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Anyone in music business? What should I charge for a music production work?

Discussion in 'Making Money' started by pdoods, Dec 30, 2010.

  1. pdoods

    pdoods Regular Member

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    Making electronic music is my longtime hobby and I can produce songs and beats at average/good level.

    Couple of artists have contacted me asking if I could produce a beat / song for them and they're asking how much do i charge. Well, I don't have a clue.

    How do I actually set a price tag for a music production work? Hourly rate? Flat price? How much?

    I don't want to set it too high to scare off possible future customers nor to go too low as there's always some pretty intense work related on song making.

    Does anyone have any vague idea how this kind of service should be valued?
     
  2. lablinks

    lablinks Senior Member

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    Figure out how many hours it will take you to make the track, multiply it by 1.5, multiply by the hourly rate you are willing to do this for, now you have the minimum of what you should charge for it.
     
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  3. WizGizmo

    WizGizmo Super Moderator Staff Member Premium Member

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    It depends on who you are working for. I create electronic music background tracks for sales videos for a 200-million-dollar-a-year software company in Tampa, Florida. I have a deal with them for $1200 per track. But if you are working for a small company, you won't get that kind of money. I would charge by the track or by the project if I were you.

    Cheers! - "Wiz"
     
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  4. pdoods

    pdoods Regular Member

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    $1200 per track for a background music is very good!

    hmm now that I think of it: years ago I made a deal with a small record label on two single release songs of my own music and they paid me ?300 (around 380 USD) per release which included two songs (a & b side).

    So I guess I could set the starting price around $100 per song for smaller artists if they want me to produce a whole song based on their musical ideas.
     
  5. GreenGoblin

    GreenGoblin BANNED BANNED

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    it all depends bro, throw a track up and let me hear the quality, I mean it all depends on the quality of the production work.
     
  6. pdoods

    pdoods Regular Member

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    sent you a pm :)
     
  7. SEORasta

    SEORasta Senior Member

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    Dependent on the artist and label as well. Electronica music is different then what I work with (Dancehall Reggae) and tracks I do can go for $500 low to about $5,000 or more. Really again depends.....good luck though!
     
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  8. LetsWin

    LetsWin Newbie

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    It depends.

    For new beats, I have seen new producers charge $25 - $500 for a track to upcoming unsigned artists.

    In the industry side, I have seen producers sell beats from $1500 - $7500. With the bigger producers, they can make $25,000 - $250,000+ a track. It really depends on your track record and what the producers brings to the table.

    To determine what to charge you can check to see what budget the artist has. If they have $500, perhaps a 3 song combo, this can be their "demo" if they got signed, or get a buzz online, this become, your "free advertising" because fans might ask - who made that music? The goal is get a many quality musician recording to music. The bigger the budget the bigger the fee. As for film/tv/music/gaming, you want to make sure you are signed to a PRO - SESAC/ASCAP/BMI, so you can collect additional royalties for non-work for hire.
     
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  9. Ambrozooka

    Ambrozooka Newbie

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    Pay close attention to this! It's very good advice. Be certain to retain your publishing royalties and keep a record of it at publishing companies such as these in the even that the track "blows up".

    I had this happen to me for an obscure unsigned artist who was just starting out. I didn't charge him much initially, just about $200 to work with him closely, but I did maintain and register my publishing rights. When the song hit the radio in our area and was in major rotation I was definitely glad I did.

    You don't want to take new independent artists to the cleaners when charging them, but at the same time you don't want to undercut yourself either. It also brings repeat customers which is what you want. Be reasonable but charge what you are worth if that makes sense.

    MAINTAIN PUBLISHING at all costs, and speak with the artist and determine where they are financially etc. Treating an artist fairly on the front end can pay off on the back end if you are lucky.