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[GUIDE] How to Get a Career Using IM, NOT College! Part 1: Find the Right Job

Discussion in 'BlackHat Lounge' started by Windmill, Jul 11, 2012.

  1. Windmill

    Windmill Supreme Member

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    [GUIDE] How to Get a Career Using IM, NOT College! Part 1: Find the Right Job


    When I decided to get a career marketing job, I applied for just TWO jobs. Guess what? I got offered BOTH. And guess what? I am in my early twenties. Without a degree. Choosing to pursue IM instead of a degree doesn't hurt your career potential - it HELPS it. I decided to create this thread because I saw someone else post a question about wanting to leave the full-time IM biz behind and pick up a job... the problem being, they don't have a degree. But trust me, this doesn't matter.


    Your IM experience is real-life marketing experience. In marketing, employers don't care about grades.


    What they care about is money. If you can show them that you = money, they will want you. I will take you step-by-step how I got a career using 3 years worth of IM experience. This is going to be a long guide, so it will be broken up into 3 different threads.

    1. Part 1: Finding the right job
    2. Part 2: Nailing the CV
    3. Part 3: Acing the Interview
    PART 1: Finding The Right Job

    This part will take you through the following things; it will show you how to know what you are qualified for, it will show you how to find jobs and it will show you how to pick the job that will make you the happiest (VERY important).

    Step 1: Know What You Are Qualified For

    Sit down and take out a pen and paper. Write down ALL of your skills. I mean it; write down ALL of your skills. Don't be shy.

    WHAT I DID: Here are some skills I wrote down; Copy writing, online conversion tracking, link building, wordpress website creation, basic-moderate graphic design/photoshop skills, basic-to-moderate video creation skills, good phone manner, creative, inquisitive, adwords, facebook ads, running facebook pages, using twitter, and experience in google analytics.

    Once you know all of your skills, and you understand your skills, knowing if you are qualified for a job is simple. You aren't just qualified in SEO, Adwords and Web Development. Take what you do, and break it down at its core. For example, lets take an e-commerce site. You have created a little drop-ship e-commerce site. Here is SOME of what you have done, at its core:

    • Website Creation: Not only did you have website creation skills, you also designed a website to convert customers.
    • Analytics: The vast majority of people don't understand what the stuff in google analytics means. You do, and you can use it to see the health of your website and understand your customers.
    • SEO: Not only did you show basic SEO skills like link building and keyword research - but when you choose keyword research, you are BRANDING your business, because you are choosing how you brand it on the search engines since with SEO you usually are limited in how many keywords per page you can get away with. You had to choose carefully.
    • Copywriting: Not only did you show excellent writing skills and wrote it for conversions, you engaged in REPUTATION MANAGEMENT because you are carefully managing what image you send to the public with what you choose to write.

    Didn't make any money? That's OK. DON'T tell them that! Black Hat Tip: LIE LIE LIE.

    For these skills, I could apply for lots of jobs. Here are some:

    • SEO Consultant
    • Adwords Consultant
    • Online Marketing Consultant
    • General Business Marketing Jobs (you won't just being marketing online. But you can transfer your skills)
    • Copywriter
    • Social Media Consultant/Marketer
    • Jobs in Advertising
    • Web Developer (not based on my skills, but many of you will be able to do this)
    • Marketing Manager for a Small Business
    • Assistant Marketer (you'll be a personal assistant, and you'll be given other marketing jobs, like managing online advertising portfolios)
    • Jobs in Sales (if you possess people skills, you can transfer your skills)
    • Advertising Sales (large websites sell advertising. You help them sell their advertising - like affiliate managers)
    • Customer Service Representatives
    • General office jobs, and secretary jobs
    • Jobs in PR/Reputation Management (good copywriting skills are important here; you can transfer your ability to create online reputation for your own businesses and transfer that to their clients. You will also need good interpersonal skills here)
    PRO TIP: For the anti-social of us, I suggest you get interpersonal skills as that will be vital in part 2. But for now, jobs that require less social skills out of what I listed include SEO consultant, Adwords Manager, Online Advertising Manager/Sales [you only email clients usually] and Web Developer.​

