Dispute with Sartre (Jacob Swift) Lambdainvestment

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Was there no contract/service agreement in place for this deal? I feel like anything that's over $5k kinda warrants one, no matter the service. Even with those you already trust, you'd still need to get them to fill out a W9, get their business's EIN/VAT for tax purposes, etc. Becomes significantly harder for them to exit scam when you have this sort of information on hand.
 
Was there no contract/service agreement in place for this deal? I feel like anything that's over $5k kinda warrants one, no matter the service. Even with those you already trust, you'd still need to get them to fill out a W9, get their business's EIN/VAT for tax purposes, etc. Becomes significantly harder for them to exit scam when you have this sort of information on hand.
His knowledge blinded people into thinking that he is the most trusted guy and that there was no way he could scam. This was the reason that none of the buyers preferred to ask for an invoice or proof whatsoever.
 
These are my 3 possible theories :

1. : Something very bad happened to him (died/kidnapped/extorted by terrorists)

2. : He performed a hasty and sloppy exit scam and the info we have on him is correct and he is indeed the person we believe him to be.

3. : This is a long-con and he is using multiple faked personalities, social media profiles and persona's to trick people. Also having left tactical "breadcrumbs" for people to find already a year ago on the internet. I can't go too much into what I've found but if this is the case then this is indeed a high level scam that involves basically 'hijacking' (not sure what word to use?) multiple identities of real people. If this is the case it's probably not one person but a team of people.

There are a few ways to know for certain if it's number 3.


I wasn't scammed in any way but did have a decent amount of contact with sartre throughout the past year. I'm mostly curious about this case because it would change my perspective of BHW and make me even more suspicious of people I havn't met in real life.

Tip for everyone : If you are doing business for large sums of money insist to meet/shake hands. If you are in europe you can fly anywhere else in europe for 100 euros. If you are already dropping 10k+ what's a plane ticket and a few nights in an airbnb?
 
I also engaged in a collaboration with Sartre for a project valued at 5,000 USD. Despite extensive delays, he eventually delivered the job on February 12th, after a prolonged back-and-forth spanning 2-3 months. Regrettably, the quality of his work fell far below expectations. I must take responsibility for this outcome as I pressured him to rush through the task, and currently, I am too overwhelmed with other responsibilities to pursue minor issues. Consequently, I decided not to request a refund.

The generated articles were problematic on multiple levels. Some were not even in English, while others consisted of spun, outdated content that lacked originality and coherence. There is no need to delve into the issues of plagiarism or fluency in the content.

This experience serves as a reminder of the old saying: "If something appears too good to be true, it probably is."

Some reference: https://prnt.sc/nojhhXTM9soo
 
These are my 3 possible theories :

1. : Something very bad happened to him (died/kidnapped/extorted by terrorists)

2. : He performed a hasty and sloppy exit scam and the info we have on him is correct and he is indeed the person we believe him to be.

3. : This is a long-con and he is using multiple faked personalities, social media profiles and persona's to trick people. Also having left tactical "breadcrumbs" for people to find already a year ago on the internet. I can't go too much into what I've found but if this is the case then this is indeed a high level scam that involves basically 'hijacking' (not sure what word to use?) multiple identities of real people. If this is the case it's probably not one person but a team of people.

There are a few ways to know for certain if it's number 3.


I wasn't scammed in any way but did have a decent amount of contact with sartre throughout the past year. I'm mostly curious about this case because it would change my perspective of BHW and make me even more suspicious of people I havn't met in real life.

Tip for everyone : If you are doing business for large sums of money insist to meet/shake hands. If you are in europe you can fly anywhere else in europe for 100 euros. If you are already dropping 10k+ what's a plane ticket and a few nights in an airbnb?

That's not practical. You can't meet and shake hands with everyone. Especially not over amounts like $10k. That's not a large amount of money anyway. An international return flight is going to be 20-25% that, then hotels another 10%.

It's simple.. Just don't do weird business with random people.

Do business with companies through traditional means like banks/stripe/paypal.

When someone's going to pay me I don't just have them send a sneaky crypto payment. I send them an invoice from my C corporation and they either pay via their card through my stripe account, paypal or wire to my US bank.

If I scammed anyone for any large amounts of money I am visible and connected. They have an invoice from a C corp, to a US bank. You have a legal route.

