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How Firm is the 30-day Redemption Period?

Discussion in 'Domain Names & Parking' started by B. Friendly, Oct 22, 2012.

  1. B. Friendly

    B. Friendly BANNED BANNED

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    I met a guy today, found how he had a website at one time, made the pitch to do Local SEO and he said his "site was down". So I went home, and just checked his domain and it's expired since 06 Sep 12, but the status still shows as "Redemption". Whois says the registrar is TuCows, but their site does not give any information on the domain at all.

    What's the true status of this domain? is there any hope of recovery? I don't want to post the URL in public. It's not a high-dollar URL, but it was the guy's business site and it has some age and is worth keeping if possible. PM if you think giving you the URL will help. Thanks.
     
  2. DesignerDrug

    DesignerDrug Registered Member

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    very firm. After 30 days, you can't get that domain back, until its available to buy again, which could be 6 months to 12 months

    also, you should call tucow or send them an email. If its in redemption, that means you can still get it back, after redemption period ends, you cannot.
     
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  3. B. Friendly

    B. Friendly BANNED BANNED

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    Thanks for the information. I read your post and 10 seconds later the guy called me. I just gave him the bad news. I'll check with Tucows and see what they say. He claims he paid for the registration for 2 years, and that we are just into the 2nd year, and I'm wondering if that's possible. He's not expert with this stuff, and it sounds to me like he thinks he did the domain name registration through his webhosting service, Intuit.

    Is that possible? Do webhosting services act as "middleman" and register domain names? Is it possible they dropped the ball and he lost his domain due to their error?

    Thanks again for you help. You are helping real people, in real time, over real stuff, and I appreciate it very much.
     
  4. MrFleetwood

    MrFleetwood Newbie

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    If the domain is in status "redemption" then you need to contact the registrar ASAP and pay the redemption fee which is about $200.Some registrars are shady in terms of redemption, right before it would enter the official ICANN redemption period they will pay the renewal themselves, and then if you want the domain back they charge you the redemption fee and pocket it. The redemption fee is high, yes, but it's charged by the registry.
     
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  5. DesignerDrug

    DesignerDrug Registered Member

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    No problem.
    It's not possible for the domain to be put into the redemption period before it expires.

    MrFleetwood is right as well, getting ahold of the registrar, is important if you want to keep that domain, or if your client wants it that bad. It will cost $200 to get it out of redemption though.

    A lot of webhosting companies act as middlemen when it comes to registering domains. HostGator, even though they are a registrar now, with their site launchpad, they still use a seperate registrar for their domains.
     
  6. B. Friendly

    B. Friendly BANNED BANNED

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    So it's possible that the registrar (either Tucows or Intuit) paid the registration fee? If that's so, then how does WhoIs come to list the domain as being in "Redemption" status?

    In order for this to happen, the Registrar would have to falsely report the domain as having been expired (but it didn't) and that it is in redemption (but it isn't) in order to then charge the customer the redemption fee, but they (the customer) doesn't know the domain's true status.

    Which sounds highly fraudulent and criminal to me.

    Add in the customer's claim that he paid for 2 years of domain "something" (I don't think he knows the difference between hosting & registration), this looks like quite the scam to me. Almost unbelievable. They would have to do this on a huge scale in order for it to be worth the effort.

    Is all of this possible?
     
  7. DesignerDrug

    DesignerDrug Registered Member

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    Well, The registrar would pay the registration or the redemption fee. It's possible, but it would be luck, if that happened.

    The only solid solution to this, would be doing the whois, calling up the registrar, and pretend you are your client.

    And your right, it sounds illegal for that scenario, but I don't think that would have happened; the registrar paying the fee's.

    I think your client probably just paid for 2 years of hosting, like you said. It can be easily mistaken that you get the "domain" for the length of hosting.
    The hosting companies usually don't make it clear enough that the domain, unless specified differently, is only on a year by year fee.
    by chance have you or your client tried logging into the registrar account ? do a forgot password for his/her email address.

    If you can view that account through them, I'm sure you would understand what actually happened.