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Broad Match is your friend! A guide on finding long-tail keywords that convert

Discussion in 'White Hat SEO' started by Smeems, Nov 21, 2012.

  1. Smeems

    Smeems Regular Member

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    Hello all.

    Below is a simple guide on how you can identify converting long-tail keywords for any niche, using our trusty friends: The Google Adwords Keyword Tool and Broad & Exact Match.

    First of all, stop dismissing broad match for keyword research. If used correctly, it can be a very useful tool in identifying keywords. This guide can help you use it in that correct way.

    Consider the following terms:


    • Broad match = Contains all the keywords used in the search, may be in any order, and may include other words
    • Exact match = Contains the keywords and only these words in the order written

    The main reason why broad match is dismissed at initial keyword research (and quite rightly) is that if you're typing hair extensions, for example, and want to get an idea of search volume to for that keyword specifically, broad match will not give you an accurate result.

    However, what about using broad match to identify long-tail keywords that people are actively searching for?

    Let's use the hair extensions niche for the Google UK market as an example.

    [​IMG]

    Quite an active local niche. You can see the large discrepancy between broad and [exact] here, so there's not much to learn. Adwords always provides suggested keywords for to target as well. Let's look at one of them:

    [​IMG]

    Here, we can see an exact match result for [hair extensions uk] coming in at 6,600 results. This could be a good one to target as well, however, it does not necessarily give us a converting long-tail keyword. The broad match terms, which remember is the keyword term typed in, in any order, while also potentially using other words in the search, gives a result of 27,100. What does this tell us? It says that, while people are searching for [hair extensions uk], it is not the majority search query that users are using when looking for this keyword.

    However, looking at Adwords' suggested keywords, we can discover some interesting results:

    [​IMG]

    Now it's important to remember that adwords data isn't exact, but we can see a close number of results between broad and exact match for the term: balmain hair extensions. What does this tell us? Let's look at the definitions again:


    • Broad match = Contains all the keywords used in the search, may be in any order, and may include other words
    • Exact match = Contains the keywords and only these words in the order written

    The 2,900 results for balmain hair extensions in broad search shows the total number of UK monthly searches for that term in any order, which may also include other words as well, ie other keyword searches. Of those 2,900 mixed results, 1,900 of them are searches that are exactly: [balmain hair extensions]. That means that 65.5% of all search terms of this keyword phrase and a few other related terms as well are typed in exactly by users as [balmain hair extensions]. That is to say, when there is a broad match of 2,900 search terms of users looking for balmain hair extensions, 65.5% of them are using the specific term [balmain hair extensions]. This gives us a great keyword and anchor text to focus on.

    This information tells us that the long-tail keyword [balmain hair extensions] is being actively searched for by users and would be a great one to target. Incidentally, if we look at the SERPS for this keyword: https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=hair+extensions&pws=0 - it looks like quite a rankable term.

    There are further examples as well:

    [​IMG]

    Apparently, racoon is a brand (thank fuck!). But, of all the people searching for racoon hair extensions across broad search terms, over 55% are using [racoon hair extensions] specifically. SERPs again look rankable: https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=racoon+hair+extensions&pws=0, although with it being a brand it's a 7 result SERP-page, which could make things more difficult.

    Finally, we have:

    [​IMG]

    Of the 6,600 people searching for halo hair extensions and other related search queries, a whopping 81.8% of them are typing in [halo hair extensions] exactly. This is a great keyword and anchor text to use, as users themselves are using it. A quick glance at the SERPs: https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=halo+hair+extensions+uk&pws=0 also tells us that this is a very, very rankable keyword.

    Next time that you're conducting some long-tail keyword research, think of your old, forgotten pal: Mr Broad Match.
     
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    Last edited: Nov 21, 2012
  2. Smeems

    Smeems Regular Member

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    Fixed some of the image tags. If anyone has anything to add or ask, would love to hear it.
     
  3. himanuzo

    himanuzo Supreme Member

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    Longer tail in keywords are lower searches but more convertion rate in generating sales.
     
  4. Smeems

    Smeems Regular Member

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    Hence why I think they can be very important to target.

    And also, let's face it, they probably require less effort to rank.
     
  5. Dj Co2

    Dj Co2 Elite Member

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    Never thought of researching keywords like this.. +Rep
     
  6. mikeads66

    mikeads66 Junior Member

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    Hmm. Broad matching can also mean that the keyword might have additional words in it. Like "cheap" or "local"...etc.

    This method can be used to try to guesstimate which keywords are matching for broad match, but i wish there was an easier way :(
     
  7. Smeems

    Smeems Regular Member

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    I think you just need to experiment. The beauty of this is that it's completely free and doesn't take much time. Using my halo hair extensions, we already know that over 80% of searches in broad match terms for that keyword are specifically [halo hair extensions]. To find that other 20%, you could just add words in like "cheap" etc to the initial search, look at the difference between broad and exact match and take it from there.
     
  8. BlackSEOBelt

    BlackSEOBelt Regular Member

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    Good post, Smeems, I've been intuitively doing that myself, but I'm sure there are many people who'll find your ideas useful.
    I only wanted to say that now could be the time to really tap into the long-tail, because the SERPs are so unstable.
     
  9. Smeems

    Smeems Regular Member

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    Absolutely, although I tend to aim for multiple keywords on one 'authority' site then single "blast and rank" niche sites.
     
  10. Smeems

    Smeems Regular Member

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    Got a few PMs regarding people not seeing the suggested keywords in this way/in an organised manner. If that's the case, all you need to do is close the browser and/or logout of your adwords account and re-enter. By default, this will make the suggested keywords group together in the order shown above.