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can you put BBB image on your website even though you are not a member?

Discussion in 'BlackHat Lounge' started by theseodude, Jan 5, 2013.

  1. theseodude

    theseodude Regular Member

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    it seems that people who see the BBB logo will trust you more.
    can I go to google images and get a BBB logo and put it in my site, or would that get me in trouble?
     
  2. steelballs

    steelballs BANNED BANNED

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    Dude shortcuts like that are frowned upon here in BHW...

    By doing that - WHO IS GOING TO TRUST YOU!:eek:
     
  3. huser21

    huser21 Regular Member

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    BBB does not allow their logo on your site unless you have an A+ rating with them-the only way to get an A+ rating from them includes paying them $500. The BBB is a joke if you really want something along these lines use Angie's list.
     
  4. theseodude

    theseodude Regular Member

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    I agree that bbb is a joke, but it seems to me that people who see their logo on your site are more likely to trust you, which means more clients and more money.
     
  5. huser21

    huser21 Regular Member

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    I often do get asked in my 9-5 if I am a member of BBB (which I used to be). I explain to them that I no longer am a member, by choice, and then explain why. The BBB doesnt have the influence that they used to have and because of this they go out of their way to try and stay profitable. Case in point-just for signing up with them (which costs) you will receive an A- rating and some very old school marketing products (decals,literature, a plaque after 12 months, etc.) You will have it explained to you VERY clearly that you cannot use their logo on your website w/o an A+ rating. Guess how you get that rating? Yep, you pay them. The only way to get it. Not good service, not a longstanding member but $500. Im ranting on this for 2 reasons:

    1. Explaining this to any potential customers makes the BBB or lack there of a very easy sell and
    2.If you put that logo on your site w/o having paid the BBB their asking price (and lets be honest the only reason we want to be associated with them is to use their logo on our sites) and just one customer or potential customer contacts the BBB to check on you, you're caught and you'll look very silly to that customer.

    *By the way, I never had any complaints filed against me as a BBB member so that has nothing to do with my opinion of them.

    Personally, instead of paying them and then being held hostage to them (dont forget exactly what it is they do and how they do it) use Angie's. It has 10x the power of the BBB.
     
  6. SEO_Alchemy

    SEO_Alchemy Senior Member

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    Do you have a problem with using copyrighted images? How about d/l cracked software? What about torrents? Don't give a shit ?! Use it, if you think it will get you sales. All they can do is send you a C&D, and guess what, then you should take it down. Easy as that friend.
     
  7. B. Friendly

    B. Friendly BANNED BANNED

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    That's just too fucking funny. Here at BHW we frown on "shortcuts", lol. Here at BHW we expect you to do things the long and legally correct way, HA HA HA HA HA. I gotta stop, or I'll piss myself.

    I think your information is dated, unless BBB policy varies by region. Several years ago, the ability to use the BBB logo cost extra, beyond the standard membership fee, however the last conversation that I had with the BBB telemarketer is that standard membership allows the legal use of the logo.

    IMO, the BBB is a mixed bag. On the positive side, they give a GREAT backlink; one that Google really stands up and takes notice of. It might make the difference between being #4 in Local Search results, and #1. So, the first question to ask is if the value of the backlink is worth $500. I met a plumber that told me that he made his $500 investment in the BBB in two days.

    On the down-side, I think that once you volunteer for the coercion of having your BBB rating affected by a disgruntled Member of the Public, you open the door to any and every asshole in the world to use the rope you've given them to hang you. In terms of ratings & reviews, I'd rather have a negative Yelp, GP, etc... rating than a BBB. The BBB's negative rating is perceived as REAL, vs. the other local citation's reviews can be done by "just anyone" about "just anything". That's just my opinion about the perception, and in this situation, "reality" is irrelevant.

    As far as the OP's question, about whether or not to use the BBB logo on a website, without paying for it, I would say the answer depends upon the age, size and profitability of the website. If it's older, established and generating good income, you invite problems with the BBB if you use their logo. You have something to lose.

    However, if the business is new, well... If it were me, I'd do it. In fact, I have a few irons in the fire and putting the BBB logo on my website is on the list of things I'm thinking about. I understand the risks, and I wouldn't advocate anyone else do it, nor would I do it to someone else's website (say my own client), but...

    Well. Most people are stupid. They see the logo in passing, and the message is "legit" and they might decide to give you a call. It might mean the difference between a phone call that happens and one that does not. If I get someone that wants to know directly if I'm a member of the BBB, I would dodge the question and defer to my (fictional) "wife", as in "We've talked about it, but I don't know if she actually joined this year or not." leaving open the possibility that we might have been members last year. If someone is that serious about digging around the BBB looking for history, well that's not going to be my client anyways, and here's why.

    I'm honest. I look people in the eye when I talk. I don't play games and do things like hide charges, etc.... And honest people know who I am when we talk. We recognize each other. Dishonest people are most concerned about having someone treat them they way they are capable of treating someone else, meaning that the people most afraid of being scammed are the scammers. And in my line of work, I am much more vulnerable to being scammed than my customers. So, when people start asking for references, etc.... I generally steer clear.

    But note, none of this comes from actually experience. I might (someday) put a BBB logo on my site and wind up in all sorts of trouble (lol). Or I might just pay for the membership. The backlink REALLY is good. It's the best (meaning the most juice) local backlink I've ever found. One idea for someone to try is to do a survey of the local businesses in their niche, and compare those that have BBB backlinks to those that do not, and see where they fall in the local search results on the primary keywords.

    Also, keep in mind that competition in the local search results is niche-specific. If you are the only electrician in town that has a BBB backlink, you might have a guaranteed ticket to #1 with little additional SEO. However, if 9 of the top 10 plumbers in your town have a BBB backlink, failing to get one may mean you'll never make the 1st page. There is no absolute and objective rule. The first thing to do is an analysis of the competition and find out what their off-site SEO is like. Most niches are so weak that and SEO at all is a guaranteed page one and maybe in the top 5. People in the trades are usually one-trick ponies. They can do drywall, but don't know how to turn on a computer. So in many cases there is absolutely no competition at all, and what competition there is is amateurish. Someone hired a guy to do SEO for a week 2 years ago, and they've been coasting along with that ever since. A serious SEO effort can put a local business at #1.

    Hell, I saw a business that made custom-sized window screens, and the ONLY backlink they had was a heavily-spammed forum profile link. You can tell the owner paid someone on a place like WF to do a $15.00 package, and he's been sitting on #1 in my town ever since. As in YEARS.