Sending crypto to a guy who you don't even know if they exist has no protection.

Don't send large amounts of crypto to people unless you've done business with them for a long time, or they're so visible that you know they're legit.

Don't send wires to random countries around the world. If you're dealing with large amounts of money and the person doesn't have a presence in the US, then don't do business. You won't find any legit US companies that are scamming like this. And having an "LLC", then taking a crypto, or a payment to an offshore bank somewhere is not safe either. For the LLC to be legit, you should be sending a US wire to a US account in the name of the LLC. If not, it's just made up.

Try finding "LambdaInvestments.com LLC". I can't find anything on it. If you actually paid $13k to a US account with the name LambdaInvestments.com LLC then you'd be able to get a lawyer and get the money back. The US corporate veil only protects you if you're above the law. If you're scamming, then it disappears.

It can be a UK or European company too, but everyone doing business with large sums on the internet should have a US account. We are dealing with USD and it's the central place of all digital business. But even for the UK, you can do a check on a company, and you'd be sending money to a UK account to the name of the Ltd company. scammers are not going have setups like that. They'll just ask for crypto or payment to a shady offshore jurisdiction. It's easy to spot, folks.

Yes it's still possible to run into trouble even with the above, but it's VERY rare and the only way someone's going to be able to fake the above is if they go to the effort of using fake IDs.
 
I would like to hope that @Sartre comes back & handles this. That’s the part of my brain responsible for wishful thinking. Like when you’ve put in very little work in attempts at ranking for a competitive niche.


The logical part of myself understands that this was a long con and I’m sorry for those of you who were had.

Hats off to @BassTrackerBoats for handling this.

I don't think dear sir. because I see he saying "Don't tell anyone" in that chat screenshot. After see that now I also think he's never come back.

That's not practical. You can't meet and shake hands with everyone. Especially not over amounts like $10k. That's not a large amount of money anyway. An international return flight is going to be 20-25% that, then hotels another 10%.

It's simple.. Just don't do weird business with random people.

Do business with companies through traditional means like banks/stripe/paypal.

When someone's going to pay me I don't just have them send a sneaky crypto payment. I send them an invoice from my C corporation and they either pay via their card through my stripe account, paypal or wire to my US bank.

If I scammed anyone for any large amounts of money I am visible and connected. They have an invoice from a C corp, to a US bank. You have a legal route.

Sending crypto to a guy who you don't even know if they exist has no protection.

Don't send large amounts of crypto to people unless you've done business with them for a long time, or they're so visible that you know they're legit.

Don't send wires to random countries around the world. If you're dealing with large amounts of money and the person doesn't have a presence in the US, then don't do business. You won't find any legit US companies that are scamming like this. And having an "LLC", then taking a crypto, or a payment to an offshore bank somewhere is not safe either. For the LLC to be legit, you should be sending a US wire to a US account in the name of the LLC. If not, it's just made up.

Try finding "LambdaInvestments.com LLC". I can't find anything on it. If you actually paid $13k to a US account with the name LambdaInvestments.com LLC then you'd be able to get a lawyer and get the money back. The US corporate veil only protects you if you're above the law. If you're scamming, then it disappears.

It can be a UK or European company too, but everyone doing business with large sums on the internet should have a US account. We are dealing with USD and it's the central place of all digital business. But even for the UK, you can do a check on a company, and you'd be sending money to a UK account to the name of the Ltd company. scammers are not going have setups like that. They'll just ask for crypto or payment to a shady offshore jurisdiction. It's easy to spot, folks.

Yes it's still possible to run into trouble even with the above, but it's VERY rare and the only way someone's going to be able to fake the above is if they go to the effort of using fake IDs.

Words!! <3
 
I'm pretty sure he is a scammer. If he's a legit guy, he would have created a new account and contacted BHW, explaining the issues associated with his old account.

BHW moderators would have easily approved his new account.

But still, there's one possibility. His account would have been hacked, and he would have had some personal issues at the same time. But the chances are very low for that to happen.

If he's really a scammer, we should really appreciate his intelligence level. This is how a scam should be staged.
 
Was there no contract/service agreement in place for this deal? I feel like anything that's over $5k kinda warrants one, no matter the service. Even with those you already trust, you'd still need to get them to fill out a W9, get their business's EIN/VAT for tax purposes, etc. Becomes significantly harder for them to exit scam when you have this sort of information on hand.

