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Amazon worse then Walmart on workers... (or, why I love being an Internet Marketer)

Discussion in 'BlackHat Lounge' started by Tensegrity, Feb 24, 2014.

  1. Tensegrity

    Tensegrity Jr. VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

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    In a Salon article today, I read about how Amazon.com has become worse than Walmart on its employees. The article's dense, but I recommend reading it to everyone here (especially n00bs who are still on the fence) as the employee workday described is exactly the opposite of being an Internet Marketer.

    I currently make over $10k/mo -- my income has been consistently going up for the past year or so. Here is a typical day for me:

    - wake up whenever the hell I wake up
    - jerk off
    - check some stats
    - read the news
    - watch some TV while I eat
    - go for a jog
    - hit on the pretty barista when I get a cappuccino
    - go to the park
    - have drinks with friends
    - go see a band play or to a party or something cultural
    - come home and do some coding
    - watch another movie
    - blog a bit
    - check some stats
    - fall asleep when I can't keep my eyes open anymore

    Nowhere in that list is a boss.
    Nowhere is there anyone breathing down my neck.
    Nowhere are there any rules about how I am supposed to act.

    Amazon.com and Walmart workers are not allowed to breathe at certain points in their job. Yes, you read that right. They are not allowed to BREATHE when they're not supposed to.

    Here is an excerpt from the Salon article:

    "Amazon's system of employee monitoring is the most oppressive I have ever come across and combines state-of-the-art surveillance technology with the system of "functional foreman," introduced by Frederick Winslow Taylor in the 1890s in the workshops of the Pennsylvania machine-tool industry in the 1890s. In a fine piece of investigative reporting for the London Financial Times, economics correspondent Sarah O'Connor describes how, at Amazon's center at Rugeley, England,
    Amazon tags its employees with personal sat-nav (satellite navigation) computers that tell them the route they must travel to shelve consignments of goods, but also set target times for their warehouse journeys and then measure whether targets are met.

    Machines measured whether the packers were meeting their targets for output per hour and whether the finished packages met their targets for weight and so had been packed "the one best way." But alongside these digital controls there was a team of "functional foremen," overseers in the full nineteenth-century sense of the term,
    watching the employees every second to ensure that there was no "time theft," in the language of Walmart. On the packing lines there were six such foremen, one known in Amazonspeak as a "coworker" and above him five "leads," whose collective task was to make sure that the line kept moving. Workers would be reprimanded for speaking to one another or for pausing to catch their breath (Verschnaufpause) after an especially tough packing job.

    The functional foreman would record how often the packers went to the bathroom and, if they had not gone to the bathroom nearest the line, why not. The student packer also noticed how, in the manner of Jeremy Bentham's nineteenth-century panopticon, the architecture of the depot was geared to make surveillance easier, with a bridge positioned at the end of the workstation where an overseer could stand and look down on his wards. However, the task of the depot managers and supervisors was not simply to fight time theft and keep the line moving but also to find ways of making it move still faster. Sometimes this was done using the classic methods of Scientific Management, but at other times higher targets for output were simply proclaimed by management,
    in the manner of the Soviet workplace during the Stalin era.

    At the Allentown warehouse, Stephen Dallal, a "picker," found that his output targets increased the longer he worked at the warehouse, doubling after six months. "It started with 75 pieces an hour, then 100 pieces an hour. Then 150 pieces an hour. They just got faster and faster." He too was written up for not meeting his targets and was fired.

    At Amazon's depot in Allentown, Pennsylvania, Kate Salasky worked shifts of up to eleven hours a day, mostly spent walking the length and breadth of the warehouse. In March 2011 she received a warning message from her manager, saying that she had been found unproductive during several minutes of her shift, and she was eventually fired. This employee tagging is now in operation at Amazon centers worldwide."

    This is all very important info for an entrepreneur to learn if you are to get anywhere with your business. However, people are not machines. In the future, hopefully, we will replace them with robots in factory settings like these. But for now, I am damn happy I don't work in a place like that.

    Internet Marketing is your ticket out of becoming a slave.

    And, recognizing that there are plenty of Amazon affiliates here, complaining about getting your associates account banned or not getting paid is nothing compared to being the actual worker who fulfills an order at the warehouse.

    You are all on the better side of the coin here!
    Now let's go make some money :D
     
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    Last edited: Feb 25, 2014
  2. OperationStackola

    OperationStackola Newbie

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    Yup man. You got what I want. I'm currently enrolled in college but I only view it as a place to get an education to further myself as a sole businessman. I never want to work for another man
     
  3. shortgigs

    shortgigs Regular Member

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    Time to take in some mentees and teach them your ways @Tensegrity, paying it forward in the universe and such.

    But you are an inspiration, good post.
     
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  4. OperationStackola

    OperationStackola Newbie

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    Hahah hopefully I could get under his wing if he ever wanted to do that..
     
  5. Tensegrity

    Tensegrity Jr. VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

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    It is on the horizon. Alas, as with any product, it takes a bit of preparation. ;)

    But the important thing I wanted to share was this extremely relevant example of how terrible it is to work for someone else.
     
  6. royserpa

    royserpa Jr. VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

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    Well, i found another reason to work my ass off and keep going to that $3k/m goal! :)
     
  7. ArtVandelay

    ArtVandelay Power Member

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    Very well said.
     
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  8. Tensegrity

    Tensegrity Jr. VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

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    The terrible joke that so many people are falling for is thinking their job is providing them "security".
    There is no security in working for anyone else, it's all an illusion.
     
  9. smartalex

    smartalex Jr. VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

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    This is a great post to keep me motivated. Growing up in a third world country, this sort of thing happens in factories all the time. IM has allowed me my freedom and I wouldn't trade it for anything.
     
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  10. Tensegrity

    Tensegrity Jr. VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

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    I can only imagine the horrors of factory workers in other countries. At least with Amazon.com you don't get beaten or raped and get paid a living wage. (Still a shitty company though, don't get me wrong!)