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Breach of copyright claims ignite the Twitterverse

Discussion in 'Twitter' started by Diamond Damien, Aug 2, 2015.

  1. Diamond Damien

    Diamond Damien Owner BlackHatWorld Staff Member Jr. VIP

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    How do you use Twitter? For some people, it's an efficient way to keep up with the latest happenings in the lives of friends, families and even public figures. Others see the social portal as a tool to expand and enhance their professional networks. For others still, it's a stage - a platform they can use to entertain others, get their names out there and build their followings. But what about when your pithy, off-the-cuff tweet about something you saw on the way to work or overheard at the gym gets plagiarized by another account? or 500 other accounts?
    For a long time, there wasn't a lot you could do about becoming a victim of plagiarism on Twitter. Sure, you could tweet the offending user to request a deletion or even mobilize your own followers to block and report the account-holder, but beyond that, you were basically helpless. There's a special kind of fury reserved for watching your carefully crafted miniature masterpiece rack up retweets and favorites under another person's name, but that feeling could soon be a thing of the past.

    140 characters (or fewer) of intellectual property
    Los Angeles-based freelance writer Olga Lexell recently went viral, not for her witty tweets but for the way she deals with people who repost them and claim them as their own.
    "I simply explained to Twitter that as a freelance writer I make my living writing jokes (and I use some of my tweets to test out jokes in my other writing). I then explained that as such, the jokes are my intellectual property, and that the users in question did not have my permission to repost them without giving me credit," she wrote in a statement published on her Twitter account. "I also pointed out that most of them were spam accounts that repost tons of other people's jokes every day."

    Hitting the headlines
    Lexell gave more details about the process in an interview with The Verge. Apparently she's filed requests with Twitter to remove copycat accounts' tweets numerous times, and Twitter usually replaces the plagiarized tweets with the text, "This Tweet from [account name] has been withheld in response to a report from the copyright holder." Her approach stayed below the radar until the account @PlagiarismBad, which names and shames Twitter plagiarists, drew attention to the practice on July 25 and ignited a fierce debate among social media users. Major news providers have since picked up the story, including TIME Magazine, BBC News and the Chicago Tribune.
    The Verge explained that although anyone can report copyright infringement via the Twitter Help Center, most requests involve embedded media or links to websites that host illegal content, as opposed to the text of tweets themselves.
    Should Lexell lighten up, or is she setting a great example for independent content creators? Now that her method of dealing with Twitter plagiarism has hit the headlines, do you think these types of requests will become more common?

    BHW - Let us know........
     
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  2. ItsBlinkHere

    ItsBlinkHere Regular Member

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    It don't really pay to try and find people who are reposting your tweets. People who are reporting are most likely bots, so they will not get nearly as much exposure as you. I have a friend who is a standup comedian who posts jokes all the time. Since his tweets are funny he gets a lot of people copying his tweets, he used to report them but he told me it wasn't worth his time.

    As for dealing with this the blackhat way... So friends of mine got mad at a reporter who kept copying other people's article and then linking them to twitter. It had been happening over the last 2-3 years and he never quit. We would file DMCA complaints and he would take that article down and keep on doing it. So, since he was getting most of his traffic from twitter we decided to hit his twitter account "BlackHat Style"! We started reporting his tweets with some of our twitter bots and it wasn't long before his account got deleted.
     
  3. Panther28

    Panther28 Jr. VIP Jr. VIP

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    Damn DD, you get the spamming award for most blackhat posts today :) You been drinking too much coffee or something?
     
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  4. Capo Dei Capi

    Capo Dei Capi BANNED BANNED

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    Its always women that are wannabe celebs that seem to be DMCA trigger happy. She and others like her would benefit more from just ignoring some piracy and actually working.
     
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    Last edited: Aug 4, 2015
  5. pxoxrxn

    pxoxrxn Supreme Member

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    Wow.

    15 characters
     
  6. asap1

    asap1 BANNED BANNED

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    Tell this lady to take several seats. If she was to win this battle it would mess up all of social media and its to many billions at stake for that to happen.

    What would twitter be without retweeting, tumblr without re-posting (or whatever its called), or any other social media network where you repost someones content?
     
  7. Capo Dei Capi

    Capo Dei Capi BANNED BANNED

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    I've come across it so much, the ones that are thinking that they are celebs and great at business are the ones that love to use DMCA. The actual celeb women don't seem to worry so much about piracy since they know already they can't really do anything about it.