A contract is private and remains private. Getting a W9 is only applicable to US PERSONS who wish to contract with the IRS aka INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE to be liable for "federal income tax". Nobody is obligated to contract with a third party to perform services or provide products to people, and when "crypto" is the valuable consideration, the state has zero jurisdiction over the matter. The point being that requesting this info is not going to solve an issue of non-performance, and that a contract would have been required from the outset where both parties agree to resolve their disputes in some court or by arbitration.
 
That's not practical. You can't meet and shake hands with everyone. Especially not over amounts like $10k. That's not a large amount of money anyway. An international return flight is going to be 20-25% that, then hotels another 10%.

It's simple.. Just don't do weird business with random people.

Do business with companies through traditional means like banks/stripe/paypal.

When someone's going to pay me I don't just have them send a sneaky crypto payment. I send them an invoice from my C corporation and they either pay via their card through my stripe account, paypal or wire to my US bank.

If I scammed anyone for any large amounts of money I am visible and connected. They have an invoice from a C corp, to a US bank. You have a legal route.

Sending crypto to a guy who you don't even know if they exist has no protection.

Don't send large amounts of crypto to people unless you've done business with them for a long time, or they're so visible that you know they're legit.

Don't send wires to random countries around the world. If you're dealing with large amounts of money and the person doesn't have a presence in the US, then don't do business. You won't find any legit US companies that are scamming like this. And having an "LLC", then taking a crypto, or a payment to an offshore bank somewhere is not safe either. For the LLC to be legit, you should be sending a US wire to a US account in the name of the LLC. If not, it's just made up.

Try finding "LambdaInvestments.com LLC". I can't find anything on it. If you actually paid $13k to a US account with the name LambdaInvestments.com LLC then you'd be able to get a lawyer and get the money back. The US corporate veil only protects you if you're above the law. If you're scamming, then it disappears.

It can be a UK or European company too, but everyone doing business with large sums on the internet should have a US account. We are dealing with USD and it's the central place of all digital business. But even for the UK, you can do a check on a company, and you'd be sending money to a UK account to the name of the Ltd company. scammers are not going have setups like that. They'll just ask for crypto or payment to a shady offshore jurisdiction. It's easy to spot, folks.

Yes it's still possible to run into trouble even with the above, but it's VERY rare and the only way someone's going to be able to fake the above is if they go to the effort of using fake IDs.
Agree with what you say, although $10k 'IS' a large amount of money to most people. There is always going to be scammers, so marketplaces like BHW should adapt to the times and add more layers of approval to services - for one, a face to face zoom should be mandatory to identify the responsible person behind the service (if it doesnt already). In my previous career, i worked as an acquisitions manager for a Realestate investment marketplace that brought together property suppliers and investors from around the world. Larger sums of money went directly through the marketplace without a single scam (lots of attempts) due to the layers of checks a supplier had to go through first (there was no hiding). No point saying its not practical, its actually critical as trusting the marketplace approval process was a critical factor in the growth of investors using the platform.
 
I don't understand why people lose their basic logic when presented with offers like that. If someone's system can make you thousands of dollars, why would they sell it? Why wouldn't they use it for their own projects if it is indeed that good?

His system turned out to be rubbish. I'm exploring automated websites myself, and surprisingly, the programming aspect is the simplest part. It's especially easy when you can ask ChatGPT to write the code for you. The main challenge lies in persuading Google to 'like' your website / content and rank it highly in search results.
 
Look, at the end of the day, the one thing people should get is “DON'T HAND OVER MONEY YOU CAN'T AFFORD TO LOSE, TO ANYONE, WITHOUT CARRYING OUT PROPER DUE DILIGENCE”

We have seen this very same scam so many times on BHW. Promises of easy money, without any work, due to automated systems. BIG RED FLAG. People get greedy and lose all common sense.

I am uncertain whether he originally meant to scam, possibly he was over ambitious and his system just didn't work, and he scarpered because he couldn't refund.
 
It definitely is. 650M monthly visitors on a $13 server? Shut up and take my money Sir.
Oops I did misread the numbers to be visitors instead of page views. The point remains the same though.
 
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