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5 Things to Un-Learn from School.

Discussion in 'BlackHat Lounge' started by Adam718, Jan 8, 2013.

  1. Adam718

    Adam718 Senior Member

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    I came across an interesting article, and thought it would be a cool share with the fine people of BHW. Here it is:


    " You spent a lot of years in school. You learned a lot.


    Some of what you learned you need to un-learn as soon as possible. Here are five key attitudes you should adopt instead:


    1. If you only do what you're told, you'll excel.


    I know. School was hard.


    But not that hard.


    If you did what you were told--go to class, do the reading, turn in assignments on time, etc.--you could get As. Initiative was not required and, in fact, was often frowned on.
    Now--whether you work for someone else or run your own business--doing what you're told makes you average. Not superior, not excellent... just average.
    To be above average, or to achieve better than average results, you must do two things:



    1. Do what others are willing to do, and do it better, and
    2. Do what others aren't willing to do

    Otherwise, you're just average.


    2. Being micro-managed is to be expected.



    Sure, you felt overly-controlled in school: Dates, timelines, rules... not to mention the seemingly arbitrary policies and nonsensical assignments. You saw graduation as the day you would finally have more freedom.


    Nope.


    In school you paid people to criticize, direct, and at times micro-manage you. Now you're the one getting paid... yet you somehow don't feel it's fair that investors, partners, or customers can dictate what you do, sometimes down to the smallest detail?


    Don't expect someone to trust you to perform a task or service?and give you money to perform that service?until you've proven you can be trusted to perform that service.
    Then, once you've proven your skills, if you still feel micro-managed it's your responsibility to change the situation. Communicate before you are communicated to. Answer questions before questions are asked. Demonstrate your value before you are asked to prove your value.


    No one wants to micro-manage you. They have better things to do with their time.


    If you're being micro-managed it's probably because you need to be.



    3. Your time off is the highlight of the year.

    You may have forgotten your mom's birthday, but I'll bet you knew the exact day every semester ended and the start and end of Spring Break. And you lived for snow days.
    So it only makes sense to see weekends and vacations as the highlight of your working year, right?


    Actually, no: If you feel you endure the workweek just to get to the payoff of the weekend, you're in the wrong business. Find work you enjoy; then you won't see time off as a chance to finally do something fun but as a chance to do something else fun.


    While you'll never love everything you do in your professional life, you should enjoy the majority of it.


    Otherwise you're not living?you're just working.


    4. Getting criticized means you failed.



    Here's another pay/paid dichotomy. In college you paid professors to critique your work.


    So now that you are the one getting paid, why is it unfair for someone--like a customer, investor, or key partner?to critique your work?
    It's not.


    When you get negative feedback, see it as an opportunity. Think, "Wow, I didn't realize I wasn't doing that right. I didn't realize I wasn't doing that as well as I could."
    Criticism is a chance to learn--and this time you're getting paid to learn.


    Never complain when someone pays you to learn.


    5. Success is based on toeing the line.


    Say you disagreed with a professor's point of view on a particular point. You may even have been right... but the only way to get an A in the class was to parrot the professor's take on the subject. Except in rare cases, confirming and following the rules was everything.


    In business, conforming only ensures that you will achieve the same results as other people.


    If you want to achieve different results you'll have to think and act differently. Do your homework, think critically, and don't be afraid to create your own path.
    But don't be different just for the sake of being different. Be different because it's who you are and what you believe... and because it will get you where you want to go, with your integrity and your sense of self intact. "

    Original article: http://www.inc.com/jeff-haden/entrepreneurs-5-things-to-un-learn-from-school.html?nav=next
     
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  2. davids355

    davids355 Jr. VIP Jr. VIP Premium Member

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    Good stuff. To be honest the main things I un-learned from school are:

    1. Messing around is fun - well it is fun, but I messed around too much at school cos it was fun, if I could go back if concentrate a lot more.

    2. Learning isn't cool- yea, when I was at school, it was considered uncool to actually be good in class, man I wish I had of been a stronger individual and just done as well as I could.

