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Does Google penalize sites for terrible grammar?

Discussion in 'Black Hat SEO' started by ButcherPete, Dec 13, 2012.

  1. ButcherPete

    ButcherPete Regular Member

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    Occupation:
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    So I am doing this method here for SEO on my main site:

    I'm at the part where you make several Web 2.0 sites that link to your money site. I wrote a few articles and made them into Web 2.0s, but I've been very pressed for time lately, so I just bought some articles from a cheap article service. They came back with some wonky grammar; obviously written by someone who does not speak English as a first language (eh, you get what you pay for.)

    Now I was only going to use these articles for the purpose of making a backlink to my money site. Do you think Google would penalize those sites, and subsequently carry the penalty "upstream" to my money site if I used the articles anyway? I mean, they're not article spinner garbage; the person who wrote them is at least somewhat familiar with the subject matter. It's just that their grasp of the English language was not the greatest. But hell, I've seen things written by native-born Americans with worse grammar than that.

    Should I go through and correct this grammar, or just use them as-is and not worry about it?
     
  2. GiorgioB

    GiorgioB Supreme Member

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    I think google penalises bad grammar on your main site.. if its in an article that just has a link to your site.. my guess is that it should be OK. Just correct any spelling mistakes in the main keywords and keywor related words in the article, since google will care about those.
     
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