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good business books to read?

Discussion in 'BlackHat Lounge' started by Bartman, Jan 19, 2012.

  1. Bartman

    Bartman Power Member

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    all the successful business people that I see have one thing in common: they dont know shit about their business, but they are good LEADERS. they have good teams of people that know what they are doing, and the business owner just manages or leads them
    Me: I spend a lot of time doing all the dirty work myself because i am too cheap to hire someone. And I dont know how to lead.
    Do you have any idea what I mean? it's kind of hard to describe. What I mean is: all the successful business owners, they JUST MANAGE a team that helps them to succeed. they dont know shit. they may, but dont have to. I think knowledge and knowing how to do things is not important in business. this is something i realized recently.
    Does anyone know a book that I could read that would help me become more efficient at business?
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2012
  2. cybergold

    cybergold Newbie

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    Do more, read less.
    My 5 cents. Biographies are the most fun to read and show you a lot, however, it is always uncertain how the past can be properly applied to the present.

    Also, do you have the charisma of a Steve Jobs, the financial savvy of a Warren Buffet ? After all, it is YOU not them who is trying to create YOUR business.

    I always hated the people who "managed". If you cannot do it yourself you will be a poor manager. You do not know what the problem is and how to solve it. Respected leaders know the ugly details. Bill Gates could code, Jobs knows the market and marketing...

    Finally, I read that there is a statistical relation between income and drinking. The more you drink with friends, the greater your network. So instead of burying yourself in a book, maybe gulp down a few cold ones.
     
  3. gmjames

    gmjames Junior Member

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    I recently read a biography on Jack Welch (former chairman of GE), it was good. There are a lot of good books you can read about business and management, but you have to actually apply what you learn to your current business/personal income strategies to truly benefit from reading them.
     
  4. Bartman

    Bartman Power Member

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    ok but like, let's say...steve jobs. do you think he designed the iphone himself? no, he hired brilliant engineers and designers and he just led them. I bet he didnt know shit about the inner workings of ipods or iphones.
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2012
  5. gmjames

    gmjames Junior Member

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    All of the people you mentioned own their own companies (or did) and control them very well because they are good managers. If you can't manage people you can't run a company.
     
  6. hochelaga

    hochelaga Newbie

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    E-myth (Michael E. Gerber) revisited is a great business book. Ten bucks on amazon or free at the library.

    Personally I hate the writing/story telling style of the author but the message is loud and clear.

    Every time he talked about himself I just wanted to club him, but when he talked about other businesses and how they developed sequential systems for doing things I wanted to read more.

    Read that book, understand the impact of a good system, write out your own system and then bite the bullet and pay someone to implement it (or at least to implement the tedious stuff you don't enjoy). I've enjoyed a reasonable degree of success lately getting outsourcers at really good rates from easyoutsource.com

    There's no membership fee there so you only pay your workers. I just do two day trials with people and give them a list of more things than they can possibly do in two days. That lets me see how fast they can work, then I pick the best ones and give them more stuff to do for two weeks. If they keep it up then they have a full time job.

    They do of course have affilate links on their site so if you want to give back after you find a good worker, but something through them.

    That's the message though - systems. Set up, implement, evaluate, refine, rinse, repeat.

    It's certainly not dry like a text book, but you'll get the idea. It's one of those ideas where afterwards you might ask people who have read it what they think about it and you can know that if they read it and didn't implement any systems, they didn't understand a damn thing, even though they'll think they do.
     
  7. SpeakToTman

    SpeakToTman Regular Member

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    Dude I understand exactly what you talking about, but its actually all common knowledge already. If you do any kind of business studies, it's clearly laid out that the higher up you go in the corporate ladder, the more conceptual and holistic skills you need. The lower down you are the more technical your skills need to be. That's why it's always hard for someone at the bottom of the food chain to work their way to the top of the business and be placed in management roles. It's because their skills are technical skills - and as they move up they have to adapt and learn to take a more holistic view of things.

    As for good business books, if you want something REALLY inspiring read Jordan Belford's Wolf of wall street and Catching the wolf of wall street. For some great advice and tips on handling your money as you make it read Robert Kiyosaki's Rich Dad Poor Dad
     
  8. bookbuster

    bookbuster Newbie

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    Rich Dad Poor Dad
     
  9. joaquin112

    joaquin112 Regular Member

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    Well you touched a very important subject there. Very few people can actually become rich by themselves. The sooner you start to hire people to work for you, the faster you will grow and acquire more money. You can't really do everything by yourself, nor should you try...
     
  10. AGSniper

    AGSniper Regular Member

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    While he wasn't familiar with the engineering of the devices, he DID essentially design the iphone and the products with his simplicity and design sense. He hired people who THOUGHT like him so it was less work on him. When Jobs found Ivy, they got along so well because they were so perfect in the sense they agreed on design, so it was less for Jobs to worry about.

    Jobs also always did the operations by himself, but it was less work when he hired Cook to be the COO because he had the same philosophy has him. He had a brilliant sense of design, and you can see it in the effort he went through to get the perfect materials for the iPhone and etc.

    It's not 100% true to say leaders don't know anything about the inner workings. The best leaders know the inner workings, and put his ideas into all the workers like how Jobs wanted perfection in design, engineering, etc.

    Bill Gates how the code worked, and he put his idea on how softwares should be coded into the company, HP did the same, etc.

    If you want to run a successful company, you have to know the product and what's going on. This concept applies in marketing where you can't just hire an SEO expert without knowing how to do SEO. Sure, it might work, but it's easier to see what's going on fix things because you know how SEO works and you've done it before with success.