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Are Contests a Legit way to promote your product?

Discussion in 'BlackHat Lounge' started by clpride, May 16, 2014.

  1. clpride

    clpride Registered Member

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    Hey guys, I was thinking about using contests for promotional purposes, but I have my doubts as to how effective they are at getting people to actually look at or buy your stuff. Also, it looks like people could give two sh** about a contest these days. On Instagram, I recently saw this game in the app store offering a considerable amount of money ($1000) for getting the top score within 3 months, but people didn't seem too excited about it. Not sure I'd waste any money in this area, however I was wondering if any of you might have some info on this to share.
     
  2. stefyx

    stefyx Newbie

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    Well, in the field I wanna get into there is this website selling makeup and they have "like and share on facebook to participate" contests. Well, they have over 2000 shares on every contest they make (which is a lot, especially for a much smaller country than USA). Its truly amazing, they got 100k likes.
    It can be very powerful I think.
     
  3. LakeForest

    LakeForest Supreme Member

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    It's the idea of activating the userbase and having them essentially work for you instead of continuously finding new users|clients.

    It works very well. If you offer a free product that allows users to express their vanity, like social networks or art, if it taps into addiction like gaming or hobbies, or a product with a high premium, your users will work for you.

    You don't have to waste money, offer what you have in surplus. Analyze the ROI from "free" offers and monetary offers and adjust accordingly.