    Ah the wisdom of age:)
     
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  3. stariher

    stariher Registered Member

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    hhhhhhhh
    I learned from school, that I wast 10 years of my life with some MF teachers, and after all that, I got a job with my own knowledge and experiance
     
  4. BHopkins

    BHopkins Moderator Staff Member Moderator Jr. VIP

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    As I get older, I find learning enjoyable again, even though I'm not in school I read historical books and biographies because I enjoy them.
     
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  5. HereComesTheDrop

    HereComesTheDrop Junior Member

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    this is very interesting and I agree. good post
     
  6. zebrahat

    zebrahat Elite Member

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    One BIG thing to unlearn from school:

    Time horizon. "You must prepare to start a career where your main earnings come from a check that appears every 1-2 weeks." This trains you to confine your financial expectations to what you can do with periodic payments, i.e., the next check and the check after.

    Millions of work drones whole money planning revolves around a time window of 3- 5 weeks---they have a detailed idea about how they will spend the next check, and a general idea about the one after that. And that's it. The idea of waiting 3-5 MONTHS for a payoff (let alone 3-5 YEARS) on an entrepreneurial venture is not merely alien to most people, it terrifies them. And that is the greatest obstacle to evolving off of the rat race.
     
  7. Beingakrant

    Beingakrant BANNED BANNED

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    One of the greatest myths I un-learned was that if you fail, then you'll be termed as a failure. During school days I was scared of failing and it had a great impact on my marks. My teachers used to always scare students with statements such as "if they don't study, then they will fail". Failing was a crime back then. But, as I grew older, I realized that failing is ok, if you're ready to learn from your mistakes and remember not to repeat them.
    We shouldn't be scared from failure; we should rather embrace it with open hands. I come across people who brand themselves as a failed person just because their plans couldn't materialize. There's no harm in trying one more time, and one more after that. Just find your mistakes and move to something better and greater.

    Another thing I un-learned was that I had to be master of every field. During my school days, I had 5 subjects and I had to slog my ass in order to ensure that I score at least 75%+ in every subject. IF I didn't, then hell used to break loose. It used to appear as if I had committed a sin such as murder or rape. :D ... However, things had to change and they changed. After reaching in college, I started giving major priority to only subject and almost ignoring others ( I used open books of other subjects one day before exams). In this manner, I mastered a subject and at the same time passed in other subjects too. So, here's a lesson for newbies who are entering into IM, please don't try everything because then you're digging your own grave. You should take a method and focus all your energy on it. This way the permutations and combinations will be in your favor.

    We come across lots of negativity during school days, OP mentioned few things to un-learn, so it's essential for us to flush out these dogmas of life and start a relatively newer life.

    Cheers :)
     
  8. daftone79

    daftone79 Newbie

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    School is so much different now than when I went to school. My friend tells me they don't mark wrong answers with red ink anymore because it hurts the child to tell them they are wrong. How do they learn then?
     
  9. B. Friendly

    B. Friendly BANNED BANNED

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    The most important lesson I learned about the difference between school and "real life" is how extreme teachers are, and how atypical they are of ordinary citizens. If you think teachers are "normal", then centrally-controlled authoritarian socialism, and all that goes with it, will also feel normal.

    Consider, people lie on a spectrum, with those that crave safety and security on one end, and those that are willing to risk it all for BIG REWARD on the other end. This is the entrepreneurial end, populated by people that are willing to sell all their property to fund a business endeavor, do whatever it takes, lay it all on the line on the chance that they will WIN BIG. Frequently these people FAIL and wind up living with their parents for a while when they are 34, or sleeping in their truck for a few weeks. These people are not just "dice rollers", they work their asses off and actually BUILT the casino, and with their "win at any cost" attitude, sometimes they roll loaded dice, and get themselves into major trouble.

    Teachers, however, are at the OTHER end. They are the opposite of all that. They don't just work to be someone's employee, they work for the GOVERNMENT, which if you think about it is the closest thing you can get to working for either God or Santa Claus. They are sheltered and protected by the all-knowing and all-powerful government. They get all manner of perquisites and whatnot, but their pay scale is also severely limited. Government employees in general, and in this case teachers are willing to make a deal with their employer that in exchange for never having an opportunity to make unlimited sums of money, in exchange for that they get extreme job security, an easy retirement and it's almost impossible to get fired. Teachers, like any other socialist, are not dazzled by the unlimited potential of the open market; they trade all of that in for the security of knowing that their God-Government will take care of them for the rest of their lives, as long as the put in a minimum of effort, and do not do anything wrong. Show up on time every day, dressed professionally, go through the motions, do this for 20 years and they can retire.

