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How do you respond to tough realities in business?

Discussion in 'Making Money' started by OTrap, Jan 18, 2013.

  1. OTrap

    OTrap Jr. VIP Jr. VIP

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    I was just watching a clip from a movie I like (Glengary Glen Ross), and it reminded me of the two ways a person might be prone to responding to tough truths in business.

    How do YOU respond? Do you get offended and take it personally?

    Or do you get mad and motivated?

    (WARNING: Strong Language)
     
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  2. myownhero

    myownhero Power Member Premium Member

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    I'm guessing this is the coffee is for closers speech. The whole thing is a litte too Ayn Rand for my tastes (the idea that I'm somehow superior because I make more money is laughable) - regardless, if it gets you motivated whatever works.
     
  3. OTrap

    OTrap Jr. VIP Jr. VIP

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    I don't think that's the point of the speech, and it's not as much motivation as it is to determine attitude, I think.

    However, let's be honest for a moment. In BUSINESS, the goal is to make money. Thus, if you make more money, you ARE superior ... in business, and if that's the topic of discussion, then the reality might not be pretty, but it's true.

    In the video, though, the emphasis on the entire thing is that there are no sufficient excuses, and that what you think you ARE doesn't mean shit compared to what you DO.

    Whether it's "the leads are weak" or "it's a tough racket" or "at least I'm a nice guy," it doesn't matter. Nobody in business is going to feel sorry for you or make special exception for your underachievement to be excused. They're not going to throw you a bone out of the kindness of their hearts.

    The world of enterprise is unsympathetic most of the time, so what's wrong with an Ayn Rand outlook?

    And if someone doesn't like it, why? What would be the preferred outlook?
     
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  4. myownhero

    myownhero Power Member Premium Member

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    In capitalism the goal is to make money, businesses on the other hand can exist to serve both individual and special (and often charitable) interests.

    I didn't really want to debate this or anything especially since I agree with a large part of what you're saying, the only distinguishable difference is that I also view the Ayn Rand philosophy as a rationalization. When I hear someone say "I couldn't make a sale because the leads were weak" I hear a rationalization. But when I hear someone say "I make more money therefore I am more successful" I also hear a rationalization.

    We all excel at different things and we all want to believe that everybody should be judged just on that one thing but it never quite works out that way.
     
  5. Duffers5000

    Duffers5000 Elite Member

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    I've seen the clip before. Its good tv(movie) but not realistic. In the real world the sales guys would have kicked eight kinds of shit out of the Baldwin character the second he started that theatrical crap. I think it was written by David Mamet, all his work is posturing faux hemmingway stuff.

    The line that does have resonance for me is "the leads are weak" Ive been told this before and it hurts when you know they are not. In this instance they were getting real estate leads on a building project....Unbelievably strong leads and I would be having words with my team if I heard that(although not polishing my rolex in front of them , saying they were worthless)

    Some salespeople need to spend a day knocking on doors with the Jehovahs Witnesses to see what real weak leads look like.
     
  6. tacopalypse

    tacopalypse Executive VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

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  7. OTrap

    OTrap Jr. VIP Jr. VIP

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    Other goals CAN exist in business, but they run alongside making money. Thus, making money is still the constant.

    Now, if we're talking non-profits, that's a different discussion.

    Well, I do too, provided that the person saying it is assuming more than he should. Between two business people, particularly in the event that they work in the private sector, making more money is indeed the determiner of success, but I concur that it doesn't venture away from there. It doesn't make you a better or more successful human being, or any branch off of that.

    But again, being a better person isn't what makes you primarily valuable to an industry. If your future experience at a company could be summed up this way, you would not be a good hire for any private enterprise:

    "Hello. My name is OTrap. I work very hard, giving 100% in all I do. I won't ever take sick days. I'm a very nice person, and I'm genuinely more honest than most. However, I will only be a break-even employee and will never make you more money than it costs to employ me."

    If you are the perfect candidate for a job EXCEPT for being profitable, you're not a viable employee. That's exacerbated if the employer knows the real potential of your position and sees substantial underachievement (as in the clip), at which point giving a taste of what is possible betwixt a swift kick in the pants isn't a bad option.

    I didn't hear Baldwin's character say the money made him better as much as I heard him say that the fact that THEY weren't doing it made them gross underachievers.

    Again true, but we're dealing specifically with business here. If someone is a world-renowned pianist, but they suck as a sales person, they should not be treated as an equal in a sales business.

    I don't hear "I'm better than you because I make more money." I hear "You suck because all this money is possible with what you have available to you, and you're not even close to achieving it."

    Eh, I've been yelled at in a similar fashion in a sales-driven industry. There were probably 20 of us or so in the room. We all got the ass chewing, but we didn't kick any shit out of him. One person quit in the middle of it, and some complained, but nothing I heard him say was wrong. It honestly helped. It wasn't quite the same as this clip, obviously, but some of the verbiage and name-calling was pretty similar.