    Step 2: Finding ALL of the Jobs

    Finding the right job isn't as hard as you might think! There are four major ways to find jobs. They are as follows:

    • Find them ONLINE. Find websites that list jobs, and read ALL of them. Keep in mind; there could, and often will be, hundreds of people applying for one job (IMPORTANT: Don't let this intimidate you, I will tell you why later)
    • Find them through FRIENDS. Ask your friends, ask your church members, ask your family members, ask everyone you know if they know of any marketing jobs, and ask them to ask everyone that they know if they have any marketing jobs. 60% of jobs are not listed, and are hired internally. This is why networking is so important.
    • Go to recruitment agencies. Sometimes, recruitment agencies will list jobs online too. Even if they do, ring up and put in your details and ask for more information on other jobs and upcoming jobs. This is FREE. Keep in mind, they want YOU because they are paid thousands of dollars to find new employees for a company.
    • Cold-call businesses. I suggest this as a last resort. Handing in your CV just doesn't work in my experience; they forget they have it. Spend your time making friends and networking.

    HOW I DID IT: I found my jobs online. I went onto a major jobs website, and found two jobs that I liked. They had 50-100 people apply for each one. In one of the jobs, they already had someone they were on the verge of hiring. But they liked my CV so much... they called me in for an interview! Not even kidding. The reason they called me in was because my CV was amazing, but that is for part 2.

    Step 3: Picking The Right Job

    When finding jobs, it is not just about finding A job - its about finding the RIGHT job. When browsing through listings and researching the businesses, consider these factors:

    • How social do you need to be? Who will you be working with in your job? What is your position relative to these people? What are their ages? What is the likely social environment (are they "hip" and "cool"? If so, heavy socializing will be expected. Mom and Pop small business? Not the case)
    • Where is it? If you don't have a car; how many forms of public transportation will you need? How long is the commute, with waiting-around times included? Consider whether or not this is worth it, honestly. A long, hard, expensive commute is likely to make you very depressed and hate your job, especially if you aren't an early riser.
    • Are the hours flexible? Can you work at home? Can you work odd hours? Can you come in earlier to leave earlier?
    • Are you expected to achieve certain goals in your job? Having pressure to make sales and conversions will be very stressful. On the other hand, if you will be given tasks to do from a manager, it will be THEIR prerogative to make the sales, NOT you, lowering your stress levels. Some people like the stress; most don't. Take a lower, less-paid job if you won't like this, you will thank yourself later.

    This is usually MORE IMPORTANT than what you will be doing. If you are doing a "fun" job, it won't be fun if these factors aren't adding up and you'll be depressed because you'll have a poor work/life balance. On the other hand, if you're doing a "meh" job, you'll be still balanced, just not inspired. You can find ways to make it more fun, but you can't fix these things.

    Thanks for reading part 1! PART 2 Can be found here.
     
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    Last edited: Jul 11, 2012
  2. ibyrne

    ibyrne Newbie

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    Thanked.

    I am entering my last year of college so I am all for any kind of tips anyone can provide about getting a 'real' job after graduation. I will be following this thread :)
     
  3. Windmill

    Windmill Supreme Member

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    Well I don't know if people will respond much. My guess is most people on here aren't looking to get a job :) but you should read part 2 and, when I can get around to it, part 3. Part 2 and part 3 are the most important... its how you GET the job!
     
  4. bigkapp

    bigkapp Regular Member

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    Extremely informative post Windmill , I really needed something like this . I don't like admitting things like this but for some reason I get intimidated by employers . You basically walked me through the whole proses script and all . Thanks
     
  5. Windmill

    Windmill Supreme Member

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    Hi there! No problem :) I understand. Most people are very intimidated and overwhelmed with getting jobs and dealing with employers. Its nothing to be scared about though, you just need to know what you are good at.... and you could very well know more than you realise :)