    And the attitudes and beliefs of these marginally-functional extremists have impact upon the young minds of children in ways that cannot be measured or tested for. These people are so terrified of competing in an open market that they are willing to trade their entire life for the promise of the security of mediocrity. The infect young children with that irrational fear of risk, fear of failure, and even the idea of "the failure of success" which is that the more successful and wealthier you become, the worse of a person you are, and the more you must therefore pay in taxes to make up your deficiencies in character. It feels better to the poor when they tax the wealthy, than if they described it as the parasites taxing the producers.

    In a scholastic/academic environment, success is defined as PUBLIC RECOGNITION. You get your name and picture on a poster near the front door. "Teacher of the Month" and "Student of the Week" and "Best Science Project in 2009". Some students see this, and have an extreme negative reaction, and don't know why, as they've never been given the philosophical infrastructure of expecting (even demanding) tangible reward for noteworthy success.

    What students SHOULD be saying, if they have been educated properly is, "Fuck that stupid ass picture on that stupid fucking poster. How about giving me some fucking MONEY instead. And fuck that $50 shit, too. YOU, Mr. Jack-Ass Principal make $4,000 a month and you are the most medicore motherfucker that ever lived. You can stuff that fucking $50 "prize". I did the best Science Project in 2009 and I want $5,000, and I want it fucking NOW."

    That reaction would be natural, and healthy, and indicate the character of a superior Alpha personality; the kind of person that the mediocre and the average people rely on to make good decisions and get things done. <see next post for proof that I am one of them>

    Note, if you re-read the Original Post, and keep this idea of a spectrum (socialists vs. entrepreneurs) in mind, most of what the OP are the natural consequences upon students that are indoctrinated by the class of people I just described.

    In short, students may be "taught" conceptual and factual information, but they are indoctrinated into a system that discourages risk taking, punishes mistakes and fails to adequately reward for success. Simultaneously, superior performing people see lackluster performers being rewarded for all manner of irrelevant qualities, such as race, color, sexual orientation and whether or not they can be considered a "victim" in some way. It is a natural reaction to see "society" (and in this case society is exemplified as "school") rewarded people for sub-standard and non-performance and develop an anti-social attitude, DUH. Society STARTED it, and then acts surprised when the alphas learn to hate most people. Most people deserve hatred, as they are feeble, self-centered and stupid.

    Bottom line, if one intends on succeeding in an open market internet, one had better start jettisoning all the socialist indoctrination the government has given them for the last 12 years.
     
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    Last edited: Jan 9, 2013
  10. steelballs

    steelballs BANNED BANNED

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    Once again B. Friendly dazzles as his quill comes alive...
     
  11. B. Friendly

    B. Friendly BANNED BANNED

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    4 days before Christmas I'm standing in line at the grocery store with 5 or so items in my almost-empty shopping cart. The place is packed, everyone is rushing around, exactly what you would expect in the middle of an urban grocery at 8:00 p.m. just before Christmas. I'm planing out my next stops while waiting in line. Usually, there's a hold-up because someone forgot they had a coupon, or the bar-code reader won't read the price on the head of lettuce and so "Produce, call #15, Produce please call 15" blares over the loudspeaker.

    At the entrance to the store, a DVD is blaring out the door from a massive 45" big-screen TV (with built in microwave) on sale now for only $479.00, while supplies last. A little kid wants to know if Santa is going to land on the roof or in the front yard like he did last year. The old man in front of me looks ill, and I wonder if this is going to be his last Christmas. His skin has that yellow-grey look people get, just before some Dr. tells them they have an inoperable tumor. His skin looks blotchy-red too <security?!>, like maybe he's already been getting radiation...

    waitaminute.

