1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Could Your Font Choice Be Losing You 88% Of Your Business?

Discussion in 'Making Money' started by CEPI, Apr 10, 2012.

  1. CEPI

    CEPI Power Member

    Joined:
    May 15, 2009
    Messages:
    502
    Likes Received:
    1,922
    Occupation:
    Business Turn Around & Management Consultant
    Location:
    Cosmos
    Found this little excerpt interesting. It can be found in the book "Cashvertising" which you can do a simple BHW search for and download. I pulled this little part out as a quick tip:
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Multiple researchers confirm that serif fonts make words easier to read. (Wordon, 1991; Hartley, 1994). Examples of serif fonts are Times New Roman, Palatino, Schoolbook, Georgia, Courier, Cheltenham, Bookman, and Garamond.

    In 1926, The British Medical Council reported that sans serif type causes irradiation: an optical anomaly in which space between lines intruded into letters, creating a type of light-vibration that made reading more difficult and uncomfortable.

    In a study of comprehension, Wheildon (1986) noted that only 12 percent of participants effectively comprehended a passage set in sans serif type, versus 67 percent of readers given a version set in a serif typeface. Those given the sans serif version said they had a tough time reading the text and had to ?continually back-track to regain comprehension.?

    In a substantial test of apprx 1 million readers, Wheildon set one ad in three different faces: Garamond, Times Roman (both serif), and Helvetica (sans serif). Here?s what he found:

    ✸ Garamond was read and comprehended by 670,000 people?66 percent of the test subjects.
    ✸ Times Roman was comprehended by 320,000?less than half of Garamond.
    ✸ Helvetica was comprehended by only 120,000 people? 12.5 percent of the subjects.

    Bottom line: Serif fonts?at least on paper?are simply easier to read. The findings are the same for virtually every researcher who?s ever conducted the test. No wonder most newspaper and magazine publishers set their body copy in a serif typeface.


    • Advertising copy great John Caples liked using Cheltenham Bold for headlines.
    • David Ogilvy preferred the Century family, Caslon, Baskerville, and Jenson.
    • Direct marketing guru Gary Halbert swore by Courier for sales letters.

    Ascender Corporation?s study ?Fonts on the Front Page? revealed the 10 most popular typefaces used by the top 100 U.S newspapers (by circulation), in order:

    1. Poynter Series.
    2. Franklin Gothic.
    3. Helvetica.
    4. Utopia.
    5. Times.
    6. Nimrod.
    7. Century Old Style.
    8. Interstate.
    9. Bureau Grotesque.
    10. Miller.

    Until research says otherwise, using any of the serif fonts suggested here will not only put you in good company, but will also help you create attractive, more readable sales materials.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 3
  2. crepito

    crepito Junior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2008
    Messages:
    145
    Likes Received:
    28
    Location:
    Portugal
    Nice tips
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  3. The_Clarkey

    The_Clarkey Junior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2011
    Messages:
    127
    Likes Received:
    24
    Here is another to improve conversions. Use the colors Google uses on it's search engine. The blue underline and green, they're the most widely recognized colors.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  4. Techxan

    Techxan Elite Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2011
    Messages:
    3,093
    Likes Received:
    3,585
    Occupation:
    Local SEOist
    Location:
    TEXAS (you have to yell, its the law.)
    What serif fonts are typically found in most browsers?
     
  5. hawke

    hawke Power Member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2008
    Messages:
    644
    Likes Received:
    533
    Location:
    Ohio
    Helvetica fonts are always a golden choice... anything thin, is "IN" so to speak :)
     
  6. CEPI

    CEPI Power Member

    Joined:
    May 15, 2009
    Messages:
    502
    Likes Received:
    1,922
    Occupation:
    Business Turn Around & Management Consultant
    Location:
    Cosmos
    Times New Roman, and see others listed above in the part I wrote. Each browser may be different.
     
  7. CEPI

    CEPI Power Member

    Joined:
    May 15, 2009
    Messages:
    502
    Likes Received:
    1,922
    Occupation:
    Business Turn Around & Management Consultant
    Location:
    Cosmos
    Helvetica had a 12.5% comprehension rate. Not sure I would go with what's "IN" rather what would be read and understood. ;)
     
  8. codo3500

    codo3500 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2010
    Messages:
    335
    Likes Received:
    169
    With Helvetica being pushed so commonly used now (and being so similar to Arial, which is ofcourse even more common) I find it hard to believe this would still be the case.

    Comprehension ability comes from experience, and the more you look at something, the more comfortable with it you become. I believe due to it's heavy use on the web, arial/helvetica would be the most readable and easy to comprehend.
     
  9. hawke

    hawke Power Member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2008
    Messages:
    644
    Likes Received:
    533
    Location:
    Ohio
    well, I'm not ditching my Helvetica fonts anytime soon sooooo, yeah lol
     
  10. CEPI

    CEPI Power Member

    Joined:
    May 15, 2009
    Messages:
    502
    Likes Received:
    1,922
    Occupation:
    Business Turn Around & Management Consultant
    Location:
    Cosmos
    OK i'm only quoting a study done with one million people, but all of your guys' assumptions that are unscientific are clearly correct. Sorry for the suggestion copy stars USA! You better get back to writing your next Super Bowl advert and not messing with idiots like three of the top ad execs in history.

    :hand:
     
  11. hawke

    hawke Power Member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2008
    Messages:
    644
    Likes Received:
    533
    Location:
    Ohio
    Not to mention this study was done in 1984.... times change and so do peoples mentality and thought process... :p
     
  12. 3v0|v3

    3v0|v3 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2011
    Messages:
    224
    Likes Received:
    165
    Location:
    Alabama
    What font would BHW suggest. I have not thought about this in marketing, but it makes sense.
     
  13. Techxan

    Techxan Elite Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2011
    Messages:
    3,093
    Likes Received:
    3,585
    Occupation:
    Local SEOist
    Location:
    TEXAS (you have to yell, its the law.)
    It turns out that the words "printed page" are the key here. I have been researching this with regard to websites, because all I have ever heard was stay away from serif's on a web page.

    The problem has to do with screen resolution. If your monitor has adequate resolution, the serifs on the letters will help the visitor. But if your monitor has inadequate resolution, the serifs will not display correctly, or may be distorted.

    Since most people have average monitors, and many have netbooks, phones, and pads, today it is better to use san-serif fonts on websites.

    It would make sense to me though, that if you were using a large font for a title or something, the serifs would be easy to display so using serifs in headlines may be a really good idea.
     
  14. ben10023

    ben10023 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2011
    Messages:
    294
    Likes Received:
    62
    Location:
    UK
    Home Page:
    I worked for Ogilvy for a bit.. cool company!
     
  15. moonlighsunligh

    moonlighsunligh Jr. VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2010
    Messages:
    1,623
    Likes Received:
    218
    Which font to choose depends if you want to send people to affiliate sites as quicly as posible or you want them to read your content. So it depends of your content quality.