort of level the playing field once again in this sense, but who can say for sure, guess we will just have to wait and see...