    Did I just hear a woman's voice say -

    <Security!>

    The intonation was just right, and it came from my left, and I was moving. My right foot slipped on the wet floor a bit as I pushed off, and a veered to the right and ran into the girl that was in front of me
    "Dude! What the FUCK!"
    "Sorry"
    And that's when I knew that I was moving to...
    I pushed past a few I couldn't weave around, saying excuse me loudly, and sounding somewhat apologetic and as I got near the confrontation I noticed that hundreds of people were turning towards the sound of the action. They formed an almost perfect semi-circle of interested bystanders; it was almost as if we were in a movie theater watching a movie being blared from a 500 foot big-screen TV. This was the last impression I had before I GOT INVOLVED.

    As I broke out of the crowd I see:
    Young male, looking non-aggressive and backing into the nutritional supplement section while
    Young girl is aggressively hitting him in a flailing manner, while
    mature woman is looking around wildly, saying "Security" hoping someone will come in and break it up and
    continuing the motion that I started way back there, I slide in between the two and with my left forearm a put it across the boy's chest (just in case he wants to hit her back) and with my right hand I plant it squarely on her chest and hold her back from him and then I ...

    realize that my world is completely different now, than it was just 5 seconds ago.

    Since I was already there, doing what I was doing, I just decided that I would continue to keep her off him until someone else shows up. Someone in authority like a cop, or a

    Big tall, young-looking manager type shows up wearing his official, grocery store nametag that says "Manager" on it. Seeing someone in authority in the area, I decide it's time for me to get the hell out of there, and I go back to my shopping cart, and get back in line.

    Total elapsed time: 30 seconds.

    Later, driving home in the dark with the adrenaline still singing love songs in my chest, it occurred to me that I was moving toward the confrontation before I knew that I was moving toward the confrontation. And when I say moving, I mean moving violently and with purpose. Pushing people, saying excuse me and then pushing the next person out of the way. Had no idea what I was pushing myself into. It was just a few days after the massacre of the 1st graders in Connecticut. Maybe that was why, when I heard that woman's "just right" intonation from 75 feet away in a crowed grocery store blaring with other noises, I just naturally started moving. It wasn't "me", really. Not the me that makes decisions, no it was the physical me, that does things instinctively, does things naturally, like how one ducks when an object is thrown at your head.

    I just moved. No thinking whatsoever. Not a hero. Didn't know enough about what was going on to BE a "hero". Just that woman's "just right" intonation. Not fake. Not playing. That was real, and a part of me knew it through and through. Everything else just happened.

    I didn't think I was particularly special until after. When the adrenaline died down a bit, and I started thinking about how different the situation might have looked when I broke through the crowd. Instead of a whacked-out teenage girl flailing at a hapless and backpedalling teenage boy, maybe I would have seen an angry ex-husband with a gun, determined to make that grimly masculine point that if he couldn't have his wife, no one else could either. Maybe I would have woke up in mid-stride to discover that I was running headlong into a confrontation with a orange-haired psychopath with two handguns, or a freaky ectomorph with an assault rifle. An enraged boyfriend has just learned the baby isn't his.

    I had no idea what it was going to be. However, I was aimed and shot right at it, like I had come from a cannon.

    And, when I seriously look at it all, not from the perspective of what actually happened, but instead from the perspective of what COULD have happened, I know that I would rather die than be standing around like a fucking bystander while someone bad is doing something bad. I can still see all those people, just standing there watching, standing in my way, like they were watching Jerry Springer, or Honey Boo-Boo. Fat, stupid and inert people that have grown so used to being constantly entertained that, when a real-life crisis suddenly erupts they think it's just a continuation of the movie their ADHD minds were just paying attention to.

    They can't tell the fucking difference between TV and real-life.

    And that's why I'm better than most of you. Most of you people are fucking retarded. Fat, stupid and inert, standing around watching things happen, waiting around expectantly for someone else to hand you what you haven't got the ability to earn. Standing around, waiting to be entertained while some nut-case pulls out an assault rifle and starts killing people, and maybe you will be one of them.

    Meanwhile, I'm moving as fast as I can, toward the sound of gunfire. I can hear <security> in the middle of a loudly blaring grocery store, and I'll loudly say I'm sorry for bumping into you 35 feet before some nutcase shoots me in the head with 5.56 X 39 ammunition. I'm real, and most of you are not. I do real things, in the real universe, and most of you are figments of your own imagination.
     
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    Last edited: Jan 9, 2013
  12. hatemachine

    hatemachine Regular Member

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