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Google is starting to accept requests from Europeans who want to erase unflattering info

Discussion in 'Black Hat SEO' started by fxphil, May 30, 2014.

  1. fxphil

    fxphil Senior Member

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    Google is starting to accept requests from Europeans who want to erase unflattering information from the results produced by the world's dominant search engine. The demands can be submitted on a Web page that Google opened late Thursday in response to a landmark ruling issued two weeks ago by Europe's highest court.
    The decision gives Europeans the means to polish their online reputations by petitioning Google and other search engines to remove potentially damaging links to newspaper articles and other websites with embarrassing information about their past activities.

    Google's compliance thrusts the company into the prickly position of having to balance privacy concerns and "the right to be forgotten" against the principles of free expression and "the right to know."


    It will also create a divide between how Google generates search results about some people in Europe and the rest of the world. For now at least, Google will only scrub personal information spanning a 32-nation swath in Europe. That means Googling the same person in the United States and dozens of other countries could look much different than it does from Europe.


    http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory/google-taking-requests-censor-results-europe-23922152

    Been waiting for this as G does not like ppl profiting from reputation management firms.
     
  2. ficfroc

    ficfroc Regular Member

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    I beleive this concerns only individuals. REputation management still has a lot of companies willing to use their services.
     
  3. wi11iam

    wi11iam Junior Member

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    Yeah, I saw this in the news a week or so ago. Seems like a few people have already submitted requests! This could cause all sorts of problems for Google. According the BBC almost half of the requests were made from convicted criminals!!

    http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-27631001
     
  4. meln

    meln Junior Member Premium Member

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    So they (understandably) need to verify the request through photo ID etc. I wonder how much manpower this would require when word starts getting out and it becomes something everyone wants to do before applying for a job or whatever.
     
  5. fxphil

    fxphil Senior Member

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    This raises another good point. Where is this information being saved to. Also now G will have even more information and can now tie usernames and records to physical verified photo ID's. Well at least all the convicts of Europe will be logged in one database. Good Idea in theory but I think there maybe a GOV contract behind it for more data mining.

     
  6. fxphil

    fxphil Senior Member

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    In the USA companies/entities have nearly as many rights as people. Believe me when this surfaces here companies HR reps will be lined up at the door.

     
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  7. meinewelt

    meinewelt Junior Member

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    I am german tho not living in germany anymore, and I can vouch ++100 that this is 100% true, and is for everybody no matter if famous person, private person or company.

    PLUS!! the biggest european media companies (like axel springer). AND many HUGE politicians (like sigmar gabriel of the SPD in germany) are also going against google currently too.